Connect with us

Healthy Eating

14 Healthy Foods High in Estrogen to Enjoy

Published

on

Many people think of estrogen as a “woman’s hormone,” but that’s not entirely true. Estrogen promotes reproductive and sexual health in both sexes.

Individuals assigned female at birth (AFAB) have significantly more estrogen than individuals assigned male at birth (AMAB).

Our body naturally produces estrogen at various levels throughout its life cycle. It’s a delicate balancing act of estrogen and progesterone to keep a person’s monthly cycles of AFAB consistent, according to the Clevland Clinic. For AMAB people, estrogen and testosterone are the two most important hormones that work together in a special balance for reproductive function and health.

Some plants contain phytoestrogen, a substance that is similar in structure and function to estrogen in humans. Many plant-based foods contain phytoestrogens, but some contain higher amounts than others.

Since the structure of phytoestrogens is so similar to the estrogen produced in the human body, these plant substances can bind to estrogen receptors. This could provoke a physical response as if there were actually estrogen in the body that could restore balance when estrogen levels drop, like during menopause.

Phytoestrogen has a much weaker effect on the body than estrogen, so binding to receptors may in some cases produce less than normal estrogenic effects, according to an October 2016 review in the British Journal of Pharmacology.

Some of the potential health benefits of consuming phytoestrogen-rich foods include:

  • Decreasing perimenopause symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats
  • Prevent osteoporosis
  • Improving heart health

Several studies support these health benefits of phytoestrogens, but more evidence is needed, according to the October 2016 review.

There is some controversy as to whether phytoestrogens have positive or negative effects on the human body. High levels of phytoestrogens can act as endocrine disruptors (chemicals that can alter a person’s hormone levels) in some, especially babies and people trying to have children; However, according to a July 2016 study in the Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, they could be therapeutic for people with low levels of estrogen.

The health benefits of many phytoestrogen-containing foods likely outweigh the risk when consumed as part of a varied diet.

How Much Estrogen do you need?

The normal levels of estrogen in the body change as you go through different stages of life and as you differ between the sexes. There is no recommended amount of phytoestrogens to be consumed through food.

Foods high in phytoestrogens

Many plant-based foods contain a certain amount of phytoestrogen. These estrogen-rich fruits, vegetables, beans, and seeds are high on the list.

Soybeans are high in isoflavones and found in a wide variety of plant foods.

Credit: Fudio / iStock / GettyImages

Soy contains a phytoestrogen known as isoflavone. Isoflavones are being studied for the potential to improve bone health and prevent certain types of cancer in postmenopausal people, according to the Cleveland Clinic.

Soybeans are found in many plant-based products such as tofu, tempeh, structured vegetable protein, and as an additive in many packaged foods.

Flax seeds contain a phytoestrogen known as lignans. According to the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University, lignans are metabolized by gut bacteria and converted to enterodiol and enterolactone, which have weak estrogenic activity.

Tempeh is a great plant-based meat alternative made from fermented soybeans, which means it is naturally high in isoflavones. A 3-ounce serving of tempeh contains 17 grams of protein, according to the USDA. It’s also an excellent source of manganese, copper, and vitamin B2.

Apples are one of the most estrogen-rich fruits, although many fruits contain some levels of phytoestrogens, mostly lignans.

Apples are inexpensive, nutritious, and a great source of fiber and vitamin C. Try adding chopped apples to your oatmeal, topping with peanut butter, or adding dried apples to your trail mix.

Fried chickpeas with turmeric in ceramic plate on an old wooden table background.  View from above.

Chickpeas (or chickpeas) are delicious, high-estrogen, plant-based protein.

Credit: kasia2003 / iStock / GettyImages

Chickpeas contain a compound called lectin, a protein that binds to sugar. Lectins are being studied as a potential cancer treatment because of their anti-cancer mechanisms in vitro and in animal studies, according to a May 2020 review in Biomed Research International. Human studies have not confirmed its effectiveness.

Just grab your favorite hummus or try one of these high protein chickpea recipes.

Tofu is made by curdling soy milk and pressing the curd into a small block. This common meat substitute contains isoflavones as well as many other important nutrients. A 3-ounce serving of tofu contains 15 grams of vegetable protein and is an excellent source of calcium.

Not sure how to make tofu or fed up with the same old recipes? Try something new in these anything but boring tofu recipes.

Strawberries are a rich source of phytoestrogens, as well as many other vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

Strawberries contain a phytoestrogen known as resveratrol. Blueberries, cranberries, grapes (and red wine!) Are also good sources of resveratrol, according to the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University.

Hot cup of high estrogen coffee on an old wooden table.

Instant coffee is one of the most estrogen-rich beverages.

