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New study aims to decide most beneficial form of physical activity for men’s health

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As part of Men’s Health Month, celebrated in June each year, researchers from the University of South Australia compare the health benefits of men ages 35 to 54 when they attend either traditional group bootcamp sessions or a modified Australian Rules Participate in football program.

Given that men have a shorter life expectancy than women – which is due to a higher prevalence of cardiovascular disease and diabetes – researchers want to know whether social exercise or group training in bootcamp format are better suited for improving men’s health.

The study is one of the first of its kind to go beyond the effects of exercise on physical health in Australian men.

Exercise is an underutilized way to increase physical activity, according to the World Health Organization, with the global cost of physical inactivity estimated at $ 54 billion a year for direct health care.

Lead researcher, UniSA PhD student Henry Blake, says the study hopes to address the lack of understanding of what form of physical activity is best for men’s health, noting, “When it comes to exercise, have it Australian men achieved the recommended level of physical activity with less than 50%.

“This is worrying given that men are more prone to chronic diseases, many of which can be prevented with regular exercise.

“We know that exercise and sport can help improve physical health. We also know that people are more likely to stick to an exercise program when done in a group setting.

“But what we don’t know is whether there are specific differences between group training or social sports that can bring better health benefits to Australian men – this is where our study comes in.

Blake adds, “Men in the study are given either a modified Australian Rules Football program or an outdoor boot camp / group practice circuit program where they train for two hours a week for 12 weeks.

“During this time, we collect health information through wrist-worn physical activity monitors, an exercise performance test, blood lipid and glucose levels, and an online questionnaire.

“By examining the effects of these exercise programs on a number of health and fitness markers, we hope to see how men respond – not just in terms of their physical health, but also their mental health and social well-being.”

The study will continue throughout 2021, with a new circuit boot camp and ALF exercise program starting in July. To find out more or to register your interest, click here

Men’s Health Month is celebrated in June each year

On the subject of matching items

June 15, 2021 – ESSA marks Men’s Health Week with the launch of a free eBook

June 9, 2021 – Men’s Health Week supported in Australia and New Zealand

June 16, 2020 – ESSA highlights the importance of physical activity for men’s mental health

June 11, 2019 – ESSA underlines the importance of exercise in this men’s health week

March 7, 2019 – Research has shown that men underestimate the health risks of heavy alcohol consumption

November 7, 2018 – ESSA supports the Movember Movement 2018 campaign to improve the health and wellbeing of men

June 12, 2018 – FIFO employee health and wellbeing will not be overlooked during Men’s Health Week

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Men’s Health

Powerlifting Coach Mark Bell Shares His Best Bench Press Tips

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The barbell bench press can feel like an easy exercise, especially if you’ve been training for a long time. However, the movement involves more than just lying on a bench and pushing the weight off your chest, especially considering what your goals are in the weight room.

Bench press is a great all-time chest size exercise, but it’s also an important (ahem) benchmark strength move, one of three events in the world of powerlifting competitions (along with deadlifts and barbell squats). When you’re a powerlifter, you’re not just working your way to grow to lift as much weight as you can. If you can’t get your bank up and running, you will never compete.

So some trainers might teach you how to bench press with a focus on hypertrophy in order to build as much muscle as possible. For others, like legendary powerlifter and trainer Mark Bell, who boasts 578 pounds of raw bench press PR, the goal is to push weight. Bell recently shared a long YouTube tutorial about the exercise and really took the time to break down what he thought were the most important aspects of the bench press. He teaches neuroscientist and podcaster Andrew Huberman, Ph.D. made the move with the assistance of trainer Nsima Inyang – but if you want to learn more about this mindset, his tips will work for you too.

How Mark Bell teaches the bench press

For Bell, it all starts with hand placement on the pole. It’s not fixed in any particular point – it depends on what is comfortable for the person doing the exercise. “Just make sure you have an even grip,” he says. Just be sure to press the rod firmly. “When we are pushing a barbell, we want to push it with everything we have because we are trying to initiate from our fingers to our toes. We want everyone to be involved in the bench press. “

As you lie back on the bench, Bell emphasizes the importance of having your chest in an upright position to maintain a neutral spine. “When our back is in a neutral position and our head is in a neutral position – it’s not too far down, not too high – we can express most of the force through our extremities, in this case our arms.”

Men health

When it comes to moving the weight, Bell has a counter-intuitive tip: pull the bar out of the rack instead of pushing it. But there is a method to madness – pushing the weight outward puts your shoulders in a bad position once it is time to get your body into position for the actual press. Especially if you are working with a lot of weight, be prepared to get safely into press mode.

As you lower the weight on your chest, Bell recommends aiming for a point near your sternum that is comfortable to the touch. Tip: If you’re working with a larger belly, use this to shorten your range of motion to make lifting easier.

From here, Bell rewinds a bit to talk about positioning on the bench. He admits that there is controversy over arching the back – but he quickly makes it clear that dramatic postures, in which athletes with shoulders and buttocks as the only points of contact on the bench, are not the goal here. “We’re not trying to arch the lower back,” he says. “We’re aggressively arching our upper backs though, trying to take our shoulders and really screw them into the bank.” This concept is no different from other exercises like the deadlift and squat, where you emphasize “screwing” your feet into the ground to drive down to create strength.

To get this bow, pull yourself down on the bench with the bar. Can’t you find out Let a spotter grab you by the traps to get you into position. Just be careful not to move your body too much and slide down the bench. Then focus on activating your lower body by placing your feet on the floor. “I like it when my heels hit the ground,” says Bell. “Even if you enjoy being on tiptoe, you want to keep your heels all the way down to the floor for your entire range of motion.” That’s because you want to be in a position where your knee is lower than your hip.

Next, Bell says that the key to your arm positioning is to have your bones stacked with your wrist and fists above your elbows and your elbows close to your body. Keeping your arms closed can shorten your range of motion, which in turn makes lifting easier. You can also use your lats and triceps to support your chest from this position.

“Downstairs, if you get it right, you’ll almost feel like you can pull the weight in and be really strong and explosive when you push yourself back up,” he says. When you’re at this lower point, Bell recommends trying “bend the bar” – sometimes at MH we recommend trying to “break the bar” – by rotating your elbows from the outside. This will allow you to get better leverage for your elevator.

When Huberman takes over, Bell has a few more comments on the reach. Remember: how you feel is much more important than an arbitrary position. Be on the lookout for more tips and hacks on how to bench press even harder.


Brett Williams, fitness editor at Men’s Health, is a NASM CPT certified trainer and former professional football player and tech reporter who divides his exercise time between strength and conditioning training, martial arts, and running.

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Men’s Health

How This Man Lost 35 Pounds and Got Shredded in Just 5 Months

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Lawyer Suang Wijaya, 33, had been slowly gaining weight in recent years, but noted that his weight gain “accelerated” during the pandemic. “Most of it was diet,” he says. “Also, when I had a busy time, I would go out without exercising for a few weeks. I wasn’t feeling too comfortable because my office clothes were suffocating a bit!

In his heaviest form, Suang weighed almost 160 pounds – but it wasn’t until a crucial moment in the work that he realized how much he needed to change.

“My team at work had won an important criminal case,” he explains. “After nine years in prison and a potential death penalty, our client was found innocent and released from prison. Before he returned to his home country, we served him a steak. Our photo with the client was posted on the news was a happy occasion, I just noticed how bloated I looked! So I felt like I had to do something. “

Suang came to Ultimate Performance Singapore and started training with a personal trainer. He did three strength training sessions each week with his trainer and then another three workouts alone, consisting of a mixture of upper and lower body exercises, as instructed by his trainer. After losing 2.2 pounds (1 kg) in his first week, Suang felt motivated to keep pushing himself.

“I’ve learned how important it is to push myself harder with every training session,” he says. “I also learned to do the exercises correctly and safely.”

Just as important as the exercise was the changes Suang made to his diet. “Before Ultimate Performance, I didn’t know about calories, how many calories I had in a day, and how to track calories,” he says. “This trip taught me about calories and the importance of calorie tracking … I now have a better relationship with food and no longer worry about the frequent business lunches I have with my customers.”

Over the course of five months, Suang lost approximately 35 pounds. “My family, friends and colleagues noticed it straight away,” he recalls. “They were very curious about my exercise and diet program. Some of them hired personal trainers themselves!”

“I definitely felt a lot healthier,” he adds. “I have the feeling that I sleep better at night and also get sick less often. Through this trip I also know how important health and fitness are … The first step is always the hardest. After that it will be much more manageable. “


Philip Ellis is a UK freelance writer and journalist specializing in pop culture, relationships and LGBTQ + topics.

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Men’s Health

Lanarkshire band raises charity funds with new track tackling male suicide

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A Lanarkshire band celebrated the launch of their latest single with an incredible fundraiser for a mental health charity.

The new track from The Naked Feedback, titled Boys Can Cry, explores the suicide rate of men, a topic that is close to their hearts.

The Blantyre band has partnered with the charity Tiny Changes, founded in memory of the late Frightened Rabbit singer Scott Hutchison, who took his own life in 2018.

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Through the release, the musicians have raised more than £ 1000. And as part of their effort, two of the boys completed a sponsored run from Glasgow city center to Blantyre.

Singer and guitarist Dean Anderson and drummer Derek Whiteford made the 10-mile performance on the day of release as there were many donors to support the cause.

The idea came after the band got stranded after a night out in Glasgow a few years ago and returned almost on foot as the wait for a taxi was too long.

In the end, they thought against it, but decided to take on the challenge of celebrating their new song – and all for a good cause.

Dean Anderson and Derek Whiteford after the 10 mile run

Speaking of the track, The Naked Feedback hopes to raise awareness about men’s mental health and the alarming rate of suicides in recent years.

It also looks at the mental struggles people have faced over the past 18 months after being hit by the pandemic.

Dean told Lanarkshire Live, “Boys Can Cry is about the struggles that people with mental health problems bring about, but also about the social stigmata that keep the issues from being addressed or addressed.

“The track itself is very aggressive and intrusive, while the lyrical content is a bit softer and almost like a cry for help.

“That was on purpose. Even today it is a taboo for a man to express his feelings and to be written off as weak or not a real man.

“The aggressive music symbolizes this old way of thinking about masculinity, but the gentler message runs parallel.”

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It’s also a topic for Dean, who recently lost friends to suicide.

He added, “A lot of people I knew about the lockdown committed suicide. Also, I think everyone’s mental health is in poor health as we were all locked inside.

“The track is more of an overview of central / western Scotland’s mental health affected by lockdowns and the pandemic.

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“The line ‘Boys Can Cry, They Shouldn’t Die, Is One Man Enough When He’s Dead?’ sums up the message we’re trying to get across and the topic we’re trying to keep in the spotlight. “

The charity campaign raised a total of £ 1005 for Tiny Changes, raised through a Just Giving page, monetary donations and a generous contribution from HSBC.

The online fundraiser is still active and you can donate here.

And you can listen to Boys Can Cry on Spotify or visit the band’s website for more information.

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