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The best in commercial real estate – 16th annual Summit Awards winners

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16th annual Summit Awards logo.

In a year that has turned the world upside down, the Summit Awards Committee is excited to announce this year’s winners for performance and excellence in commercial real estate in northern Nevada.

This year’s Summit Awards virtual presentation showcased the very best our industry has to offer in construction, development, brokerage and other notable industry achievements.

While we weren’t able to plan a personal event this year, our committee, along with CCIM, NAIOP, Nevada Builders Alliance (NBA) and CREW, is geared towards hosting our attendees at next year’s biggest and best Summit Awards yet.

For the past two decades, the Summit Awards have been hosted by these four leading commercial real estate organizations and are the premier awards event in northern Nevada. This year we celebrated the projects and people who made it to the top in 2020.

Our construction awards include categories for design professionals, subcontractors and general contractors of the year. We honored these winners for their hard work and dedication to the industry and their goodwill within the community.

Broker Awards are given to the best performing specialists in the categories of industry, office, retail, investment, land and generalists, as well as a rising star. The largest single lease, the largest sales transaction and the overall transactions of a single commercial real estate office are honored with the highest awards to the Broker of the Year.

Developers and their 2020 projects receive high accolades in multiple categories including industrial, medical practices, apartment buildings, offices, retail, and redevelopment / major tenant improvements.

Last year was a challenging one for commercial real estate, and for this alone, the developers honored this year – and everyone who entered each category – deserve praise for their strengths.

Our last Specialty Awards categories recognize the individual achievements of the property manager and NAIOP Developing Leader of the year as well as the Extra Mile Award.

The person who has been most actively promoting the advancement of women in the highly competitive commercial real estate space is named Katie Morrison CREW Ambassador of the Year. This ambassador exemplifies the fairness and qualities of helping others both within commercial real estate and in the community.

The Summit Awards Committee thanks the sponsors for this virtual event and congratulates the 2020 winners! We appreciate the continued support from members of the Nevada Builders Alliance, CREW, NAIOP, and CCIM. They are more important than ever in a persistently uncertain economic and regulatory environment.

And the winners are …

Northern Nevada Business Weekly, in partnership with the Summit Awards Committee and the Nevada Builders Alliance, CREW, NAIOP and CCIM, published a special section announcing the winners of the 16th annual Summit Awards on June 9th.

Click here to view the full digital edition, which includes descriptions and details of each award.

The list of 2020 Summit Awards winners is shown below. Visit www.SummitAwards.org to learn more:

SPECIAL AWARDS

  • Katie Morrison Crew Ambassador of the Year: Doug Roberts, Panattoni Developmentatt
  • Property Manager of the Year: Corry Castaneda, Dickson Commercial Group
  • Extra Mile Award: Brent Nasset, Kimley Horn
  • NAIOP Developing Leader of the Year: Nick Knecht, Dickson Commercial Group

CONSTRUCTION AWADS

  • Design professional of the year: OneStudio D + A
  • Subcontractor of the year: Helix Electric
  • General Contractor of the Year: Devcon Construction

DEVELOPMENT PRICES

  • Office Development of the Year: Slide Mountain Office Building, Devcon Construction
  • Public Use Development of the Year: Reno Ice, Helix Electric
  • Doctor’s Office of the Year Development: Center For Hope, Tanamera Construction
  • Mixed Use of the Year: The Village at Rancharrah, Tolles Development Company
  • Industrial Development of the Year: Project Tusk – DLV3, Panattoni Development Company
  • Apartment Building Of The Year: Carson Hills Apartments, Tanamera Construction
  • Office remodeling of the year: Ridgeline, OneStudio D + A
  • Renovation of the doctor’s practice of the year: Renowned pediatric special care, OneStudio D + A
  • Retail Refurbishment of the Year: Bank Saloon, Miles Construction
  • Mixed Use of the Year: The Club in Rancharrah, Helix Electric

BROKER AWARDS

  • Rising Star Broker of the Year: Logic Commercial Real Estate, Michael Keating
  • Biggest sales deal of the year: Kidder Mathews, Michael Nevis, Michael Hoeck and Steve Kucera
  • Generalist Broker of the Year: Chase Johnson Commercial, Ryan Johnson
  • Office Agent of the Year: Colliers International, Melissa Molyneaux
  • Investment Broker of the Year: Marcus & Millichap, Ryan Rife
  • Total transactions by brokerage house: CBRE
  • Land Broker of the Year: Archcrest Commercial Partners, Mark Krueger and Ryan Krueger
  • Biggest leasing deal of the year: Kidder Mathews, Michael Nevis, Michael Hoeck and Steve Kucera
  • Retail Broker of the Year: LOGIC Commercial Real Estate, Ian Cochran and Greg Ruzzine
  • Commercial Lender of the Year: Harvest Small Business Finance, Cindy Santilena
  • Overall Agent of the Year: Kidder Mathews, Michael Nevis, Michael Hoeck and Steve Kucera
  • Industrial Broker of the Year: Kidder Mathews, Michael Nevis, Michael Hoeck, and Steve Kucera

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Real estate license fees are expected to increase | News, Sports, Jobs

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Real estate agents and real estate agents are likely to face increased license fees.

Earlier this week, the state assembly passed A.5363 by 113-35 votes, with Reps Andrew Goodell, R-Jamestown, and Joe Giglio, R-Gowanda, voting against the measure. The state Senate passed an accompanying bill in February, S.2133, by 45-17 votes, with Senator George Borrello, R-Gowanda, voting against. Real estate agent fees increase by $ 30 while real estate agent fees increase by $ 10. The increased money will be used for fair apartment tests across the state.

“It reminds me of the motto of our state -“Wood wool“- which, as you all know, always means upwards.” said Goodell. “It seems that this is the motto we have when it comes to fees and expenses, and I’m a little different than when that motto was first chosen when we talked about economic opportunity and moving up . It may be a small amount, but it is another fee and increase that we are putting on this troubled industry and for that reason I will be protesting against it and recommending the same to my colleagues. “

MP Kimberly Jean-Pierre, D-Lindenhurst and sponsor of the assembly’s draft law, said paired tests are a tool to detect and eliminate discrimination in housing. She said mechanisms such as coded language, guidance, unequal service provision and higher financial demands on minorities would be used to maintain housing segregation. The introduction of a surcharge on broker and agent license fees would provide funding for nationwide efforts to ensure fair home testing, including, but not limited to, the couples testing practice.

Jean-Pierre also quoted a 2019 story in Newsday entitled “Long Island Divided” who blamed the housing discrimination on explicit and implicit bias in the real estate industry. The newspaper series reported that some Long Island real estate agents directed customers to specific neighborhoods based on their perceived race or ethnicity. In response, the Nassau district appointed a special commissioner for housing, promised increased enforcement of open living laws, strengthened the Nassau district human rights commission and established an advisory board for fair housing. Suffolk County hired an outside agency to test for discrimination in housing, strengthened the county’s Human Rights Commission, and began raising awareness of fair housing laws.

“Two years ago, Newsday published worrying results from a three-year investigation that uncovered widespread segregation and unequal treatment of potential minority and minority homebuyers in Long Island.” said Jean-Pierre. “This research confirmed what many of us already know to be true – that there are certain bad actors in real estate agencies who discriminate against people of color and draw certain people into certain communities based on their skin color – a practice that has no place in our society. … When we look at how our communities and school districts are separated, it is one of the reasons that districts in low-income communities cannot get the resources they fairly deserve because we had brokers like this one, the people of life held in a community because of their skin color and financial history. This will allow us to allocate a certain fund – and not raise taxes – but it will allocate a certain fund through the attorney general to run fairer tests in our great state of New York so that people of color can live where they want and don’t have to worry that there will be bad actors. If there are any, they will be punished. “

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Real Estate License Fees To Increase | News, Sports, Jobs

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Real estate agents and real estate agents are likely to face increased license fees.

Earlier this week, the state assembly passed A.5363 by 113-35 votes, with Reps Andrew Goodell, R-Jamestown, and Joe Giglio, R-Gowanda, voting against the measure. The state Senate passed an accompanying bill in February, S.2133, by 45-17 votes, with Senator George Borrello, R-Gowanda, voting against. Real estate agent fees increase by $ 30 while real estate agent fees increase by $ 10. The increased money will be used for fair apartment tests across the state.

“It reminds me of the motto of our state -“Wood wool“- which, as you all know, always means upwards.” said Goodell. “It seems that this is the motto we have when it comes to fees and expenses, and I’m a little different than when that motto was first chosen when we talked about economic opportunity and moving up . It may be a small amount, but it is another fee and increase that we are putting on this troubled industry and for that reason I will be protesting against it and recommending the same to my colleagues. “

MP Kimberly Jean-Pierre, D-Lindenhurst and sponsor of the assembly’s draft law, said paired tests are a tool to detect and eliminate discrimination in housing. She said mechanisms such as coded language, guidance, unequal service provision and higher financial demands on minorities would be used to maintain housing segregation. The introduction of a surcharge on broker and agent license fees would provide funding for nationwide efforts to ensure fair home testing, including, but not limited to, the couples testing practice.

Jean-Pierre also quoted a 2019 story in Newsday entitled “Long Island Divided” who blamed the housing discrimination on explicit and implicit bias in the real estate industry. The newspaper series reported that some Long Island real estate agents directed customers to specific neighborhoods based on their perceived race or ethnicity. In response, the Nassau district appointed a special commissioner for housing, promised increased enforcement of open living laws, strengthened the Nassau district human rights commission and established an advisory board for fair housing.

Suffolk County hired an outside agency to test for discrimination in housing, strengthened the county’s Human Rights Commission, and began raising awareness of fair housing laws.

“Two years ago, Newsday published worrying results from a three-year investigation that uncovered widespread segregation and unequal treatment of potential minority and minority homebuyers in Long Island.” said Jean-Pierre. “This research confirmed what many of us already know to be true – that there are certain bad actors in real estate agencies who discriminate against people of color and draw certain people into certain communities based on their skin color – a practice that has no place in our society. … When we look at how our communities and school districts are separated, it is one of the reasons that districts in low-income communities cannot get the resources they fairly deserve because we had brokers like this one, the people of life held in a community because of their skin color and financial history. This will allow us to allocate a certain fund – and not raise taxes – but it will allocate a certain fund through the attorney general to run fairer tests in our great state of New York so that people of color can live where they want and don’t have to worry that there will be bad actors. If there are any, they will be punished. “

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Florida men, their Coral Springs FL firm, a $2 million fraud

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Two South Florida men agreed to pay likely millions of dollars after the Securities and Exchange Commission charged them with inventing a $ 2.4 million appetizer for South Florida white-collar crime: Ponzi-scheme real estate fraud.

Legally, neither Larry Brodman of Coral Springs nor Anthony Nicolosi of Lake Worth admit any of the allegations in the SEC complaint filed against them in federal court in Fort Lauderdale. The fact that they quickly agreed to pay a “skimming off of illegally acquired profits” as well as interest and a civil penalty speaks for itself.

The SEC said Brodman used unregistered securities offerings to raise $ 9.06 million for real estate investors, and the company would use that money to buy residential properties and convert them into rental properties.

“In reality, Brodman embezzled approximately $ 1.12 million in investor funds that were diverted to his personal account,” according to the SEC complaint. “Brodman, PII and the Property Entities also misused approximately $ 1.2 million in investor funds by paying sales commissions to sales agents, including Nicolosi, despite the fact that the listing materials stated that commissions would only be paid to licensed brokers.

“Some of the” profits “distributed to investors were actually payments funded by other investors, and there was extensive commingling of investor money.”

Property Income Investments, Brodman and Anthony Two-Names

According to state records, Brodman founded Property Income Investors (PII) in March 2016.

PII marketed itself as a “real estate investment company based in South Florida with a focus on turnkey apartment buildings”.

For each property purchased, Brodman created a separate company and named it Property Income Investors and added a number. The eight-part Coral Springs building at 3050 Coral Springs Dr. was bought by Property Income Investors 304, for example. In its complaint, the SEC referred to the 10 companies collectively as “the ownership units”.

According to the SEC, Nicolosi, who was once known as Anthony Peluso, was the top-selling agent for PII and the property entities. He was a registered agent with 18 SEC-registered broker-dealers from 1994 to 2000.

The SEC complaint states that Anthony Peluso legally changed his name to “Anthony Nicolosi” to cover his tracks after the National Association of Securities Dealers permanently banned him from associating with a member for lying to customers and sales tactics were under high pressure. He received a cease and desist order from the Alabama Securities Commission in 2010, in part for failing to notify clients of his name change and NASD action.

Where did the money come from and where the money went

The SEC complaint said Property Income Investors raised $ 9.06 million from 156 investors in 26 states from January 2016 to September 2020. Investors were told Brodman and investors would have a 30-70 percent split on rental income and 50-50 percent on property sales.

About $ 4.1 million went towards the purchase of 12 properties, which range from $ 265,000 to $ 1.25 million, according to the SEC. According to Broward County records, the aforementioned 3050 Coral Springs Dr. building was sold for $ 1.25 million on August 29, 2019. Another $ 752,000 was spent on renovating and maintaining the property.

PII and Property Entities sold three of the properties and took about $ 1.04 million in rent for the other.

“The companies have not distributed any profits from property sales to investors,” says the complaint. “Based on the information in the Offer Document, Brodman was entitled to a maximum total of approximately $ 312,000 as his share of the Company’s profits.

“But even after settling that $ 312,000, Brodman embezzled approximately $ 1.12 million in investor funds that were diverted to his personal account.”

Investors have been advised that licensed brokers may receive “up to 10% of proceeds” in commissions, the SEC said. However, the agency indicated that none of the brokers were licensed by PII and the $ 1.2 million spent on commissions exceeded 10% of the $ 9.06 million raised.

In addition, “at least $ 124,000” flowed back to some investors as profits, according to the SEC, in fact payments from later investors. The same was claimed by two 2020 investors for “a substantial portion of $ 460,000.”

“In total, PII, Property Entities and Brodman misused and misused about $ 2.44 million of the proceeds from the issue,” said the SEC.

Since 1989, David J. Neal’s domain at the Miami Herald has expanded to include writing about panthers (NHL and FIU), dolphins, old school animation, food safety, fraud, naughty lawyers, bad doctors, and all kinds of breaking news. He drinks coladas whole. He doesn’t work on Indianapolis 500 Race Day.

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