Credit: bancha singchai / iStock / GettyImages

Instant coffee powder was the highest among the beverages tested for phytoestrogen content in an analysis published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry in September 2008. Of the other beverages examined, chamomile tea contained the lowest amount of phytoestrogens and alcoholic beverages were classified as moderate in phytoestrogen content.

Garlic is a source of phytoestrogens as well as many other health promoting compounds. Anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and immune-sustaining, the allium could support heart health by helping to regulate blood pressure, according to the Cleveland Clinic.

You can enjoy garlic in different ways, cooked or raw. It’s a great way to take sauteed vegetables to the next level or add them to a homemade salad dressing for a zesty kick.

In addition to protein, fiber, magnesium, and vitamin E, peanuts are also a good source of phytoestrogens.

Different preparations of peanuts result in different phytoestrogen levels. Roasted peanuts contained more isoflavones compared to peanut butter, which contains slightly less isoflavones than fresh peanuts, according to the September 2008 analysis in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Like many other seeds, sunflower seeds contain isoflavones, a type of phytoestrogen. Sunflower seeds contain a variety of compounds and nutrients that have antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, wound healing, and cardiac beneficial effects, according to the September 2017 report in the Chemistry Central Journal.

For an easy nutritional boost, top your salad with a spoonful of sunflower seeds or stir a spoon into a spread.

High-estrogen Brussels sprouts in a wooden bowl.  Harvest.

Brussels sprouts are a phytoestrogen-rich cruciferous vegetable.

Credit: Sanny11 / iStock / GettyImages

Brussels sprouts, along with other cruciferous vegetables, are a rich plant source of phytoestrogens. They’re high in vitamin C, vegetable protein, and potassium. Try them in these creative Brussels sprouts recipes.

Pumpkin seeds are rich in lignan phytoestrogens as well as magnesium, zinc and iron. Just one ounce of pumpkin seeds contains 37 percent DV of magnesium.

According to the National Institutes of Health, 48 percent of Americans eat too little magnesium. Pumpkin seeds are an easy and tasty way to achieve your goals with this essential nutrient.

Zucchini is abundant in the summer months and, in addition to phytoestrogens, contains a variety of important vitamins and minerals. Zucchini is an excellent source of vitamin A, a fat-soluble vitamin that is important for eye health and the immune system.

Try the low-calorie choices in these easy zucchini recipes.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Healthy Eating

Glen Cove market, with help from healthy food initiative, becomes an oasis in food desert

Published

on

A grocery store in Glen Cove has become a healthy haven as a program combats food deserts in underserved communities.

In the La Placita supermarket, shoppers can take away food and drinks as well as healthy recipes in their shopping bags.

The recipes, printed in English and Spanish to reach the store’s Latino community, are part of the Healthy Corner Store initiative organized by Cornell Extension of Suffolk. La Placita is the eighth business to join the program since Cornell Extension of Suffolk, a nonprofit affiliated with Cornell University, started it in 2015.

“We not only teach why you eat it, but also how to prepare it and prepare it in a way that is culturally enjoyable to eat,” said Marta Blanco, senior bilingual nutritionist for the organization, as she walked the store Friday .

The program promotes healthy eating in underserved communities that often live in “food deserts,” said Blanco.

“They might have Wendy’s and Dunkin ‘Donuts, they might have the fast food chains, but they might not always have these healthy options,” said Blanco.

The strategy to promote better nutrition consists of a mix of product placement, education, recipes and information about different fruits and vegetables.

Get the Nassau Newsletter this week!

The biggest news, politics, and crime thriller in Nassau County in your inbox every Friday at 12 noon.

By clicking Sign In, you agree to our privacy policy.

The differences at La Placita supermarket, which has been operating on Glen Street for nine years, can be subtle. To encourage people to drink more water and avoid sugary soft drinks, stacks of bottled water have been moved in advance and with new signage. Bilingual information boards in the fruit and vegetable department inform shoppers about the differences between types of fruit and vegetables.

Store manager Salavador Diaz said the organization approached them earlier this summer to become part of the program.

“They had some suggestions and then I started working with them on the suggestions they had,” said Diaz. “It was a process.”

Diaz said it was too early to say if the program inspires healthier eating, but said that “signage is always good”.

The supermarket offers Spanish-speaking immigrants some groceries that may be harder to come by in larger chains.

“We try to respond to everyone who is in the community,” said Diaz.

Individuals attending an online nutrition workshop as part of the program will receive a $ 10 voucher to use in-store groceries.

Jose Bonilla, a 57-year-old landscaper originally from El Salvador, had picked up a 2-foot-long succulent aloe vera leaf and cactus pieces for a smoothie and watercress for tuna salad as he passed new signs describing different types of broccoli.

Bonilla said he liked the description and went shopping because it was near his house and there was a lot of Latin American food on offer.

Blanco said customers like Bonilla are an example of why this store was chosen for the program.

“This store is able to offer culturally relevant food,” said Blanco.

Ted Phillips covers the Town of Oyster Bay and has been a Newsday reporter since 2011. Throughout his career, he has covered the Albany state government, local finance, local government, crime, economic development and armed conflict.

Continue Reading

Healthy Eating

Tate’s Bake Shop Now Offers Vegan Cookies: Where to Find Them

Published

on

With World Cookie Day this weekend, it’s time to pamper yourself, and New York’s signature cookie company goes vegan just in time. Southhampton-based Tate’s Bake Shop has just launched its first range of vegan biscuits and has relocated its signature products to meet growing plant-based demand. The company’s new vegan cookies have the flavors Chocolate Chip and Vanilla Maple and offer well-known favorites without animal products. The cookies, certified as vegan by Vegan.org, use egg substitutes and vegan butter to mimic the classic recipes.

Tate launched the two new cookies on December 1st in preparation for World Cookie Day on December 4th. Both flavors are available through Tate’s website, Amazon, and select grocery stores in the Northeast. The company also announced that the vegan biscuits will be available in Whole Foods Markets later this month after debuting for the first time.

“As a brand committed to delighting consumers with delicious new treats, we’re excited to introduce a vegan variety of our cookies,” said Lauren Sella, chief marketing officer of Tate’s Bake Shop. “Tate’s continues to strive to provide uncompromising handcrafted quality in all of its products, while also meeting the evolving tastes of our customers.”

Tate was founded in 2000 and is now known far beyond Long Island. The confectionery company was acquired by Mondelez International for $ 500 million in 2018. Since then, the company’s expansion has accelerated, moving into the plant-based sector and improving product distribution. The company also recently developed a gluten-free biscuit and received kosher certification from the Orthodox Union.

“Having launched our gluten-free cookies more than a decade ago, we look forward to introducing our vegan cookies and growing with our customers’ changing lifestyles,” said Sella. “We hope that Tate’s premium vegan cookies will appeal to many who incorporate plant-based foods into their choices.”

Tate’s new range of biscuits catapults the New York bakery into a rapidly growing market. The vegan confectionery market has grown strongly in recent years and reflects the stronger trend towards plant-based nutrition. A report by Grand View Research found that the global vegan confectionery market was valued at $ 816 million in 2019. The report found that the market is expected to grow 11.8 percent CAGR from 2020 to 2027.

Companies like Mondelez are taking the vegan confectionery market to a new level. Several other cookie companies, including Insomnia Cookies, Chip NYC, and more, have helped bring plant-based cookies into the spotlight. Maya’s Cookies by Maya Madsen from San Diego also saw sales increase by 10,000 percent last summer.

Mondelez also develops the plant-based chocolate ball. Another subsidiary, Cadbury, recently launched its first plant-based chocolate bar. The Cadbury Plant Bar offered two flavors: Salted Caramel and Smooth Chocolate. The parent company’s increased efforts across the confectionery industry indicate broader efforts to meet plant-based needs around the world.

“The increasing public appetite for a variety of snack options and plant-based alternatives has never been more evident,” said Louise Stigant, UK Managing Director at Mondelez. “At Mondelēz, changing consumer demands have long shaped our ambition to offer a wide range of products that are suitable for everyone, and the new Cadbury Plant Bar range is the latest stop on the way.”

31 delicious, herbal recipes for repeating

Do you want fresh ideas for healthy, plant-based, and delicious meals? This free newsletter is for you. Sign up to receive a recipe of the day in your inbox every morning.

Continue Reading

Healthy Eating

Greater Flint Health Coalition + SNAP-Ed = a healthier community

Published

on

This article is part of Stories of Change, a series of inspiring articles by people providing evidence-based programs and strategies that empower communities to eat healthily and get more exercise. It is made possible with funds from the Michigan Fitness Foundation.

The Greater Flint Health Coalition (GFHC) is focused on improving the health of Genesee County’s residents. To that end, they offer a variety of programs to motivate residents in fun and easy ways, promote healthy behavior, and connect people of all ages with resources that will help them live healthier lives. So it only made sense for the coalition to add two new programs to help residents eat healthily and get more exercise.

“In a community health survey, our residents reported a lack of access to healthy food,” said Nichole Smith-Anderson, GFHC director of special projects. “There aren’t a lot of grocery stores here and not much knowledge about healthy eating either. If people don’t know how to cook or have never eaten a vegetable, the chances of buying it are slim, especially if they are on a budget. “

The first program added as part of GFHC’s “Commit to Fit” program is The Learning Kitchen, a program designed for adults to learn how to incorporate healthier foods into their diet through cooking and nutrition education. Topics range from balancing and planning meals, expanding groceries to maximize nutrition, and shopping strategies to cooking techniques. The Learning Kitchen classes are taught by local chefs and / or trained nutritionists.

The second program is Fresh Conversations. It offers interactive sessions for seniors. The program promotes healthy aging in accordance with the American Dietary Guidelines, which encourage people to eat a variety of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean protein and healthy fats, and reduce their consumption of sodium and added sugar.

Residents of the Burton Senior Center in Burton celebrate the completion of their Fresh Conversations program with nutritionist Amanda Mattila.
Both programs are made possible by funding from the Michigan Fitness Foundation (MFF )’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed). MFF is a state executive agency of the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services for the educational component of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. SNAP-Ed is a U.S. Department of Agriculture educational program that teaches those eligible for SNAP how to live healthier lives. MFF offers grants for conducting SNAP-Ed programs throughout the state of Michigan.

“The SNAP-Ed courses empower people. It gives them practical ideas on how to incorporate more fruits and vegetables into their daily lives, ”says Smith-Anderson. “It doesn’t have to be this massive change in diet, but simply how to eat healthier.”

Learning Kitchen participant Toni Isaac says she has already learned a lot from teacher Alaina Larrea.

“She gave us good information on how to cook with more vegetables, whether fresh, frozen, or canned. She also taught us how to look for those nutritional information on the food label,” says Isaac. “When you pick up a can of something, you don’t really pay attention to what’s in it – added sugar, sodium, how much fiber. It was a really good session on these various things that we take for granted.” . “

Because The Learning Kitchen is offered virtually, Larrea increases engagement by involving participants in hands-on activities during each lesson. She lets students know which fruits and vegetables will be featured in class so they can purchase them in advance and join in during the cooking demonstrations.

A lesson on zucchini shows different uses, perhaps as a stand-alone side dish, in a homemade quick bread or as an alternative to pasta in dishes like spaghetti.

“The SNAP-Ed programs give people an idea of ​​how to prepare fruits and vegetables and not be intimidated,” says Smith-Anderson. “There’s a lot to suggest that people can watch cooking demos and do them themselves and build their confidence. They realize, ‘I can do this. It’s not too difficult.’ All of the recipes are really geared towards being very easy and affordable. There aren’t too many ingredients, and that’s really important to make sure people are successful. “

When comparing fresh fruits and vegetables to frozen or canned products, Larrea encourages her students to find food in their own kitchen instead of showing the food on the screen and giving lectures on its nutritional value. Not only does this make the class more interesting, it also shows participants what is in the foods they are used to eating. It also helps dispel myths about food. You will also learn that fresh, frozen, or canned fruits and vegetables all have similar nutritional levels and that having frozen or canned fruits and vegetables on hand and increasing the variety of fruits and vegetables you consume can be useful. Canned frozen fruits and vegetables can also be an economical choice for those who find fresh produce spoil before they can eat anything. Isaac is used to considering the health and economic benefits of the foods she buys every time she makes a purchase.

“The study kitchen definitely helped me. I know more now, ”she says. “I think if more people started using the Commit to Fit programs, we would find a better health situation in the Flint community.”

While the move to virtual platforms has been challenging for many organizations offering programs, this was GFHC’s first experience of offering SNAP-Ed courses, so it seemed natural to conduct them online.

“The virtual option definitely has an advantage. It makes it easier for people to participate and allows us to engage more individuals, ”says Smith-Anderson. “Some people feel uncomfortable in a classroom environment, be it because of COVID, transportation, or any other reason. I have found that many people enjoy participating in the comfort of their own homes. Our virtual programming makes this possible, especially for those who are unwilling or unable to participate in this social component. “

To prepare participants for the adult virtual courses, Larrea emails them pre-study materials so they know what to expect. She also sends them recipes that are tailored to each lesson and nutritional reinforcement items – such as practical kitchen gadgets that make cooking easier.

“I take a visual and practical approach,” says Larrea. “I like to see the effects when participants make the connection in their real life. Now they can use it to improve their health.”

While The Learning Kitchen remains virtual, Fresh Conversations will now be offered both on-site at senior citizen centers across the county and virtually for those who prefer to attend from home. Larrea says virtual classes will continue to be important to improve access to the programs.

SNAP-Ed Nutrition Educator Alaina Larrea teaches seniors about cardiovascular health through synchronous virtual learning at the Brennan Senior Center in Flint as part of the Fresh Conversations program.
“The virtual class really reduced the transport barrier for participants,” she says. “And while face-to-face classes are great, our adults often need to find transportation or babysitters. Virtual delivery really helped break down barriers. “

Larrea and Smith-Anderson agree that SNAP-Ed programming is helping catalyze healthy change in Flint and across Genesee County.

“Offering SNAP-Ed programs is one of the many steps we are taking to keep our community as healthy as possible,” says Smith-Anderson. “SNAP-Ed helps our community to build awareness and knowledge about healthy living. People are overwhelmed and think they have to run marathons to get well and they don’t. We are beginning to see that people have small but significant behaviors, and that goes a long way in improving their health. ”

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending