Connect with us

Women’s Health

Female-Focused Smartwatches That Look Smart Too

Published

on

From the discreetly elegant Apple Hermès with a rectangular case to the glittering Michael Kors round dial to the sporty Tag Heuer by tennis star Naomi Osaka, you might think that women have a large selection when it comes to digital watches. But Garmin, the tech giant, saw a loophole.

In January, Garmin introduced Lily, a smart-looking smartwatch. It combines what Garmin is known for – performance monitoring devices – with something the company had never tried before: a traditional, minimalist jewelry watch.

On a video call, Kirsten Erikson, Product Marketing Manager at Garmin said, “We found a niche in the market, especially for women, and realized that some hadn’t been able to choose a smartwatch because they felt it was too big and too sporty . ”Or too technical looking.” Together with a women’s team, Ms. Erikson orchestrated the production of a “fashionable-looking watch for small wrists” – a new smartwatch “for women by women,” as the company is promoting it.

After the team had put together hundreds of pictures of classic jewelry watches, the team started with a round case with a diameter of 34 millimeters – significantly smaller than current Smart models with dials over 40 millimeters in diameter. That choice posed a challenge: making small-scale tracking capabilities available and fitting into a battery that lasts five days has exceeded technical limits.

In contrast to digital dials, which turn black when not in use, Lily shows a selection of patterns that reflect the monograms of fashion houses and the guilloche dials of analog timepieces.

One touch of the screen activates a pedometer and calorie tracker, as well as tracking applications for exercises such as yoga, pilates and mindful breathing. What makes Lily stand out, however, are unexpected, women-centric features like menstrual cycle monitoring and pregnancy.

Some may raise their eyebrows at a watch that goes against the current trend towards gender neutral design, but the commercial numbers show that Garmin got that niche right. Although the company does not publish sales figures, it said well over 50 percent of Lily customers are new to Garmin. Lily’s marketing strategy to promote Lily has also helped grow the company’s overall female customer base: women buy more than half of the generic wellness watches Garmin sells.

Sarah Willersdorf, Global Head of Luxury at the Boston Consulting Group, is not surprised. In an email, she wrote that she believed the pandemic had placed an emphasis on health and wellness. Women’s health is a large and growing market, according to the Boston Group, expected to reach over $ 45 billion worldwide by 2026 – three times the size it is today.

“This growth is being driven by many factors, including a much more open discussion about women’s health – like fertility, menstruation, and menopause – and creativity in this area with a number of companies dealing with everything from tracking apps to nutritional supplements and wearables like the Garmin watch, are innovative. “Wrote Mrs. Willersdorf.

Attracting women has recently been the focus of several established analog luxury houses, including Zenith and Breitling. Garmin’s move signals that the booming wearable device market, valued at around $ 73 billion by 2022, may find additional leverage among women.

The $ 199 (Garmins can cost over $ 400) Lily comes with silicone straps in muted neutrals and pastel colors for a sportier look. More traditional leather straps (at no extra charge) are available in gray, black, and white.

On the Garmin Instagram account, a woman with the username @ mum_on_the_run_3 commented: “It’s perfect if you don’t want to give up your tracker but are looking for something more elegant for an evening or a special occasion.”

She might agree with Ms. Erikson’s opinion: “With Lily, we created the watch that women didn’t know they needed.”

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Women’s Health

Editorial: Roe v. Wade could soon be history. What will you do in this moment? – Decaturish

Published

on

By State Sen. Elena Parent

A political earthquake struck the United States on Monday, May 2, 2022. Politico published a leaked draft Supreme Court opinion in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization that showed 5 conservative Supreme Court justices had voted to explicitly overturn Roe v. Calf.

For half a century, since Roe in 1973 (reaffirmed in 1992’s Planned Parenthood v. Casey), women across the country have had a constitutional right to end a pregnancy pre-viability. That will end if this draft opinion becomes official, devastating women’s reproductive rights in many states across the country, including Georgia. While not completely unexpected, the draft opinion is extreme in both its rhetoric and judicial philosophy. The impact will be seismic, and more than half of US women could lose their right to abortion or see it severely restricted.

