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Lebanon County real estate transfers for week of June 7

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The following property transfers have recently been recorded in Lebanon County:

Lebanon

Curtis H. Zimmerman to Stellar Real Estate LLC, 423 N. Sixth St., $ 128,000.

Matthew J. and Megan E. Gilbert to Ashton and Valerie Martin, 420 S. Twelfth St., $ 138,000.

Dane C. Warfield to Rosmery Martinez, 610 N. Seventh St., $ 168,000.

Leroy and Barbara Hartman to Franmy Reyes-Garcia, 364 N. Fourth St., $ 103,000.

Amos G. Fisher to MSS Rentals LLC, 823 Mifflin St., $ 143,000.

Elizabeth B. Heiligman Estate to German V. Ramirez Sr. and Lusilbania Cabrera, 616 Cornwall Road, $ 160,000.

George K. Shaak Sr. estate to Angel Rosario, Yiemy Gabirel, Miguel Rosario, 122 N. Tenth St., $ 65,000.

Autumn B. Streiff and Joshua Streiff to Conrad C. Burkholder, 14 Canal St., $ 110,400.

Marvin W. Stoudt Estate to Rafael E. Ferrer and Clara L. Defiver, 431 Lehman St., $ 79,000.

Brock L. Hower Estate to David A. Lapp, 1011 N. Eighth St., $ 100,000.

Northern Lebanon Township

Kneasel Farms LLC to James J. Cikovic, property in Northern Lebanon Township, to James J. Cikovic, property in Northern Lebanon Township, $ 310,000.

Landmark Homes at Sweetbriar Inc. to Eugene W. and Susan R. Althouse, 412 Orchid Circle, $ 379,500.

Heriberto and Marie Pacheco to Joshua D. and Samantha L, Koch, 914 Maple Lane, $ 199,900.

Landmark Homes at Sweetbriar Inc. to Thomas Jones and Daryl Jones, 432 Orchid Circle, $ 310,916.

Township South Lebanon

Anna Ilgenfritz to Hurst Rentals, 618 E. Walnut St., $ 84,500.

Lebanon Valley Economic Development Corporation to Master Freeze and Distribution LLC, property on Ritter Way, $ 904,726.40.

Cornwall

Michael A. Reb to Linford B. and Lynette S. Weaver, Nathan A. Weaver, 104 Park St., $ 177,000.

Carl D. and Carol E. Scillia to Damon V. and Nicole R. Ronco, 123 Iron Valley Drive, $ 699,900.

William B. Hartmann to Homes Fore Life LLC, lot on North 25th St., $ 112,000.

Dennis Flickinger to Craig A. Hill and Michael D. Snider, 1217 Mosaic Drive, $ 389,900.

Kevin M. and Linda Hunsecker to Kevin J. and Amy S. Keller, 1709 Hickory Drive, $ 360,000.

West Cornwall parish

Lamar L. Stutzman to Adam Aleck LLC, property on Old Mine Road, $ 241,000.

Lamar L. Stutzman to Edward and Denise Bollard, 181 Old Mine Road, $ 419,000.

Adam Alex LLC to Paul E. and Carol M. Williams, 145 Old Mine Road, $ 120,000.

Cornwall Associates LP, Alden Homes at Cornwall Inc. to Larry D. and Patricia H. Singer, 1102 Alden Way, $ 250,000.

North Cornwall parish

Builder Services Group Inc. t / a Kenneth Home to Phillip Morlang, 732 Farmwood Lane, $ 177,060.

3 Sons Properties LLC, Pine Hill at Lebanon LLC, lot on Shadow Creek Drive to Brendan Cawley and Greta Cawley, $ 125,000.

Kenneth A. Pushnik Estate to Michael and Karen Gerhart, Carlton Drive 1801, $ 145,000.

Narrows Glen Inc. to Monica J. Bryant, 57 Creekside Drive, $ 341,500.

Cleona

Paul A. Amoratis to Clara Suggs, 207 W. Walnut St., $ 252,000.

South Annville Township

Garman Builder in Mayapple to Andrew J. Scurto, owned in South Annville Township, $ 268,990.

Annville

The Mary Jane Beazley Trust to Christa L. Aycock, 147 Station Corner Drive, $ 335,000.

Integrity First Home Buyers to Kathryn M. Sullivan and Susie C. Lee, 403 W. Queen St., $ 190,000.

Matthew T. and Rebecca A. Drye to Randolph Williams, 459-461 E. Main St. $ 255,000.

South Londonderry township

Elaine E. Winters to Adam J. and Samantha L. Fay, 2060 S. Forge Road, $ 250,000.

Alexhih Realty to Christopher and Natasha Breen, owned on Hummingbird Way, $ 139,900.

David B. Gorrell to Caitlyn and Jessie Munson, 521 Brookwood Drive, $ 220,000.

Robert A. and Sandia a. DeCarlo to Michael and Stephanie L. McKain, 422 Old Farm Road, $ 350,000.

River Bend LP, Millfield Construction Co., at Judith A. Dooley, 501 Springbrook Drive, $ 360,842.

Palmyra

Rudolph Jr. and Marcia S. Sharpe to Erin McGarrity, East Maple Street lot, $ 152,000.

Tambra M. and Scott A. Hopple to Rebecca J. Harrell, 407 N. Railroad St., $ 163,500.

Dalane Management LLC to SERP LLC, 128-130 E. Main St., $ 450,000.

House Cash LLC to David S. Martin, 119 W. Main St., $ 185,000.

David G. Pryal to Oscar Varela-Plaza, 217 S. Harrison St., $ 179,950.

North Londonderry township

Kurt A. and Stefanie A. Yordy to GS Properties and Holdings, 755-757 S. Railroad St., $ 193,000.

Hope R. and Andrew B. Sorey to Forest Lai and Rensa Chen, 20 Limestone Lane, $ 395,000.

Kenneth J. and Kathryn M. Long to Corey D. Burns and Kayla Burns, 1370 Duke St., $ 285,000.

Carole A. Hess at Landmark Homes at Summer Layne LLC (of Ephrata, PA), 101.3863 acres along Hoffer Road, $ 4,232.00.

Harry E. and Annette E. Buck of Landmark Homes at Pinnacle LLC (of Ephrata), lot along Killinger Road, 98,552 acres, $ 4,336,288.

Union Township

Samuel E. Webb Estate to Kevin J. Rivera, 307 AWOL Road, $ 255,200,

Franklin D. Bohr Estate, Marla Rugel, to Kevin R. Royer Sr., Kevin R. Royer Jr., 221 Greenpoint Road, $ 154,000.

Jonestown

Nathan W. Long to Evelin De La Cruz, 113 Crekview Drive, $ 224,900.

Swatara

Clarence V. Michael to Edward Z. Jr. and Hanna Hoover, 2169 Quarry Road, $ 580,000.

Woodcrest Developers LLC to Betty J. Bettinger, 507 Darlington Ave., $ 331,000.

Bethel Congregation

Laura M. Anspach Estate to Palmyra Homes Inc., property on Sherwin Williams Drive,

$ 450,000.

Joyce Myers to BAM Property Group, 114 Poplar St, $ 392,500.

Jackson Township

Clair G and Erma G. Martin to Richard L. and Ann M. Krieser, property on East Lincoln Avenue, $ 5,000.

Karie E. Umbenhauer to Jose Espinoza and Lenny Tejada, 91 Deep Run Road, $ 200,000.

Bridget A. and Francis Severino to James and Deborah Puorro, 7 Bayberry Court, $ 146,900.

Marcia A. Jumper, Kristin K. Winters, Elaine L. Schutt, to Sunny Cooper LLC, Washington Street property, $ 235,000.

John D. and Esther Castellani to Jade and Louis Biempica, 100 W. Colonial Ave., $ 303,000.

Heidelberg community

Michael T. Ginder to Matthew J. Moore and Jessica T. Pfautz, High Street Estate, $ 135,000.

Millcreek parish

Judith A. Waldron to Emily E. Chaugue, 22 Cottage Lane, $ 230,000.

Walter B. and Irene Shirk to Mark and Leslie A. Mitstifer, 5 Hillside Drive, $ 225,000.

Gary and Nancy Hever to Thomas E. Jr. and Erin L. Price, 60 N. Sheridan Road, $ 67,250.

Shelly Stallsmith is a trend reporter for the York Daily Record. She can be reached at mstallsmith@ydr.com or followed on Twitter at @ShelStallsmith.

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Real estate license fees are expected to increase | News, Sports, Jobs

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Real estate agents and real estate agents are likely to face increased license fees.

Earlier this week, the state assembly passed A.5363 by 113-35 votes, with Reps Andrew Goodell, R-Jamestown, and Joe Giglio, R-Gowanda, voting against the measure. The state Senate passed an accompanying bill in February, S.2133, by 45-17 votes, with Senator George Borrello, R-Gowanda, voting against. Real estate agent fees increase by $ 30 while real estate agent fees increase by $ 10. The increased money will be used for fair apartment tests across the state.

“It reminds me of the motto of our state -“Wood wool“- which, as you all know, always means upwards.” said Goodell. “It seems that this is the motto we have when it comes to fees and expenses, and I’m a little different than when that motto was first chosen when we talked about economic opportunity and moving up . It may be a small amount, but it is another fee and increase that we are putting on this troubled industry and for that reason I will be protesting against it and recommending the same to my colleagues. “

MP Kimberly Jean-Pierre, D-Lindenhurst and sponsor of the assembly’s draft law, said paired tests are a tool to detect and eliminate discrimination in housing. She said mechanisms such as coded language, guidance, unequal service provision and higher financial demands on minorities would be used to maintain housing segregation. The introduction of a surcharge on broker and agent license fees would provide funding for nationwide efforts to ensure fair home testing, including, but not limited to, the couples testing practice.

Jean-Pierre also quoted a 2019 story in Newsday entitled “Long Island Divided” who blamed the housing discrimination on explicit and implicit bias in the real estate industry. The newspaper series reported that some Long Island real estate agents directed customers to specific neighborhoods based on their perceived race or ethnicity. In response, the Nassau district appointed a special commissioner for housing, promised increased enforcement of open living laws, strengthened the Nassau district human rights commission and established an advisory board for fair housing. Suffolk County hired an outside agency to test for discrimination in housing, strengthened the county’s Human Rights Commission, and began raising awareness of fair housing laws.

“Two years ago, Newsday published worrying results from a three-year investigation that uncovered widespread segregation and unequal treatment of potential minority and minority homebuyers in Long Island.” said Jean-Pierre. “This research confirmed what many of us already know to be true – that there are certain bad actors in real estate agencies who discriminate against people of color and draw certain people into certain communities based on their skin color – a practice that has no place in our society. … When we look at how our communities and school districts are separated, it is one of the reasons that districts in low-income communities cannot get the resources they fairly deserve because we had brokers like this one, the people of life held in a community because of their skin color and financial history. This will allow us to allocate a certain fund – and not raise taxes – but it will allocate a certain fund through the attorney general to run fairer tests in our great state of New York so that people of color can live where they want and don’t have to worry that there will be bad actors. If there are any, they will be punished. “

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Real Estate License Fees To Increase | News, Sports, Jobs

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Real estate agents and real estate agents are likely to face increased license fees.

Earlier this week, the state assembly passed A.5363 by 113-35 votes, with Reps Andrew Goodell, R-Jamestown, and Joe Giglio, R-Gowanda, voting against the measure. The state Senate passed an accompanying bill in February, S.2133, by 45-17 votes, with Senator George Borrello, R-Gowanda, voting against. Real estate agent fees increase by $ 30 while real estate agent fees increase by $ 10. The increased money will be used for fair apartment tests across the state.

“It reminds me of the motto of our state -“Wood wool“- which, as you all know, always means upwards.” said Goodell. “It seems that this is the motto we have when it comes to fees and expenses, and I’m a little different than when that motto was first chosen when we talked about economic opportunity and moving up . It may be a small amount, but it is another fee and increase that we are putting on this troubled industry and for that reason I will be protesting against it and recommending the same to my colleagues. “

MP Kimberly Jean-Pierre, D-Lindenhurst and sponsor of the assembly’s draft law, said paired tests are a tool to detect and eliminate discrimination in housing. She said mechanisms such as coded language, guidance, unequal service provision and higher financial demands on minorities would be used to maintain housing segregation. The introduction of a surcharge on broker and agent license fees would provide funding for nationwide efforts to ensure fair home testing, including, but not limited to, the couples testing practice.

Jean-Pierre also quoted a 2019 story in Newsday entitled “Long Island Divided” who blamed the housing discrimination on explicit and implicit bias in the real estate industry. The newspaper series reported that some Long Island real estate agents directed customers to specific neighborhoods based on their perceived race or ethnicity. In response, the Nassau district appointed a special commissioner for housing, promised increased enforcement of open living laws, strengthened the Nassau district human rights commission and established an advisory board for fair housing.

Suffolk County hired an outside agency to test for discrimination in housing, strengthened the county’s Human Rights Commission, and began raising awareness of fair housing laws.

