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Men’s Health

Live Longer and Prosper: Men’s Health Month focuses on closing the longevity gap

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The COVID-19 pandemic has recently added another dark footnote to our lives.

Average life expectancy in the United States fell a full year in the first six months of 2020, according to preliminary data from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), and the gender gap widened from 78.8 to 77.8 years.

Women now outlive men by an average of 5.4 years versus the 5.1-year average in 2019, the NCHS reported.

Historically, women outlived men for a variety of reasons. Research shows, for example, that men take more risks and are exposed to more work risks. But men also have a shorter lifespan because they often don’t care about their own health.

Statistics show that men are more likely than women to skip routine health exams and doctor visits. As a result, warning signs of heart disease, cancer, respiratory disease, and other problems can go untreated and undetected, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Men’s Health Month, celebrated every June, is a good time to remind male friends, relatives, co-workers, and employees that it is possible to reduce health risks and that early screening can prevent small health problems from becoming large, expensive, and deadly become.

Consider this list of healthy behaviors:

  • Do not smoke. Smoking cessation programs and medications used together are highly effective.
  • Eat healthy. Choose vegetables, fruits, whole grains, high fiber foods, and lean sources of protein. Eliminate or reduce your intake of sugar and saturated fats.
  • Drink alcohol in moderation.
  • Watch your weight. Excess pounds can increase your risk of heart disease, diabetes, and some cancers.
  • Exercise helps with weight control and can reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke.
  • Coping with stress. Take steps to relieve stress or learn to manage stress healthily.
  • Fasten your seat belt. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), men are 10% less likely to wear seat belts than women.

Mental health is another area that affects men. Men are more likely to die from suicide than women. Women are also less likely than women to discuss or seek treatment about mental health problems such as depression and anxiety.

Patients with depression, sadness, feelings of worthlessness, or thoughts of suicide should contact mental health providers. The growth of telemedicine services during the pandemic, including virtual mental wellness visits, has shown promise in alleviating some of the concerns expressed by those in need of psychological wellness counseling, experts say.

Ultimately, the best offensive is a good health defense. Health checks for blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar levels are especially important in old age.

Colorectal cancer screening, which is both simple and inexpensive, could reduce colon cancer deaths by 60%, according to the American Cancer Society. Over 50,000 people die from the disease every year.

Prostate cancer occurs in about 1 in 8 men in the United States. Older men, black men, and men with a family history of the disease are at the highest risk. The American Cancer Society recommends that most men discuss prostate cancer screening with their doctors by the age of 50. This organization recommends that high-risk men, especially those with relatives who develop prostate cancer at an early age, begin these conversations at the age of 40.

More information is available at www.CapitalBlueCross.com.

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Men’s Health

‘We’ve all had too much time in our heads over the last while’

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PJ Gallagher is supporting Men’s Health Week starting June 14th by calling on men across Ireland to make their health a priority in life.

“Traditionally, we’ve been pretty bad at taking care of our own health. About 41% of men get health problems and do nothing about them, or like me, they will save their problems to eventually go to their GP with all of them. We don’t seem to take our problems seriously, ”he says. “I think if you tell a man to take care of his health, he’ll go to the gym or drink less, but you have to act when you are not feeling well.”

The comedian and actor has teamed up with Lloyds Pharmacy to promote the free men’s health check, available at all Llyods locations.

“Mood problems, skin diseases, erectile dysfunction – whatever it is, just go in. It won’t cost you anything. Whatever the problem, it’s nothing to be ashamed of. Those ten seconds of what you think are embarrassing are worth it for peace of mind, ”says the 46-year-old.

“Especially when it comes to mental health. We’ve all had too much time on our heads lately. A lot of people don’t know where to go, but there are trained people in pharmacies who can point you in the right direction and that’s good to know. “

What shape are you in

I was fine in training, but for the past six months I’ve dropped it. I think the pandemic has finally started winning. But I’m still reasonably fit. I cycle a lot and have booked a gym now that they have reopened.

What are your healthiest eating habits?

I am very familiar with routine. I’m the type of person who can eat the same thing for days and not get bored, a bit like a dog. I now also cook everything I never did in my life before March last year, and I love it.

What are your most guilty joys?

If I ever splurge, it would be at breakfast. I have no problem having two sausage rolls and a chocolate bar from Dairy Milk for breakfast on Sundays.

What would keep you up at night?

I am worried about everything. Everything can be perfectly fine and I will still go to bed wondering when it will fall apart. Anything from the bohemians losing a cup game to the pandemic would keep me awake.

How do you relax?

Motorcycling. It is as close as possible to meditation.

Who are your athletic heroes?

Eric Cantona and Valentino Rossi. I love these great attitudes that they have. They are the type of people who have the ability to go to any place as if it is theirs.

What is your favorite smell?

The Manhattan popcorn factory in Finglas.

When was the last time you cried?

When my mom got her vaccine. It was a very emotional day because she is 83 and has not been able to see her grandchildren for so long. Everyone in the family broke down when she finally got it. Before that, Dublin won the All Ireland for the last time.

What qualities do you dislike least in others?

I hate people who don’t tell you things directly. Just tell me what you think i’m fine

What are your least favorite traits in yourself?

I would like a little more confidence. I also always worry about letting people down and that tarnishes too many things.

Do you pray?

I don’t know who I’m praying to or what I’m praying for, but I do it every day.

What would brighten up your day?

I can’t wait to get myself a sneaky pint. It’s so easy to just sit at a bar and have a pint on your own. I always feel like I’m cheating on the world when I do.

Which quote inspires you the most and why?

“Critics don’t count.” It was one thing that kept going on my mind when I got up.

Where is your favorite place in the world?

Dalymount Park. The excitement rises for the next Friday night with those lights, the people singing and the team watching the team go onto the field. I get emotional when I think about it.

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Men’s Health

New Study Claims It’s Not Healthy to Be ‘Fit but Fat’

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A new study found that people best defined as “fit but fat” are at increased risk of obese health problems.

Fit but fat is a slang term for metabolically healthy obesity (MHO). People categorized as MHO have a body mass index of 30 or higher, but no systemic inflammation, problematic blood lipids, or insulin problems that are common with obesity.

A study by researchers at the University of Glasgow found that compared to metabolically healthy people who are not medically obese, people with MHO are 4.3 times more likely to have type 2 diabetes, 18% more likely to have heart attacks or strokes and, incredibly, their risk of heart failure is increased by 76%.

“People with metabolically healthy obesity were at a significantly higher risk of diabetes, heart attack and stroke, heart failure, respiratory disease and all-cause mortality compared to non-obese people with a healthy metabolic profile,” said Dr. Frederick Ho. Research Associate in Public Health at the University of Glasgow.

For the study, the researchers monitored 381,363 people who fell into one of four categories: metabolically healthy overweight (MHO), metabolically unhealthy overweight (MUO), metabolically healthy non-obesity (MHN), or metabolically unhealthy non-obesity (MUN).

It found that MHO individuals were generally younger, watched less television, exercised more, had a higher level of education, a lower deprivation index, higher consumption of red and processed meat, and were less male and not white than participants who were metabolically unhealthy obese.

Even so, if they are metabolically unhealthy, they are at greater risk of suffering from various obesity problems.

“In general, cardiovascular and respiratory outcomes rates were highest in MUO, followed by MUN and MHO, with the exception of heart failure and fatal heart failure and respiratory disease. For these results, people with MHO had higher rates than those with MUN, “said Ho.

In addition, the researchers also found that of a subset of participants for whom they had metabolism and obesity follow-up data, a third of those with metabolically healthy obesity became metabolically unhealthy within 3 to 5 years at the start of the study .

“People with metabolically healthy obesity are not ‘healthy’ because they are at higher risk of heart attack and stroke, heart failure and respiratory disease than people without obesity with a normal metabolic profile,” said Ho.

“Weight management could be beneficial for anyone with obesity, regardless of their metabolic profile. The term “metabolically healthy obesity” should be avoided in clinical medicine as it is misleading and different strategies for defining risk should be explored, “he added.

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Daniel Davies is a writer for Men’s Health UK and has been reporting for various publications on sports science, fitness and culture for the past five years.

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Men’s Health

Watch a US Marine Attempt the Climbing Strength Test

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Michael Eckert’s upper body strength speaks for itself. The U.S. Marine and two-time American Ninja Warrior competitor previously broke the world record for the most pull-ups in a minute when he did 50 repetitions on the bar. He also regularly shares his expert tips on building stamina and improving your pull-up technique on his YouTube channel. But in a recent video Eckert proves his strength in a completely different kind of challenge and faces the climbing strength test popularized by professional climber and YouTuber Magnus Midtbø.

The test consists of four rounds: a weighted slope on a 20mm bar, a maximum weighted chin-up, a maximum front lever grip, and finally a maximum dead slope.

For the weighted hang, Eckert starts by attaching 52 pounds to his belt – about 28 percent of his total body weight of 184 pounds – and tries to hang from the edge for 5 seconds. Then he increases the weight to 106 pounds – more than half his body weight – and repeats the 5-second slope. “It hurts, but I can go further up,” he says, showing the signs of wear and tear on his hands that are already visible. He peaks at 131 pounds and earns 7 points on this round.

In the weighted pull-up, Eckert starts with one rep with 106 pounds of additional weight, then moves to 150 pounds, then 166 pounds, and scores 8 points.

The third event is the front lever, a popular calisthenics movement in which Eckert has to stay horizontal as long as possible. The moment his body begins to sink, his time is up. He manages a total of 12 seconds and collects another 8 points. “That’s not bad,” he says. “My damn head was about to burst though … It literally feels like you’re doing a self-inflicted nosebleed.”

The fourth and final test is the dead hang, in which he has to hang on the pull-up bar with both hands and arms outstretched for as long as possible. “In my opinion, this is probably the most miserable test of all,” says Eckert. “We’ll see how it goes.”

His eventual total time on Dead Hang is 2 minutes 1 second, which is only worth 4 points. “That is the worst pain,” says Eckert. “And there are a lot of people out there who can hold a dead slope for six minutes. More strength for you. I’m proud to get over 2 minutes, but it’s definitely something I have to work on, this pain tolerance , the stamina in this position … That was brutal … That was definitely my worst category.

Eckert’s total number of points for the climbing strength test is 27 out of a total of 40 possible points. This corresponds to a climbing ability of V14. “I’ve never climbed a V14, probably because my technique isn’t that great,” he says. “But that’s really cool to know.”

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