The opinion, written by Justice Samuel Alito, rests on an originalist judicial philosophy: rights that are not explicitly mentioned in the Constitution nor deeply rooted in the country’s history and tradition are not worthy of constitutional protection. Taken at face value, this can logically be extrapolated to mean that no right based on the right to privacy given over the past 60-plus years is a right after all, and all should be returned to legislatures to decide. gay marriage? Interracial marriage? Right to use contraception? All in question.

For women’s health specifically, the decision could have ramifications for access to birth control, the morning-after pill, and medication abortions. The Georgia Senate passed a bill with restrictions on medication abortions this past session, which did not pass the House. I expect that this bill, and others more restrictive, will see a renewed push when we reconvene. Some states, like Louisiana and Tennessee, have already begun to criminalize abortion, which could put women who have had miscarriages, already facing stress and heartbreak, in jeopardy of being falsely charged. Women’s rights to control their bodies, their families, their careers, and their lives are at risk. This means that women’s equality is at risk. According to the Brennan Center, one of the leading indicators of the health of a democracy is the status of rights for women. I do not overstate the risk of this decision could have on not just women, but our entire democracy.

If this opinion is adopted, the impact on Georgia would be profound. Even though a majority of Georgians support the right to choose, the Republican-controlled General Assembly passed HB 481, also known as the ‘heartbeat bill’, in 2019. This banned all abortions after fetal cardiac activity is first detected, at approximately six weeks of pregnancy—prior to when many women know they are pregnant. This law was blocked by the courts, but a Supreme Court decision undermining federal protection for abortion would pave the way for its implementation. Republican candidates in Georgia have already promised to pass an outright ban on abortion, without exceptions. A majority male Legislature, Governor, and Supreme Court making these hypocritical decisions for women is infuriating.

Ironically, Georgia otherwise does a poor job elevating women and children. Georgia is number 1 in maternal mortality and ranked 38th on an index of child well-being by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, which looks at 16 categories from poverty to access to education. Implementation of HB 481 means that women will have to remain pregnant, but upon birth, the state will not be as concerned about the outcomes of this woman or her child.

But HB 481 is even more radical than that. It grants personhood to an unborn fetus, giving it rights equal to the woman carrying it. The “logic” here is to set the foundation for a complete and total ban on abortion. This opens a legal and ethical minefield that was not vetted during the consideration of the legislation and could lead to all kinds of restrictions on the lives and freedoms of pregnant women. The law requires that the father provide support for prenatal care, but there is no safe way to test for paternity that early in a pregnancy. What if women engage in risky behaviors? What actions could be taken and by whom? Could women be surveyed for their pregnancy? How will this effect fertility treatments like IVF? Will this limit a couple’s ability to fertilize more eggs than they wish to carry? Much of this will be decided when the lawsuits begin. The father of the fetus, and friends and family members of the pregnant woman, will also be under a microscope should something go wrong with a pregnancy.

If this decision is confirmed, what can we do? First and foremost, we must exercise our power and vote. 68% of Georgians oppose overturning Roe v. Wade according to a recent AJC poll. This upcoming midterm will be critical for women and all Georgians. We must elect pro-choice candidates like Senator Raphael Warnock. Stacey Abrams as Governor and Jen Jordan as Attorney General will have a significant influence on how these laws are implemented. We have the chance to flip legislative seats all over the state. We can advocate for pro-choice policies. This may be as simple as writing an email to State and Federal lawmakers, or as complex as organizing to wield the immense political and economic power held by pro-choice Americans. We can donate to organizations that are advocating and litigating these issues like Planned Parenthood or to organizations supporting access for poor women and women of color, who will be disproportionately impacted by this decision.

When the public so disproportionately favors abortion rights, the cause is not hopeless. Yes, abortion opponents have stacked the courts and gerrymandered the districts. But if the people rise up, these rights can be restored. What do you want to do at this moment?

State Senator Elena Parent was elected to the State Senate in 2014. She represents District 42, which includes portions of central and north DeKalb County

If you appreciate our work, please become a paying supporter. For as little as $6 a month, you can help us keep you in the loop about your community. To become a supporter, click here.

Want Decaturish delivered to your inbox every day? Sign up for our free newsletter by clicking here.

Continue Reading

Women’s Health

Report calls out gaps in women’s heart disease research, care |

Published

on

American Heart Association News

Women continue to be underrepresented in research for heart disease, and extensive changes are needed in how women’s heart health is studied, taught and treated, a new report says.

The report, published Monday as a presidential advisory from the American Heart Association in its journal Circulation, seeks to address problems that range from the way basic science is conducted to how women receive care.

“We are losing ground on key indicators of cardiovascular health among women, including blood pressure control, weight management and diabetes,” advisory co-author Dr. Véronique L. Roger said in a news release. Roger is a senior investigator at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, a division of the National Institutes of Health.

Some heart disease risk factors are specific to women, the advisory said. For example, risks are higher for women who start their menstrual cycle younger than 11 or enter menopause younger than age 40.

Women also face risks related to high blood pressure or diabetes during pregnancy, as well as from oral contraceptive use and hormone replacement therapy. Depression and anxiety are associated with heart disease more frequently and at younger ages in women than in men.

Women also are disproportionately affected by inflammatory and autoimmune disorders such as lupus, rheumatoid arthritis and scleroderma, which are associated with increased risk of heart inflammation, heart and valve disease and heart attacks. And women face heart risks related to treatment for breast, uterine or ovarian cancer.

Despite all that, women continue to be underrepresented in research, leading to gaps in knowledge and understanding of how heart disease affects women.

“Comparing data from women with data from men inherently positions data from men as the gold standard,” said Roger. “For example, the belief that women having a heart attack will present more often with atypical symptoms carries an undertone that women present in the ‘wrong way.'”

Using data specific to women could improve diagnosis and treatment for heart disease, the advisory said. But nearly 7 out of 10 post-graduate medical trainees reported little to no training regarding gender-based medical concepts. Only 22% of physicians and 42% of cardiologists said they felt prepared to adequately assess heart disease specific to women.

“We must urgently address the pervasive gaps in knowledge and health care delivery to reduce gender-based disparities and achieve equity,” said report co-author Dr. Nanette K. Wenger, emeritus professor of medicine in the division of cardiology at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta.

The advisory said that declining heart health among US women who are considering pregnancy, and less-than-optimal levels of heart health among pregnant women, was particularly worrisome. Heart problems may lead to pregnancy challenges for the mother and health risks or complications for her and her children.

Solving that will take cooperation from experts in several fields, Wenger said. “We recommend cardiologists, primary care physicians and obstetricians and gynecologists work together to quantify and reduce the risks of cardiovascular disease throughout a woman’s life.”

According to AHA statistics, heart disease is the leading cause of death for US men and women, and 44% of women age 20 years and older between 2015 and 2018 had some form of cardiovascular disease, including high blood pressure.

But awareness among women, which rose before 2009, is slipping. In 2019, only 44% of women understood that heart disease was women’s leading cause of death.

The advisory recommended several actions, such as:

‒ launching new, culturally sensitive heart health awareness campaigns that emphasize the benefits of prevention and education.

‒ conducting more research studies focused on women, especially women from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds, and at younger ages.

‒ collecting and analyzing data to help deliver more effective health care.

Affordable health insurance coverage and out-of-pocket costs are the two most important factors affecting whether people get health care, the advisory said, noting that under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, signed into law in 2010, women between the ages of 19 and 64 saw the largest coverage gain of any demographic group.

In recent years, Medicaid coverage expansion through the ACA has been shown to increase coverage and health care among low-income women of reproductive age.

“We need to help women develop a ‘lifetime approach’ to their health, where they are empowered to proactively manage their heart disease risk in every life stage,” said Wenger.

If you have questions or comments about this American Heart Association News story, please email editor@heart.org.

Copyright is owned or held by the American Heart Association, Inc., and all rights are reserved. Permission is granted, at no cost and without need for further request, for individuals, media outlets, and non-commercial education and awareness efforts to link to, quote, excerpt or reprint from these stories in any medium as long as no text is altered and proper attribution is made to American Heart Association News.

Other uses, including educational products or services sold for profit, must comply with the American Heart Association’s Copyright Permission Guidelines. See full terms of use. These stories may not be used to promote or endorse a commercial product or service.

HEALTH CARE DISCLAIMER: This site and its services do not constitute the practice of medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always talk to your health care provider for diagnosis and treatment, including your specific medical needs. If you have or suspect that you have a medical problem or condition, please contact a qualified health care professional immediately. If you are in the United States and experiencing a medical emergency, call 911 or call for emergency medical help immediately.

Continue Reading

Women’s Health

Photos: Aspen Democrats rally in support of women’s rights

Published

on

A woman wearing a “my body, my choice” sign listens to the speakers during a pro-women’s rights rally put on by the Pitkin County Democrats on Saturday, May 14, 2022, at Paepcke Park in Aspen.
Austin Colbert/The Aspen Times

The Pitkin County Democratic Party hosted a rally on Saturday afternoon at Aspen’s Paepcke Park in support of women’s reproductive rights. The event was in response to the leak of Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito’s draft decision on Roe v. Wade, which could potentially take away a woman’s right to an abortion at the federal level.

The organization said the event was “in support of a woman’s constitutional right to make her own reproductive health decision without a Republican in her uterus.”

The speakers included the Pitkin County Democrats’ own Howard and Betty Wallach, as well as current Aspen City Councilwoman Rachel Richards. Numerous women also took to the stage to share their stories and feelings when the microphone was opened up to the audience.

Next on the schedule for the Pitkin County Democrats is a town hall session at the Aspen Public Library on Monday from 5 to 6 pm with Colorado State House of Representatives District 57 Democratic candidates Elizabeth Velasco and Cole Buerger. The two candidates are seeking to run against District 57 incumbent Perry Will, a Republican from New Castle.

The entire Roaring Fork Valley, including Aspen and Basalt, will be part of District 57 next year as part of recent redistricting.

Monday’s event is not a debate, and will largely be Howard Wallach asking questions to the two candidates.

Howard Wallach of the Pitkin County Democrats talks during a rally on Saturday, May 14, 2022, at Paepcke Park in Aspen.
Austin Colbert/The Aspen Times

Josie Brands, who was among a group of middle school students raising money for the Jackson Women’s Health Organization, at an abortion clinic in Mississippi, accepts a donation during a pro-women’s rights rally on Saturday, May 14, 2022, at Paepcke Park in Aspen .
Austin Colbert/The Aspen Times

People gather to take a photo with their signs after a pro-women’s rights rally put on by the Pitkin County Democrats on Saturday, May 14, 2022, at Paepcke Park in Aspen.
Austin Colbert/The Aspen Times

Aspen city councilwoman Rachel Richards talks during a pro-women’s rights rally on Saturday, May 14, 2022, at Paepcke Park in Aspen.
Austin Colbert/The Aspen Times

People gather to listen to the speakers during a pro-women’s rights rally put on by the Pitkin County Democrats on Saturday, May 14, 2022, at Paepcke Park in Aspen.
Austin Colbert/The Aspen Times

Eleanor Carroll, right, and Josie Brands were among a group of local middle school students raising money for the Jackson Women’s Health Organization, at an abortion clinic in Mississippi, during a pro-women’s rights rally on Saturday, May 14, 2022, at Paepcke Park in Aspens.
Austin Colbert/The Aspen Times

Betty Wallach of the Pitkin County Democrats talks during a rally on Saturday, May 14, 2022, at Paepcke Park in Aspen.
Austin Colbert/The Aspen Times

A sign for the Pitkin County Democrats was on display during a pro-women’s rights rally on Saturday, May 14, 2022, at Paepcke Park in Aspen.
Austin Colbert/The Aspen Times

Eleanor Carroll was among a group of middle school students raising money for the Jackson Women’s Health Organization, an abortion clinic in Mississippi, during a pro-women’s rights rally on Saturday, May 14, 2022, at Paepcke Park in Aspen.
Austin Colbert/The Aspen Times

acolbert@aspentimes.com

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending