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How can supplements improve men’s health? –

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Dietary supplements are extremely important in today’s rapidly changing environment: we are constantly overextending, falling asleep, overtraining, and recovering at the height of impoverished stress, poor eating habits and, in some cases, inactivity. In addition, dietary supplements have a significant impact on health, as vitamin and mineral deficiencies often lead to health problems. These can include prostate problems, insufficient testosterone, or androgenic alopecia, a male counterpart of menopause. However, all of these problems are avoided in the best of health. More information is available at www.menhancesupplement.com.

Below are the top nutritional supplements and their roles in improving men’s health:

Taking dietary supplements to correct a zinc deficiency:

Zinc is essential for healthy hormonal health, and studies show that men with insufficient zinc are more likely to ejaculate prematurely. In contrast, zinc is an essential mineral that supports nutritional metabolism, immunological function, DNA and protein formation. One of the other properties of zinc is to regulate the harmony of estrogen and progesterone in the body: zinc hampers the conversion of testosterone to estrogen so that men who appear to be zinc deficient can find it easier to find muscles in the chest, hips and build belly. Zinc is very important because zinc can inhibit the production of a hormone called estrogen.

Dietary supplements can improve levels of magnesium in men’s bodies:

Magnesium, sometimes considered a magical mineral, is essential for a wide variety of physical activities. It is necessary for blood sugar regulation, protein synthesis, neuron function, healing and hormonal balance. Magnesium deficiency often manifests itself in difficulty falling asleep, fatigue, decreased libido and constant excitement or exhaustion. Magnesium is especially beneficial for men as it increases testosterone levels and promotes fertility. Choose a magnesium supplement, including magnesium malate, glycine, and citrate. Ingesting up to two grams of magnesium each evening will increase your immunity, hormone levels, and the quality of your sleep, prevent muscle spasms, and improve your experience.

Dietary supplements help improve vitamin D production:

Vitamin D is one of the most important vitamins the body needs: it strengthens the immune system, fights infections and increases sperm count. In addition, vitamin D is necessary for bone building and cardiovascular health. Low levels of vitamin D have been linked to poor male sexual performance in studies as they are essential for hormonal health. Vitamin D is also critical to skeletal muscle growth and the regulation of our emotions. A daily dose of 5000 IU of vitamin D is beneficial for a man’s endocrine and immune response health.

Improving vitamin B complexes by taking dietary supplements:

Because B vitamins are water soluble, your system cannot store them. Hence, you need to consume them regularly. Vitamin B deficiency can cause rashes, digestive problems, anemia, melancholy, and anxiety. Most importantly for men, vitamin B is for cholesterol levels, and coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death in men worldwide. Niacin (B3) increases your good HDL cholesterol while also lowering your harmful LDL cholesterol. It is also necessary for DNA production and repair, as well as brain function. Pantothenic acid (B5), another crucial one, is responsible for the formation of red blood cells and the production of essential sex and stress hormones.

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Men’s Health

5 Track Workouts That Will Get You Out of the Gym

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Sprinters have the best physique in the world: Their bodies are made up of long, sinewy muscles that they can propel over the course at breathtaking speed. Why do so few people do track workouts? The facilities are easily accessible (many high and middle schools keep their lanes open to the public in the evenings and on weekends), and they’re not just for running, either. Most lanes have grassy infields, if not lined soccer fields, that can be used for shuttle runs and exercises that could otherwise be done in the gym.

Training on the track in the spring and autumn months or on summer evenings is often more comfortable than another overcrowded gym workout. And unlike your typical long, stationary jog on a treadmill, running on a distance is much more likely to improve strength and speed. Last but not least, it offers a welcome change from the gym and the opportunity to train outside.

Ready to start? Here’s a warm-up and five workouts you can do on the track and in the infield:

5 track workouts that will get you out of the gym

Warm up

  1. Cobra: Lie on your stomach (face down) on the infield grass. Squeeze your buttocks together and bring your shoulder blades back and down. With your thumbs up, arms turned out, and chin tucked in, lift and hold your chest for 2 seconds. Slowly lower to the floor and repeat 10 repetitions.
  2. Pelvic slope: This opens the hips and pelvis, which can become blocked from sitting too much. From a standing position with your hands on your hips and knees slightly bent, move your hips back and forth and tilt your pelvis. You should feel a stretch in your lower back. Be sure to move from your hips; don’t get out of step. This can also be done with your hands on the cross for more stretch. Tilt back and forth 10 times.
  3. Knee hug: Raise your right knee to your chest and reach under that knee with your hands. Pull the knee as close to your chest as possible while contracting your left gluteus muscle. Repeat on the other side. Do 10 on each side.
  4. Side lunge: Step right while keeping your toes straight and feet flat. Squat down by sitting back and on your right leg; Keep your left leg straight and your weight on your right metatarsus to your heel. Keeping your left leg straight, crouch down as low as you can and hold this position for 2 seconds. You can return to the starting position or slip to the next lunge by gradually moving to the right. Do 10 on each side.
  5. Ass kicks: From an athletic posture, crouch slightly as if you were sitting in a chair. Jump and bring your heels to the glutes. Do not arch your lower back. Land gently in an athletic position and repeat 10 reps.

Training session # 1

Directions: Repeat the following exercises four times for a total of 5 sets or 30 minutes.

  1. Warm-up run: Two laps around the track with 60 percent effort.
  2. Plank: Hold for 1 minute, rest for 30 seconds.
  3. Dips: Repeat for 1 minute, rest for 30 seconds (use a bench or bleachers).
  4. Lateral limits: Stand on your right leg with your left foot off the floor in balance. Squat slightly with your right leg, jump sideways to the left. Extend your ankles, knees, and hips and land on your left leg while maintaining your balance. Hold for a three count, then jump back to the other side. The idea is to explode from your hips for maximum height and distance. Do 10 repetitions per side.
  5. Burpees: Repeat 1 minute, rest 30 seconds.

Training session # 2

  1. ½ mile warm-up run: Complete two laps of the track with 60 percent effort.
  2. Pushups x 20
  3. ¼ mile run: Finish a round with 80 to 90 percent effort.
  4. ¼ mile brisk walk
  5. Pushups x 20
  6. ¼ mile run: Finish a round with 80 to 90 percent effort.
  7. ¼ mile brisk walk
  8. Pushups x 20
  9. ½ mile cooldown: Complete two laps of the track with 60 percent effort.

Training session # 3

  1. ½ mile warm-up run: Complete two laps of the track with 60 percent effort.
  2. 5-10-5 drills: A staple of the NFL Scouting Combine. Place three cones or other objects in a row on the grass, 5 meters apart. (If the soccer field has yard markers, use those instead.) Start at the middle cone or yard marker. Walk 5 meters to the right and touch the ground on the cone. Then run 10 meters to the left and touch the ground. Then sprint back to the starting point. Repeat twice with a 30-second break between sets.
  3. Park bench routine: A park bench – or one that’s likely to be found on the track – is a versatile piece of equipment that you can use to do a combination of dips and pushups. If you struggle with push-ups on the floor, the greater angle between you and the floor will make them easier to do on a bench. Do 12 pushups; Then turn around and do 12 dips. For the dips, look away from the bench and grasp the edge of the bench with your hands. Lower your body to the floor and push up with your triceps. Do 10 pushups and 10 dips, followed by 8, 6, 4, and 2 of each. Note: Whenever possible, use the lower edge of the bench for dips and push-ups. Use the higher edge of the bench for pushups if the lower one is too demanding.
  4. Bleacher run: Walk up and down the grandstand for 5 minutes. No grandstands? Run the track at 60 percent speed for 5 minutes.
  5. Pushups x 20
  6. Squat Jumps x 10
  7. Bleacher run
  8. 5-10-5 drill bits
  9. Park bench routine
  10. ½ mile cooldown: Complete two laps of the track with 60 percent effort.

Training session # 4

Directions: Repeat the following exercises until you have reached a total of 30 minutes for the workout.

  1. ¼ mile run: Finish a lap on the track with 60 percent effort. After the first lap, increase the effort to 80 to 90 percent.
  2. Burpees x 15
  3. Climber x 50
  4. ¼ mile run: Complete a lap on the track with 80 to 90 percent effort.
  5. Pushups x 20

Training session # 5

  1. 1 mile warm-up run: Complete four laps on the track.
  2. Run: Run for 4 minutes with 80 to 90 percent effort.
  3. Quick walk: Walk for 2 minutes.
  4. Run: Let it run for 4 minutes.
  5. Quick walk: Walk for 2 minutes.
  6. Run: Let it run for 4 minutes.
  7. Quick walk: Walk for 2 minutes.
  8. 1 mile cooldown: Finish four laps of the track with 60 percent effort.

Pete Williams is a NASM certified personal trainer and the author or co-author of a number of books on performance and training.

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Men’s Health

Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson Explained Why He Doesn’t Have Six-Pack Abs

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Before we start, let’s agree on something: For someone who is nearly 50 years old, Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson is in incredible shape. As someone with a background in professional American football, wrestling and performing hardcore action scenes – with decades of strength training under the (weight) belt – DJ is a fitness icon for men half his age and has made a name for himself made by Hollywood’s strongest leading actors.

These physical skills are what power tens of thousands of frantic Google searches as those desperately looking for Johnson’s workouts try to find the plan that got him into such gigantic shape. But the internet has defied one mystery: Where are Johnson’s six pack abs? He’s got the core strength and low body fat required to make them pop, after all.

That was the question Johnson asked during a recent WIRED “Autocomplete” interview in which DJ answered some of the internet community’s most burning questions. The question read by his Jungle Cruise co-star, Emily Blunt, was, “What’s wrong with The Rock’s abs?”

“That sucks!” replied Johnson to the question that struck his body. “There’s nothing wrong with them, no. Here’s the thing. I think because on Instagram all these Instagram fitness models have these incredible six, eight, 12, 24 packs.”

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“I have a five and a half pack, sometimes a four and a half pack,” he continued. “But the problem was – which a lot of people don’t know – I ripped the upper part of my thigh off my pelvis in a wrestling match and it popped, in a wrestling match.

“And then it started a chain reaction and tore my abdominal wall, so I had to do emergency surgery with a triple hernia, one tear, one tear, and one tear.” [pointing to each tear].

Sounds like a tough ride – one that will definitely ruin any unwarranted keyboard comment. “Those bastards who google what’s wrong with the abs on The Rock? ‘ Well, it’s called a 45 minute wrestling match and the top of my quad popped out of my pelvis and my adductor popped out of my pelvis, “said Johnson.

“And the pain I’ve been through … I have to fix this shit. I’ll google what got over The Rock?”

Very good reason, you will agree with me.


Ed Cooper is Assistant Digital Editor at Men’s Health UK, writing and editing on anything you want to know – from tech to fitness, mental health to style, food and more.

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Men’s Health

Why Winter is The Best Season for Bulking

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With the lack of beach days forcing you to put up with it all and minimal impromptu parties popping up on the calendar, there’s relatively no need to wear a chiseled six-pack year round. Therefore, winter is the best time of year to build as much lean muscle mass as possible. For those unfamiliar with the concept, it should be made clear that bulking doesn’t translate directly to bodybuilding (aka You Won’t Walk Away Like the Michelin Man).

How do i start?

The most important thing is that to build muscle you need to eat a lot more. The reverse formula for what it takes to lose weight, bulking, requires you to expend more energy than the body needs while at the same time giving some of that energy, e.g. Through regular and strenuous physical activity to build muscle mass.

The amount of food you need to eat varies from person to person and takes into account your current physique and fitness goals, which is why I recommend that you always seek advice from your doctor. For some, it might mean adding an extra can of yogurt to your morning cereal, others need to include a different meal each day, but you want your wellness journey to be tailored just for you.

Wait … am I not getting fat?

While it may be a cause for concern for some, fat gain is part of the mass building process. However, you don’t want to fall into the pattern of simply eating more for profit, it’s all about quality and informed food choices.

Start increasing your calories in small increments, prioritizing more full fat dairy, whole grains, and lean meats to underpin each meal. Other high-calorie foods that should appear on your radar include avocado, sweet potato, and nuts.

Hot Tip: Swapping Vegemite for Peanut Butter on Toast will increase your energy and protein intake without increasing the bread amount, making you less likely to feel too full.

So am I doubling the protein requirement?

Contrary to popular belief, bulking requires more than just protein (so stop knocking down those shakes). The best sources of protein to include in your diet today should be: eggs, nuts and seeds, beans, legumes, lean meats, and seafood. Again, so many factors play a role in how much you need, including your gender, height, and exercise program.

If you are feeling fit and ready to reshape your body but are lacking inspiration in the kitchen department, I recommend investing in one of the many food delivery programs available across Austria that will support your fitness goals. Company like MACROS For example, provide plans called Sculpt, Perform, and Gain, all of which have been pre-portioned and dietitian-approved to suit your lifestyle. The best part? It ships right to your door, which means more time training and less effort preparing meals.

Forget everything you’ve heard about gobbling up whole pizzas, gallons of milk, and tons of cheeseburgers, bulking is far less scary than it sounds and can indeed be a welcome change from your usual fitness regimen.

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