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Men’s Health

Two Words I’ve Faced My Entire Life That I’m Finally Confronting Today

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“No Asians.”

Those two words came back to haunt me at this intersection between AAPI Heritage Month and Pride Month as I watch the increasing violence and mass murders of Asian Americans without end.

I grew up in New York and tried to find my community online. It was a dark place. I was regularly told through messages on gay dating platforms, “Sorry, not for Asians” or the occasional backhand compliment, “Oh, you’re looking for an Asian.” Most noticeable and common, however, were two words that were written openly and predominantly on users’ public profiles: “No Asians”. These words spoke for themselves. I grew up feeling shame on my heritage, race and identity. To just get through life, I normalized this constant racial disapproval. I struggled with dating and relationships, self-care and self-love for years, believing that I was less desirable and sexually non-viable.

Two decades later, AAPI still makes LGBTQ + problems invisible and untouched. A recent study found nearly 3 in 4 AAPI LGBTQ + teenagers who today often feel worthless or hopeless. However, these statistics are not surprising. “No Asians” is a term that is still used in the LGBTQ + community and for the most part remains unchallenged.

Platforms like Grindr and Scruff have completely failed the AAPI community. Not only have they ignored our and other marginalized communities, but they also failed to take any action to suspend racist users. They even introduced and defended profiles by ethnicity. Just recently they agreed to remove their ethnicity filter after the BLM movement last June.

But the damage was done. Every time I saw these words, and every time I had to normalize the constant rejection of my ethnicity within my own LGBTQ + community, it slowly engulfed my own self-esteem and struggle to be proud of my identity as a Sino-American living be in the United States.

Hoa People Chinese

Rejection within our own community is nothing new. We just have to look to my family’s story. My family is ethnically Chinese; My grandparents fled China after the communist revolution and had my parents in Vietnam. My parents were discriminated against, viewed as competition for local jobs and as eternal foreigners. There was even a term for these “other” Chinese: “Hoa 華人”.

When Vietnam fell under communist rule, the Hoa were targeted and my family was confiscated in 1979. Without a home in a country where they were born, they tried to escape by boat. It’s a well-known risky trip: my grandmother’s family boat capsized with all the passengers on board. My parents were among the lucky ones and were eventually accepted to New York as refugees from the Vietnam War. They came here with practically nothing but pain and hope. I am inspired by my parents for their courage, even though their lived experiences had a complicated impact on how I dealt with my intersectional identity.

“Society has taught me to internalize the exemplary minority myth that I already had it well enough here and didn’t have the right to seek help or complain.”

What does it mean to be a gay Asian American?

It means to be taught to be grateful to be born here and to have a roof over your head, which wasn’t a guarantee my parents always had. It means we are taught to “lower our heads and work hard” because in America we can already stand out and be targeted, just like the hoa. It means justifying the obvious racism I face because platforms created to connect with my own community normalized it. It means to justify being objectified and fetishized as “Gayians” because for someone who makes it known that they only like Asians, it is better than “No Asians”, right? And it means burying my feelings because society has taught me to internalize the exemplary minority myth that I already had it well enough here and didn’t have the right to seek help or complain.

I’ve never told anyone how I felt about “No Asians”. Not my friends, my family, my loved ones. Maybe because I normalized it myself. Maybe because it was too painful to unwrap.

The intersectionality of oppression

Even with the ugly history of anti-Asian hatred in the US since the 19th century, our problems are compounded by a historically not so unified AAPI community. The history of borders and wars in Asia and the different experiences of the 50 ethnic groups with AAPIs have made this call to come together in our current crisis difficult. The Asian American experience I grew up with was shared, with unwritten classes within AAPIs due to socioeconomics and politics. That is wrong – and that has to change. We have often focused on what makes us different from what we have in common.

In considering my intersectionality of being gay and Asian, I found a double marginalization in both communities. On the LGBTQ + side, as an Asian, I’ve felt marginalized: I’ve rejected or fetishized my ethnicity by a community (not sure, which is worse) that has struggled for acceptance itself. On the Asian side, my parents’ story with China and Vietnam shows the long-standing divisions in which we double marginalize AAPIs within our own community.

But while both communities have often been victims of oppression, our communities have also been the oppressors. Instead of eradicating the hateful behavior that we tried to escape, we also passed it on to the people around us in our own communities. That also has to change if we really want to stand together against hatred.

“We should examine in our own lives the times when we introduced ethnic or racial filters into friendship, dating, or attitudes – whether explicitly, implicitly, or as a spectator.”

A call to unity and inclusion

For the LGBTQ + community that has been oppressed for years but recently faced challenges in the struggle for equality, I ask you to join us in strengthening queer AAPI organizations like NQAPIA and GAPIMNY and calling out those who are “No Asians “Embody. til today. Let’s set a better example of inclusivity than the parties during COVID. I call on my own community, to which I belong, not to divide us, but to bind these broken people back – to recognize this widespread racism that is not talked about. I urge platforms like Grindr to create features that will filter out racist language (which I know if you invented a racing filter) and no longer ignore those issues that appear on their platforms every day.

For the AAPI community: let’s immerse ourselves in our self-learned divisions, racism and prejudice, learn about our history, learn and unlearn our divisions, and take steps so that we can come together. We are more united and we will not win until we all make progress. We can start fighting for our most marginalized AAPIs and supporting organizations like CAAAV, Red Canary Song and AAJC.

To our community of allies – and to all who have valued or benefited from the Asian people or culture – we open our hearts and offer support to our AAPI colleagues, friends and local businesses at a time of greatest rejection and violence that we have here are exposed at home. As a music manager for over a decade, I ask my colleagues in the $ 720 billion media industry to show us this and put it in your scripts and songs so that we can be caught up in everyday American stories and no longer have to live like eternal foreigners.

The greatest impact we can make is that of the individual. We should examine in our own lives the times when we introduced ethnic or racial filters into friendship, dating, or attitudes – whether explicitly, implicitly, or as a bystander. Include us and stand up for us so that our contributions to American society are protected and our people do not have to die with the door closed. I am here as a proud gay Asian American dreaming of the words that will one day replace the title of this article.

Jason Ve is a music and technology manager and VP at 88rising, the leading record label of the world’s most influential Asian artists. He previously led partnerships at Google and Disney and is a member of the advisory board of Asian Americans Advancing Justice (AAJC), a national not-for-profit organization that advocates for AAPIs.

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Men’s Health

We Found the Solutions to Summer’s Toughest Style Situations

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What should I wear? It was a pretty normal question we asked ourselves before the pandemic. But to ask now what clothes to wear is not purely pragmatic. It’s existential. Which pants should I wear to work? What kind of pants should I own? What is the point of pants and who decided we had to wear them?

And listen, we too wore sweatpants and sweat shorts and t-shirts to work last year. We too let our bosses see our questionable WFH outfits and unmeasured gallery walls in virtual meetings. Social boundaries have been broken, the back of our cupboards have long been forgotten. But now that things are largely reopening, we could all use a little reminder of how to dress for this. So we teamed up with our friends at Klarna to find the eaaaasssssyy solutions for some of these tricky style situations, such as going back to the office, finally taking the long-awaited vacation with friends and family or sliding to all the postponed ones Weddings.

The facts about Klarna

Klarna is an all-in-one payment and shopping service that makes both shopping and the purchase process easier. Download their app and you can shop at any retailer in America while also getting access to a custom selection of brands, offers and rewards tailored specifically to your type of shopping – like in Klarna, most of the heaviest lifts to get the to find good things for you. You can also use the app at many partner retailers you already know and love (think Adidas, Lululemon, Macy’s, Bloomingdale’s, and more). Just click the Klarna button when you check out on their website or scan the app in the store, and from there it goes “smoothly”.

If you want to pay later, there are plenty of options for your wallet too.

There are also many advantages for your wallet when shopping with Klarna. First, there is the popular “Pay in 4”, where you split your purchase into four installments. Don’t worry, there is no interest and it doesn’t affect your creditworthiness. Klarna also gives you access to exclusive deals with hundreds of their trading partners. Save items you love on your profile and the app will notify you when there’s a price drop or sale so you can get the best items at the best price.

Whatever you want to buy – and however you want to buy it – just got easier. Hey, even style icons like A $ AP Rocky are turning to the app to reconnect with their style. And if it works for him, you know it works for us too. Here, three of our very own Men’s Health editors share their advice on the post-pandemic situations they shopped for and what they chose to shop for with Klarna.

Back to the office

office

Spencer Dukoff, assistant editor for content strategy, prepares to return to the office. Not only will his everyday life feel completely different, he will also think differently about it. “I’m more focused than ever on comfort and versatility,” he says. “I can only imagine that more than a year of working from home will push the office wear norms in a more casual direction.” But that doesn’t mean he really wants to wear gym shorts to work. What it means is buying clothes that have high quality fabrics at the fore.

spencer dukoff

To Spencer, it looks like grabbing nifty sweatpants that look professional but feels like sweatpants and pair them with a classic polo shirt. When it comes to a blazer, he’s looking for one that feels as far from rigid as it gets without venturing into loungewear. Wear it with a clean t-shirt and a pair of shoes that feel like sneakers but look classy.

“In terms of equipment, this is a reintroduction of real commuting,” Spencer points out. “A lot of things that I took for granted, like headphones or a watch, become a little more important to maintaining a sense of normality and routine.” He opts for unobtrusive noise-canceling headphones and a cool leather briefcase to hold all of his hide other technology.

He also invests in a few important things. First, a series of mugs to keep customers entertained and to make his desk in the office more homely. And he makes a new watch – one he can wear to work, but also one that he can wear every day and that makes him feel good. To manage his expenses intelligently, he’d go for the Klarna Payment Option in Four, which allows buyers to plan larger purchases without interest – instead of having to watch them sit idly on a credit card statement.

QuietComfort earphones

Wingtip Oxford

Wingtip Oxford

Cole Haan
macys.com

$ 130.00

Regular fit polo shirt

Regular fit polo shirt

REISS
Bloomingdales.com

$ 94.00

Canfield Weekday Stationery

Canfield Weekday Stationery

Shinola
Bloomingdales.com

$ 895.00

ABC pants narrow 34

ABC pants narrow 34 “

lululemon
lululemon.com

$ 128.00

Venture blazer

Venture blazer

lululemon
lululemon.com

$ 198.00

Formula I watch, 43 mm 43

Formula I watch, 43 mm 43

Day, this year
Bloomingdales.com

$ 1,450.00

Old fashioned glasses

Old fashioned glasses

Marquis of Waterford
macys.com

$ 59.99

Pack a vacation bag

vacation

Ebenezer Samuel, fitness director, looks forward to spending his summer outdoors. While he is stocking up on a few holiday items, he thinks differently about shopping. “The pandemic was the first time I actually LIVE in my house and I swear we found rooms that I didn’t know I had,” he says. “It was a good reminder of how many things I had collected in total that I never used or didn’t need. After the pandemic, I’m definitely thinking more about it. Do i really need this? Will it really enrich my life and my experience? ”

Ebenezer samuel

Getting to the beach is one of those experiences Eb can pack his bags for – taking versatility, quality and comfort into account. His wardrobe has to work in the sand for days and the rest of his vacation, for example double packs such as quick-drying swimming trunks that also serve as shorts and a polo made of absorbent terrycloth. For some of the more fashionable items, Eb uses Klarna’s collection function, with which you can put together products from different retailers and keep an eye on all offers. Eb is waiting for this Klarna price drop notification so he can grab a pair of mules and polarized sunglasses that his wife “won’t make fun of”.

To freshen up your equipment: speakers, a tablet for reading and a sturdy but cool weekend travel bag that goes with everything. This is ideal for summer excursions as well as for autumn hikes and ski trips. He’s also investing in an expensive but necessary cooler. If he uses it now while paying for it over the next few months, he can really enjoy it (no large loan debt required).

Stretch swim trunks

    Polarized sunglasses

Polarized sunglasses

Oakley
backcountry.com

$ 97.80

Club C shoes without laces

Base Camp 132L travel bag

Base Camp 132L travel bag

The north wall
backcountry.com

$ 168.95

Portable roam speaker

Roadie 24 cooler

Roadie 24 cooler

YETI
backcountry.com

$ 199.99

Terrycloth polo

Terrycloth polo

Orlebar brown
orlebarbrown.com

$ 175.00

Galaxy Tab S7 11

Galaxy Tab S7 11 “

Samsung
samsung.com

$ 199.99

Do the wedding season rounds

wedding

Adam Mansuroglu, Senior Style and Commerce Editor, is ready for a change in style and looks forward to clothes that make him feel good. “I haven’t worn a suit in what feels like a century, but now that it’s time to store my sweatpants, I want to be totally stylish,” he says. “This summer, I’m trying to channel the looks of some iconic movies with classic pieces that have a touch of retro vibes.” To Adam, this effortless cool looks like a seersucker suit, linen polo, and loafers – light and comfortable for the heat, but heavy in the boast.

adam mansuroglu

Adam is always looking for high quality clothing and accessories, and this summer wedding season is no exception. “I’m absolutely ready to spend some money on goods that will stand the test of time, but luckily Klarna allows me to redesign my wardrobe after the vaccination without burdening my wallet at the same time,” he says. That means he can start right away with his carry-on luggage, sunglasses, and jewelry – all of the next-level accessories that he would normally need to purchase individually to meet his current shopping budget.

And because he is planning to spend a busy summer away from home, Adam stores himself with technology to keep track of things: a portable charger for his travel bag and an AirTag to keep track of things on the go. He could pay off this beautiful bag over time, but that doesn’t stop him from using it asap.

Seersucker suit

Seersucker suit

Indochinese
indochino.com

$ 429.00

Clubmaster sunglasses

Clubmaster sunglasses

Radiation protection
farfetch.com

$ 94.00

Firenze travel bag

Firenze travel bag

Brics
nordstrom.com

$ 525.00

AirTag

Portable charger

Linen blend polo sweater

Linen blend polo sweater

theory
Bloomingdales.com

$ 195.00

Gold vermeil signet ring

Gold vermeil signet ring

Miansai
mrporter.com

$ 165.00

Reverse suede loafers

Reverse suede loafers

Fear of god
mrporter.com

$ 695.00

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Men’s Health

COVID-19 infection could lead to damaged testes, study finds

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Some men have reported having testicular pain after developing COVID-19.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention doesn’t list testicular pain, which isn’t a common COVID-19 symptom. But previous research has identified traces of the coronavirus in the testicles of men who have died from COVID-19. And a new study deepens scientists ‘knowledge of the virus’ ability to affect different parts of the body.

Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch found that the coronavirus is able to infect the male genital tract of hamsters. Because hamsters tend to develop symptoms similar to humans, the researchers believe their results might help explain the testicular pain that some men have reported. The results can also represent what might happen to men with mild or moderate infections.

The study, published in the medical journal Microorganisms, found the virus in the testes of all infected hamsters in the first week of the study. The virus was detected in testicular samples without tissue changes for up to one month after infection. Then it finally went away.

The researchers also discovered virus replication in hamster testicular cells.

Previous studies have shown that the virus can damage the human genital tract, decrease testosterone production, and significantly disrupt the testes at the cellular level through the presence of immune cells.

“Given the magnitude of the COVID-19 pandemic, it is important to study how this disease can affect the testes and the potential implications for disease severity, reproductive health and sexual transmission,” said lead study author Dr. Rafael Kroon Campos, a postdoctoral fellow.

However, the underlying mechanisms and evidence for virus replication in male testicular cells are not currently available, the researchers said.

“These results are the first step in understanding how COVID-19 affects the male genital tract and potentially male reproductive health,” said study author Dr. Shannan Rossi, Professor of Pathology and Microbiology and Immunology. “We still have a lot of work to do before we have a full picture. In the future, we’ll look at ways to mitigate these effects, including the use of antivirals, antibody therapies and vaccines.”

University of Texas researchers were asked to investigate the link after studying the effects of Zika virus on the testes for several years.

Late last year, researchers from the University of Miami determined that it “makes sense” that the testes be a target of the coronavirus because of their affinity for a certain type of receptor found in many organs in the body, including the heart and lungs would, intestines, kidneys and testicles.

Other viruses can affect sperm production and lead to inflamed testicles, the Miami Herald reported earlier this year. Mumps can cause fertility problems in 10 to 20% of men who become infected.

Some research has found that COVID-19 can reduce sperm counts, but scientists have warned against placing too much emphasis on these results. It is possible that drugs or other conditions such as obesity could lead to low sperm counts. And they find that getting sick from a virus, including the flu, can cause temporary reductions.

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Men’s Health

How Sean Garner is Making a Remarkable Impact in the Fitness Community

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Health and fitness are paramount to leading a great life. As the internet gives us more connections with fitness professionals than ever before, it offers a plethora of opportunities to start an online fitness business. However, running an online fitness business can be a challenge.

The industry is inundated with professionals each offering the next best. However, if you want to become a successful online or personal gym owner or trainer, you have to do it differently from everyone else. You need to have a unique presence in order to attract and retain your dream clientele as loyal, enthusiastic fans. Upscaling is not an easy task unless you have the right guidance from an experienced professional.

Sean Garner, the power behind it EntreFit.com, is committed to helping fitness trainers and gym owners grow their businesses. Sean knows exactly what to do in a fitness training business as he has been in the industry for over 11 years. He understands how hard it can be to stand out from the crowd, and as a seasoned fitness business coach, you will see your business create the online presence you know deserves.

In his 11 year experience, Sean has owned and successfully run multiple fitness businesses including 2 CrossFit gyms, an outdoor boot camp, and an athletic performance / functional training center. He also has extensive fitness training experience having worked as an S&C trainer for the Winnipeg Jets EHCL team.

Sean practices what he preaches, has expanded his expertise in writing and as a fitness advisor for Men’s Health Magazine, and is also the creator of the 6 weeks Sweat Off Men’s Health DVD and app products. Sean is the lead developer of The Playbook App and Project DadBod, an online fitness coaching program.

At the EntreFit, Sean and his team will introduce you to proven digital marketing systems to help you grow your training business. He will also teach you the tricks of the trade that will help you stop drowning in the unproductive pools of influencers. Sean will teach you how to incorporate consistent systems into your fitness training strategy and with his guidance you will stop convincing clients of your worth as a fitness trainer. What is more? Sean shows you how to manage your time so you can accomplish more in less time.

Sean will help you grow your online brand, but also cover topics like building and marketing your online fitness business and introducing you to the systems you need to grow and scale. He will also cover sales, create a quote or product, set goals, and adopt an entrepreneurial mindset. By the end of the interaction, you’ve also learned how to find your dream clients and the best practices for your online fitness business.

Sean’s influence on the fitness community has changed lives for many. If you are a gym owner or personal trainer who has been in the industry for two or more years and want to run your business online, Sean Garner is the online fitness business coach you need to contact.

This content is provided to you by Lewis Schenk.

Photo provided by the author.

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