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Woman left with half a skull after jumping from Yorkshire bridge

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A Yorkshire student brave the odds and miraculously recovered after throwing herself off a footbridge in the midst of depression.

Despite having half a skull, Kayleigh Moore managed to change her life after a difficult battle.

The 23-year-old jumped off a pedestrian bridge over an expressway near Hull on April 17 last year after several previous suicide attempts.

A passing motorist found her after initially holding her on the street for a piece of rolled up carpet, Hull Live reports.

For the latest Yorkshire Live email updates, click here.

Kayleigh’s father was the police officer on duty that night, responding to driver’s 999 call when one of his colleagues who arrived at the scene recognized the victim as his daughter Kayleigh and asked him to inform and redirect him.

Her mother, an intensive care nurse, was also on shift that night. She was informed of the news when Kayleigh was taken to the Hull Royal Infirmary, where a trauma team in Resus was working on her.

It was easy for the next fortnight. Kayleigh suffered extensive trauma, swelling, and a cerebral haemorrhage that led to a stroke; and she broke several ribs, bones on her face, ankle, foot, and wrist.

Kayleigh had two emergency brain surgeries to relieve pressure on her brain, and the surgeons performed a cranectomy – the removal of part of her skull.

Kayleigh spent two weeks in intensive care

Her desperate parents were allowed to sit by her bed despite Covid restrictions as doctors warned them that Kayleigh might not survive.

However, after two weeks, she began to wake up. It was the beginning of a long recovery that is now drawing to a close 14 months later.

Kayleigh, who studied nursing at Hull University, said she felt “lonely” from an early age and endured difficulties in school that she attributes to the beginning of her mental health struggle.

“I was pretty bullied from a young age, I was followed home from school and beaten up, and I was introverted, so I came home from school and was always alone.

“After school I went to Bishop Burton College, where I made some friends, but they all lived far away from me. It wasn’t until I got to Hull University that I made friends and thought everything was going in the right direction. “

However, Kayleigh dropped out of college early in her third year in October 2019 because her mental health deteriorated.

She was on the university’s mental health team, which she credits for being “amazing and always there for me,” and she was also among the NHS mental health team.

Kayleigh is feeling as good now as it has been in years

For the next three months she had walked in and out of the Avondale Mental Health Clinic of her own volition fearing for her own safety, but she was always discharged after a short stay.

She was also rushed to the Hull Royal Infirmary “five or six times” by ambulance after making further attempts at suicide.

But she remembers the night she jumped off the bridge between Hedon and Paull and says: “I don’t remember most of it because of the trauma. I know that I had seen the psychiatric team the day before, and i … said i have to fight.

“I contacted two friends and they suddenly said that I just stopped replying to text messages.

“I posted the word ‘sorry’ on my social media and kept this post to remind myself how far I’ve come.

“I also recorded a video that said ‘Sorry’ and then I jumped.

“It was late at night and a member of the public found me. My father was there that night and he had a student officer with him and he replied that it would be a good experience for the officer. One of the policemen who came I knew me , and my father was told to go and go to the hospital immediately.

“My mother worked in the intensive care unit and was called to Resus, where I was intubated and sedated by the trauma team. Both my parents were allowed to be by my side because the doctors didn’t know whether I would survive. “

Kayleigh Moore suffered a cerebral haemorrhage and a number of terrible injuries

For two weeks she was in the intensive care unit on a ventilator and was looked after by her mother’s colleagues.

In incredibly open posts on her public Instagram account, _kayleighlauren Kayleigh shows how painful her recovery was after learning to walk again with the help of physiotherapy.

Last October, she had a cranioplasty, which involved making a metal plate to replace the missing part of her skull, and hugging fabulous long wigs after having her head shaved for the operation.

“Half my head is made of metal now,” said Kayleigh.

Although she suffers from headaches as a result of her brain injury, she controls it with medication.

And although she still has pain every time she walks more than two or three kilometers, she keeps walking and improving; She’s back at the gym too, running and swimming.

Her incredible resilience is evident in her Instagram posts, which she created to help others struggling with suicidal thoughts.