“Two years ago, Newsday published worrying results from a three-year investigation that uncovered widespread segregation and unequal treatment of potential minority and minority homebuyers in Long Island.” said Jean-Pierre. “This research confirmed what many of us already know to be true – that there are certain bad actors in real estate agencies who discriminate against people of color and draw certain people into certain communities based on their skin color – a practice that has no place in our society. … When we look at how our communities and school districts are separated, it is one of the reasons that districts in low-income communities cannot get the resources they fairly deserve because we had brokers like this one, the people of life held in a community because of their skin color and financial history. This will allow us to allocate a certain fund – and not raise taxes – but it will allocate a certain fund through the attorney general to run fairer tests in our great state of New York so that people of color can live where they want and don’t have to worry that there will be bad actors. If there are any, they will be punished. “

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Florida men, their Coral Springs FL firm, a $2 million fraud

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Two South Florida men agreed to pay likely millions of dollars after the Securities and Exchange Commission charged them with inventing a $ 2.4 million appetizer for South Florida white-collar crime: Ponzi-scheme real estate fraud.

Legally, neither Larry Brodman of Coral Springs nor Anthony Nicolosi of Lake Worth admit any of the allegations in the SEC complaint filed against them in federal court in Fort Lauderdale. The fact that they quickly agreed to pay a “skimming off of illegally acquired profits” as well as interest and a civil penalty speaks for itself.

The SEC said Brodman used unregistered securities offerings to raise $ 9.06 million for real estate investors, and the company would use that money to buy residential properties and convert them into rental properties.

“In reality, Brodman embezzled approximately $ 1.12 million in investor funds that were diverted to his personal account,” according to the SEC complaint. “Brodman, PII and the Property Entities also misused approximately $ 1.2 million in investor funds by paying sales commissions to sales agents, including Nicolosi, despite the fact that the listing materials stated that commissions would only be paid to licensed brokers.

“Some of the” profits “distributed to investors were actually payments funded by other investors, and there was extensive commingling of investor money.”

Property Income Investments, Brodman and Anthony Two-Names

According to state records, Brodman founded Property Income Investors (PII) in March 2016.

PII marketed itself as a “real estate investment company based in South Florida with a focus on turnkey apartment buildings”.

For each property purchased, Brodman created a separate company and named it Property Income Investors and added a number. The eight-part Coral Springs building at 3050 Coral Springs Dr. was bought by Property Income Investors 304, for example. In its complaint, the SEC referred to the 10 companies collectively as “the ownership units”.

According to the SEC, Nicolosi, who was once known as Anthony Peluso, was the top-selling agent for PII and the property entities. He was a registered agent with 18 SEC-registered broker-dealers from 1994 to 2000.

The SEC complaint states that Anthony Peluso legally changed his name to “Anthony Nicolosi” to cover his tracks after the National Association of Securities Dealers permanently banned him from associating with a member for lying to customers and sales tactics were under high pressure. He received a cease and desist order from the Alabama Securities Commission in 2010, in part for failing to notify clients of his name change and NASD action.

Where did the money come from and where the money went

The SEC complaint said Property Income Investors raised $ 9.06 million from 156 investors in 26 states from January 2016 to September 2020. Investors were told Brodman and investors would have a 30-70 percent split on rental income and 50-50 percent on property sales.

About $ 4.1 million went towards the purchase of 12 properties, which range from $ 265,000 to $ 1.25 million, according to the SEC. According to Broward County records, the aforementioned 3050 Coral Springs Dr. building was sold for $ 1.25 million on August 29, 2019. Another $ 752,000 was spent on renovating and maintaining the property.

PII and Property Entities sold three of the properties and took about $ 1.04 million in rent for the other.

“The companies have not distributed any profits from property sales to investors,” says the complaint. “Based on the information in the Offer Document, Brodman was entitled to a maximum total of approximately $ 312,000 as his share of the Company’s profits.

“But even after settling that $ 312,000, Brodman embezzled approximately $ 1.12 million in investor funds that were diverted to his personal account.”

Investors have been advised that licensed brokers may receive “up to 10% of proceeds” in commissions, the SEC said. However, the agency indicated that none of the brokers were licensed by PII and the $ 1.2 million spent on commissions exceeded 10% of the $ 9.06 million raised.

In addition, “at least $ 124,000” flowed back to some investors as profits, according to the SEC, in fact payments from later investors. The same was claimed by two 2020 investors for “a substantial portion of $ 460,000.”

“In total, PII, Property Entities and Brodman misused and misused about $ 2.44 million of the proceeds from the issue,” said the SEC.

Since 1989, David J. Neal’s domain at the Miami Herald has expanded to include writing about panthers (NHL and FIU), dolphins, old school animation, food safety, fraud, naughty lawyers, bad doctors, and all kinds of breaking news. He drinks coladas whole. He doesn’t work on Indianapolis 500 Race Day.

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