Samaritans: Phone 116 123, 24 hours a day, or email jo@samaritans.org, in confidence

Platform 1 male community group: Support with problems such as psychological problems and addiction healing. Visit the website or call 01484 421143.

Andy’s Man Club: info@andysmanclub.co.uk

PAPYRUS: A voluntary organization that supports suicidal adolescents and young adults. Telephone 0800 068 4141

Mind: A charity that provides support and advice to people with mental health problems.

Bullying UK: A website for bullying children and adults. Click here

Campaign against an Unhappy Life (CALM): For young men who feel unhappy. There is a website and a hotline: 0800 58 58 58

MindOut: Provide mental health support and advice to members of LGBTQ communities. Telephone 01273 234839

“I’m following another report from someone who’s been through the same thing, and their posts have helped so many people.

I feel like if I can post about what I’ve been through and show how I’m doing now, that I can go out and yes I can go to the gym then people could see that.

And while it may be really difficult now, there is light at the end of the tunnel.

“People used to tell me that and I didn’t believe it, but I’m actually living this now, and if they can see it on my Instagram account, they might take it more seriously and listen.”

Despite her terrible trauma, Kayleigh considers herself the best in years. She is currently applying to return to university in September to resume her third year of nursing, pending approval from occupational medicine and her surgeon that she is well enough to return.

“I am more determined than ever to become a nurse. I think what I’ve been through will make me a better nurse too.

“I wish it had never happened, of course, because it was very traumatic for me and my family. But I also think if it hadn’t happened I wouldn’t realize what a fighter I am and what I’m worth I know that now. “

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She would like to thank all the medical professionals who saved her life that night.

And for anyone struggling with mental health issues, she urges them to force themselves to go outside, play sports, meet a friend, and talk to people.

“I used to hide my feelings and just stay home, I didn’t want to leave the house. I now know that this makes it so much worse. I can’t believe I’m out to socialize and close going “to the gym, it feels fantastic.

“I’m in such a better place now. I haven’t seen my own strength until now. I almost died, but I feel like I have a bright future ahead of me now. “

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Men’s Health

5 Track Workouts That Will Get You Out of the Gym

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Sprinters have the best physique in the world: Their bodies are made up of long, sinewy muscles that they can propel over the course at breathtaking speed. Why do so few people do track workouts? The facilities are easily accessible (many high and middle schools keep their lanes open to the public in the evenings and on weekends), and they’re not just for running, either. Most lanes have grassy infields, if not lined soccer fields, that can be used for shuttle runs and exercises that could otherwise be done in the gym.

Training on the track in the spring and autumn months or on summer evenings is often more comfortable than another overcrowded gym workout. And unlike your typical long, stationary jog on a treadmill, running on a distance is much more likely to improve strength and speed. Last but not least, it offers a welcome change from the gym and the opportunity to train outside.

Ready to start? Here’s a warm-up and five workouts you can do on the track and in the infield:

5 track workouts that will get you out of the gym

Warm up

  1. Cobra: Lie on your stomach (face down) on the infield grass. Squeeze your buttocks together and bring your shoulder blades back and down. With your thumbs up, arms turned out, and chin tucked in, lift and hold your chest for 2 seconds. Slowly lower to the floor and repeat 10 repetitions.
  2. Pelvic slope: This opens the hips and pelvis, which can become blocked from sitting too much. From a standing position with your hands on your hips and knees slightly bent, move your hips back and forth and tilt your pelvis. You should feel a stretch in your lower back. Be sure to move from your hips; don’t get out of step. This can also be done with your hands on the cross for more stretch. Tilt back and forth 10 times.
  3. Knee hug: Raise your right knee to your chest and reach under that knee with your hands. Pull the knee as close to your chest as possible while contracting your left gluteus muscle. Repeat on the other side. Do 10 on each side.
  4. Side lunge: Step right while keeping your toes straight and feet flat. Squat down by sitting back and on your right leg; Keep your left leg straight and your weight on your right metatarsus to your heel. Keeping your left leg straight, crouch down as low as you can and hold this position for 2 seconds. You can return to the starting position or slip to the next lunge by gradually moving to the right. Do 10 on each side.
  5. Ass kicks: From an athletic posture, crouch slightly as if you were sitting in a chair. Jump and bring your heels to the glutes. Do not arch your lower back. Land gently in an athletic position and repeat 10 reps.

Training session # 1

Directions: Repeat the following exercises four times for a total of 5 sets or 30 minutes.

  1. Warm-up run: Two laps around the track with 60 percent effort.
  2. Plank: Hold for 1 minute, rest for 30 seconds.
  3. Dips: Repeat for 1 minute, rest for 30 seconds (use a bench or bleachers).
  4. Lateral limits: Stand on your right leg with your left foot off the floor in balance. Squat slightly with your right leg, jump sideways to the left. Extend your ankles, knees, and hips and land on your left leg while maintaining your balance. Hold for a three count, then jump back to the other side. The idea is to explode from your hips for maximum height and distance. Do 10 repetitions per side.
  5. Burpees: Repeat 1 minute, rest 30 seconds.

Training session # 2

  1. ½ mile warm-up run: Complete two laps of the track with 60 percent effort.
  2. Pushups x 20
  3. ¼ mile run: Finish a round with 80 to 90 percent effort.
  4. ¼ mile brisk walk
  5. Pushups x 20
  6. ¼ mile run: Finish a round with 80 to 90 percent effort.
  7. ¼ mile brisk walk
  8. Pushups x 20
  9. ½ mile cooldown: Complete two laps of the track with 60 percent effort.

Training session # 3

  1. ½ mile warm-up run: Complete two laps of the track with 60 percent effort.
  2. 5-10-5 drills: A staple of the NFL Scouting Combine. Place three cones or other objects in a row on the grass, 5 meters apart. (If the soccer field has yard markers, use those instead.) Start at the middle cone or yard marker. Walk 5 meters to the right and touch the ground on the cone. Then run 10 meters to the left and touch the ground. Then sprint back to the starting point. Repeat twice with a 30-second break between sets.
  3. Park bench routine: A park bench – or one that’s likely to be found on the track – is a versatile piece of equipment that you can use to do a combination of dips and pushups. If you struggle with push-ups on the floor, the greater angle between you and the floor will make them easier to do on a bench. Do 12 pushups; Then turn around and do 12 dips. For the dips, look away from the bench and grasp the edge of the bench with your hands. Lower your body to the floor and push up with your triceps. Do 10 pushups and 10 dips, followed by 8, 6, 4, and 2 of each. Note: Whenever possible, use the lower edge of the bench for dips and push-ups. Use the higher edge of the bench for pushups if the lower one is too demanding.
  4. Bleacher run: Walk up and down the grandstand for 5 minutes. No grandstands? Run the track at 60 percent speed for 5 minutes.
  5. Pushups x 20
  6. Squat Jumps x 10
  7. Bleacher run
  8. 5-10-5 drill bits
  9. Park bench routine
  10. ½ mile cooldown: Complete two laps of the track with 60 percent effort.

Training session # 4

Directions: Repeat the following exercises until you have reached a total of 30 minutes for the workout.

  1. ¼ mile run: Finish a lap on the track with 60 percent effort. After the first lap, increase the effort to 80 to 90 percent.
  2. Burpees x 15
  3. Climber x 50
  4. ¼ mile run: Complete a lap on the track with 80 to 90 percent effort.
  5. Pushups x 20

Training session # 5

  1. 1 mile warm-up run: Complete four laps on the track.
  2. Run: Run for 4 minutes with 80 to 90 percent effort.
  3. Quick walk: Walk for 2 minutes.
  4. Run: Let it run for 4 minutes.
  5. Quick walk: Walk for 2 minutes.
  6. Run: Let it run for 4 minutes.
  7. Quick walk: Walk for 2 minutes.
  8. 1 mile cooldown: Finish four laps of the track with 60 percent effort.

Pete Williams is a NASM certified personal trainer and the author or co-author of a number of books on performance and training.

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Men’s Health

Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson Explained Why He Doesn’t Have Six-Pack Abs

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Before we start, let’s agree on something: For someone who is nearly 50 years old, Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson is in incredible shape. As someone with a background in professional American football, wrestling and performing hardcore action scenes – with decades of strength training under the (weight) belt – DJ is a fitness icon for men half his age and has made a name for himself made by Hollywood’s strongest leading actors.

These physical skills are what power tens of thousands of frantic Google searches as those desperately looking for Johnson’s workouts try to find the plan that got him into such gigantic shape. But the internet has defied one mystery: Where are Johnson’s six pack abs? He’s got the core strength and low body fat required to make them pop, after all.

That was the question Johnson asked during a recent WIRED “Autocomplete” interview in which DJ answered some of the internet community’s most burning questions. The question read by his Jungle Cruise co-star, Emily Blunt, was, “What’s wrong with The Rock’s abs?”

“That sucks!” replied Johnson to the question that struck his body. “There’s nothing wrong with them, no. Here’s the thing. I think because on Instagram all these Instagram fitness models have these incredible six, eight, 12, 24 packs.”

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“I have a five and a half pack, sometimes a four and a half pack,” he continued. “But the problem was – which a lot of people don’t know – I ripped the upper part of my thigh off my pelvis in a wrestling match and it popped, in a wrestling match.

“And then it started a chain reaction and tore my abdominal wall, so I had to do emergency surgery with a triple hernia, one tear, one tear, and one tear.” [pointing to each tear].

Sounds like a tough ride – one that will definitely ruin any unwarranted keyboard comment. “Those bastards who google what’s wrong with the abs on The Rock? ‘ Well, it’s called a 45 minute wrestling match and the top of my quad popped out of my pelvis and my adductor popped out of my pelvis, “said Johnson.

“And the pain I’ve been through … I have to fix this shit. I’ll google what got over The Rock?”

Very good reason, you will agree with me.


Ed Cooper is Assistant Digital Editor at Men’s Health UK, writing and editing on anything you want to know – from tech to fitness, mental health to style, food and more.

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Men’s Health

Why Winter is The Best Season for Bulking

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With the lack of beach days forcing you to put up with it all and minimal impromptu parties popping up on the calendar, there’s relatively no need to wear a chiseled six-pack year round. Therefore, winter is the best time of year to build as much lean muscle mass as possible. For those unfamiliar with the concept, it should be made clear that bulking doesn’t translate directly to bodybuilding (aka You Won’t Walk Away Like the Michelin Man).

How do i start?

The most important thing is that to build muscle you need to eat a lot more. The reverse formula for what it takes to lose weight, bulking, requires you to expend more energy than the body needs while at the same time giving some of that energy, e.g. Through regular and strenuous physical activity to build muscle mass.

The amount of food you need to eat varies from person to person and takes into account your current physique and fitness goals, which is why I recommend that you always seek advice from your doctor. For some, it might mean adding an extra can of yogurt to your morning cereal, others need to include a different meal each day, but you want your wellness journey to be tailored just for you.

Wait … am I not getting fat?

While it may be a cause for concern for some, fat gain is part of the mass building process. However, you don’t want to fall into the pattern of simply eating more for profit, it’s all about quality and informed food choices.

Start increasing your calories in small increments, prioritizing more full fat dairy, whole grains, and lean meats to underpin each meal. Other high-calorie foods that should appear on your radar include avocado, sweet potato, and nuts.

Hot Tip: Swapping Vegemite for Peanut Butter on Toast will increase your energy and protein intake without increasing the bread amount, making you less likely to feel too full.

So am I doubling the protein requirement?

Contrary to popular belief, bulking requires more than just protein (so stop knocking down those shakes). The best sources of protein to include in your diet today should be: eggs, nuts and seeds, beans, legumes, lean meats, and seafood. Again, so many factors play a role in how much you need, including your gender, height, and exercise program.

If you are feeling fit and ready to reshape your body but are lacking inspiration in the kitchen department, I recommend investing in one of the many food delivery programs available across Austria that will support your fitness goals. Company like MACROS For example, provide plans called Sculpt, Perform, and Gain, all of which have been pre-portioned and dietitian-approved to suit your lifestyle. The best part? It ships right to your door, which means more time training and less effort preparing meals.

Forget everything you’ve heard about gobbling up whole pizzas, gallons of milk, and tons of cheeseburgers, bulking is far less scary than it sounds and can indeed be a welcome change from your usual fitness regimen.

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