Connect with us

Women’s Health

Contraception, Planned Parenthood dominate debate as Missouri Senate returns to Capitol • Missouri Independent

Published

on

Senator Bob Onder, a Republican from Lake St. Louis (photo courtesy Missouri Senate Communications).

If state lawmakers approve Governor Mike Parson’s proposed restrictions on Planned Parenthood’s participation in state medical funding, it would cost the organization no money.

Legislators are back in session this week because they failed to raise supplier taxes earlier this year important to Medicaid funding following a push by Conservatives in the Missouri Senate who decided to prevent Planned Parenthood from receiving taxpayers’ money through the Medicaid program

As a concession to these senators, Parson’s request for a special session to renew taxes included a provision that would discourage Planned Parenthood from becoming a vendor for the uninsured women’s health program. This $ 11.5 million program provides family planning services to low-income women who would otherwise not qualify for Medicaid.

But Planned Parenthood of the St. Louis Region and Southwest Missouri and Planned Parenthood Great Plains “are not receiving government-funded reimbursements under the uninsured women’s health program,” Angie Postal, vice president of education, public policy and community involvement for Planned Parenthood of the St Louis during a conference call with reporters on Wednesday morning.

The special session started shortly after noon on Wednesday. The goal of the legislature is to have a bill passed and ready for signature by Parson by next Wednesday, the last day of the state financial year.

The focus of the measures will initially be on the State Senate, where a bill to extend supplier taxes will be presented died early in the morning the last day of this year’s regular meeting. Senate leaders plan to debate and vote on the bill on Friday and Saturday, with House measures expected to follow early next week.

During the regular session, the abortion policy failed to expand taxes when lawmakers tried for the first time in 30 years to use them as a vehicle to pass borders some contraceptive medications and devices and to rule out planned parenthood Providing services to every Medicaid customer.

Service provider taxes, known as federal reimbursement lump sums, have been used since 1992 to fund a significant portion of the Medicaid program in Missouri. According to the figures quoted by Parson on Monday, taxes on hospitals, nursing homes and other providers are to provide US $ 591 million as direct support and to provide the state with US $ 1.5 billion in federal matching funds in the coming fiscal year.

Without renewal, taxes will expire on September 30th.

The impasse became more and more frustrating for Parson at the beginning of the financial year. On several occasions in the past few weeks, an agreement among the Republicans seemed near.

On Monday, Parson presented the General Assembly with an ultimatum, called for an agreement that would allow swift adoption by July 1st. Without them, he would cut $ 722 million from the state budget for the coming year.

“For those who want to move the goalposts again,” said Parson on Monday, “you know that you and you alone have this.”

However, the opening of the session could not suppress the republican power struggles.

sen. Bob under, talk about KCUR on Wednesday morningParson said he was trying to thwart its efforts to prevent Planned Parenthood from providing Medicaid services, noting that the governor’s public statements were praised by Senate minority leader John Rizzo, D-Independence.

“The governor is doing exactly what an abortion advocate like Senator Rizzo wants to do, which is to put the money into Planned Parenthood,” said Onder, R-Lake St. Louis.

Rather than restricting the provisions aimed at planned parenting to the health program for uninsured women, the ban should be as broad as possible, Onder said in an interview with The Independent.

“We should defuse Planned Parenthood throughout the Medicaid program,” said Onder, “not just in the health program for uninsured women.”

What it means

Healthcare providers and reproductive rights advocates say that attempts by Republicans to define common forms of birth control as drugs that promote abortion are contrary to medically recognized science.

The proposed bills would exclude contraceptives such as intrauterine devices, better known as IUDs, and several contraceptives from reimbursement under the state Medicaid program “if they are used to induce an abortion”.

One of the drugs is levonorgestrel, which is also used in many long-term contraceptives.

The association of drugs and IUDs with abortions is medically inaccurate and misleading, said Colleen McNicholas, chief medical officer for Planned Parenthood for the St. Louis and Southwest Missouri area.

The full list of prohibited drugs includes mifepristone and misoprostol, levonorgestrel, ulipristal acetate – sold under the brand name Ella – “and other progesterone antagonists”.

Mifepristone and misoprostol, alone and together, are widely used to induce abortion in early pregnancy.

IUDs and emergency contraceptives work to prevent pregnancy – not terminate it, medical experts said in interviews with The Independent and in an online press conference Wednesday.

Even Onder, a doctor, found that IUDs prevent pregnancy, not terminate it. During his appearance on KCUR, he said that Parson’s call read “after the word IUD” for “abortion”.

“Honestly, IUDs are not used for abortions … This language, which is still discussed and written as we speak, is not going to ban IUDs for birth control or really anything else,” Onder told KCUR, and later added, “After At the current state of the language there is probably no reason to even include it.

Emergency contraceptives such as Plan B or Ella are usually taken as soon as possible, but no more than five days after sexual intercourse. They work to delay ovulation, the release of an egg from an ovary. If a person’s body has already started this process, the contraceptives would not be successful in preventing pregnancy, McNicholas said.

In addition to preventing ovulation, other forms of contraception, such as IUDs or hormonal birth control pills, can help change the environment around the uterus, making it more difficult for sperm to reach and fertilize an egg.

Missouri law defines life as from the moment of conceptionwhich the law outlines as “the fertilization of a woman’s egg by a man’s sperm”. But pregnancy occurs when a fertilized egg is implanted in the lining of the uterus, McNicholas said.

“What matters is that there are certainly ideological thoughts about when to begin pregnancy, but timing of pregnancy is out of the question in the medical community,” McNicholas said.

Combining birth control with abortion-inducing drugs is thought to create confusion and uncertainty, said Michelle Trupiano, executive director of the Missouri Family Health Council, Inc.

“The concern about language is that it is left to non-healthcare professional interpretation and could have a deterrent effect on healthcare professionals and the use of IUDs as it creates uncertainty that people are not really sure what it is is. “and is not allowed,“ said Trupiano.

Elizabeth Allemann, the medical director of the Missouri Family Health Council Inc. and a family doctor with her own practice in Columbia, said she was particularly concerned about legislators’ access to emergency contraception, which the sooner it is taken and, in some cases, the more effective it is States offered to victims of sexual assault.

“Lifting barriers for emergency contraception means taking them off the table,” said Allemann.

Ultimately, restricting access to birth control would likely lead to more unwanted pregnancies, in addition to higher costs for the state, families and the birth of babies, Allemann said.

“And what we do know is that unwanted pregnancies are much more dangerous,” said Allemann. “There is a much higher risk of complications, premature birth, stillbirth, and maternal complications, including maternal death.”

Senate meeting

The special session opened on Wednesday in the Missouri Senate with the submission of three bills – one that extends taxes for five years, one that includes contraceptive language and the prohibition of planned parenting as stated in Parson’s appeal, and one that all of this combined in a single bill.

That alone was enough to arouse suspicion among Republican lawmakers, who were the strongest proponents of introducing the restrictions.

“The last time we discussed it, I had the impression that we were going to make an invoice,” said Senator Paul Wieland, R-Imperial and sponsor of the original language on contraceptives.

The draft bills are heard in the Senate Approval Committee, which passed extension laws in its regular session without any language targeting contraception or planned parenting. If the Senate receives a bill that meets the terms of Parson’s appeal, Onder can see a scenario in which further changes are ruled out.

“It would be a grotesque abuse of Senate rules to throw something like that out of order,” said Onder.

The decision would be challenged, and he warned other senators that Missouri Right to Life would evaluate the vote.

Rizzo offered a bill that would extend taxes by five years. He said all other issues should be set aside.

“This has given us the best return on our investment when it comes to health grants in the state of Missouri,” said Rizzo.

The timing of trying to block birth control and attack planned parenting is suspect, said Senator Brian Williams, D-Ferguson.

The resignation of US Senator Roy Blunt has created opportunities in Republican areas. Several state senators are planning to run in the 4th Congressional District, which US MP Vicky Hartzler is giving up to run for Blunt’s seat.

“I think it’s about political ingratiation,” said Williams. “I think it’s the people who want to make headlines about politics.”

Republicans dismissed this claim, arguing that President Joe Biden’s administration is seeking to repeal the Hyde Amendment preventing Medicaid from paying for abortions and that the Missouri Supreme Court should use its language on spending bills aimed at planned parenting has deleted.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Women’s Health

Plant-based food consumption associated with lower CVD risk

Published

on

August 04, 2021

Read for 3 minutes

Source / information

Published by:

Disclosure:
Choi does not report any relevant financial information. Glenn reports that she has received grants from the Banting & Best Diabetes Center Tamarack Graduate Award in Diabetes Research, the Nora Martin Fellowship in Nutritional Sciences, the Ontario Graduate Scholarship, and the Peterborough KM Hunter Charitable Foundation Graduate Award; Consulting fees from Solo GI Nutrition; and fees from the Soy Nutrition Institute. Please refer to the study for all relevant financial information from the other authors.

ADD SUBJECT TO EMAIL ALERTS

Receive an email when new articles are published on

Please enter your email address to receive an email when new articles are published on . “data-action =” subscribe “> subscribe

We could not process your request. Please try again later. If this problem persists, please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Back to Healio

According to two studies published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, a more plant-centered diet was associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease in both young adults and postmenopausal women.

“Previous research has focused on individual nutrients or individual foods, but there is little data on a plant-centered diet and long-term risk of cardiovascular disease.” Yuni Choi, PhD, Postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Epidemiology and Community Health and the Department of Food Science and Nutrition at the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, said in a press release.

a bowl of lettuce and chickpeas

Source: Adobe Stock

Young adults

The multicenter, prospective cohort study by Choi and colleagues included 4,946 adults, initially 18 to 30 years of age, without CVD. All participants were observed through 2018 and their diets were assessed using a validated nutritional history conducted through interviews. The quality of a plant-centered diet was assessed by the A Priori Diet Quality Score, with higher values ​​indicating higher consumption of nutrient-rich plant foods and lower consumption of high-fat meat products and less healthy plant foods.

The researchers observed 289 cases of CVD during the 32-year follow-up. A lower risk of cardiovascular disease was associated with long-term consumption and a switch to a plant-based diet. Those in the highest quintile of the time-varying mean diet scores had a reduced incidence of CVD compared to the lowest quintile (HR = 0.48; 95% CI 0.28-0.81). In the following 12 years in analysis of changes, an increase in diet scores over 13 years was also associated with a lower risk of CVD (HR = 0.33; 95% CI, 0.16-0.68).

Compared to the lowest quintile, the highest quintile of the 13-year diet change was associated with a 61% lower subsequent 12-year risk of CVD (HR = 0.39; 95% CI, 0.19-0.81). In addition, the researchers found strong inverse associations for CHD (HR = 0.21; 95% CI, 0.06-0.75) and CVD-related to hypertension (HR = 0.34; 95% CI, 0.16-0.75) , 74) with a time-varying average or diet change firmly favor those with a healthy plant-centered diet.

“A nutritious, plant-centered diet is beneficial for cardiovascular health. A plant-centered diet is not necessarily vegetarian, ”Choi said in the press release. “People can choose between plant-based foods that are as natural as possible and not heavily processed. We believe that from time to time individuals may ingest in moderation animal products such as unroasted poultry, unroasted fish, eggs, and low-fat dairy products. “

Post menopausal women

In another study, Andrea J. Glenn, MSc, from the University of Toronto’s Department of Nutrition Sciences, the Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Center, and the Toronto 3D Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical Trials Unit, and colleagues prospectively followed a cohort of 123,330 postmenopausal women without CVD from the Women’s Health Initiative from 1993 to 2017 Participants were evaluated to assess the relationship between compliance with a portfolio diet score and CVD scores.

The primary endpoints were CVD, CHD, and total stroke, and secondary endpoints included HF and atrial fibrillation.

The researchers observed a total of 13,365 CVD events, 5,640 CAD events, 4,440 stroke events, 1,907 HF events, and 929 AF events during a mean follow-up of 15.3 years.

There was an association between women adhering to the Portfolio Diet Score and a lower risk of CVD (HR = 0.89; 95% CI, 0.83-0.94), CHD (HR = 0 , 86; 95% CI, 0.78-0.95) and HF (HR = 0.83; 95% CI, 0.71-0.99 when comparing the highest quartile of adherence to the lowest. Es however, there was no association between adherence to the portfolio diet score and stroke (HR = 0.97; 95% CI 0.87-1.08) or AF (HR = 1.1; 95% CI 0.87) -1.38).

These results remained statistically significant even after several sensitivity analyzes.

“These results provide the strongest evidence yet of the long-term benefit of portfolio dieting in primary prevention of CVD, although our portfolio diet score in other cohorts / populations must be assessed to confirm these results,” the researchers wrote.

According to the researchers, the results of the PortfolioEX study, which looked at the effects of the Portfolio Diet plus exercise on a surrogate marker of atherosclerotic CVD risk, are ongoing.

Relation:

ADD SUBJECT TO EMAIL ALERTS

Receive an email when new articles are published on

Please enter your email address to receive an email when new articles are published on . “data-action =” subscribe “> subscribe

We could not process your request. Please try again later. If this problem persists, please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Back to Healio

Rx Nutrition Resource Center

Rx Nutrition Resource Center

Continue Reading

Women’s Health

You should be relaxing your pelvic floor, not just strengthening it

Published

on

We as women often talk about our pelvic floor muscles in terms of whether they are weak or not (Image: Getty Images / iStockphoto)

It’s a pounding, spasmodic feeling in the space two or three inches below my belly button, deep under the layers of skin and fat where my uterus sits.

The pain comes quickly in waves, so strong that I lose my train of thought or can no longer concentrate on my surroundings. Everything in me feels tense and tense, but as hard as I try, I can’t let go or relax.

It hurts so much that all I can do is sit in the aching sensation, so I have to go to bed.

I usually wake up an hour or two later and the feeling is less intense but still there. I still have to find a way to completely drive it off without simply spending the day waiting for a clean start in the morning. Painkillers are pointless and do nothing to reduce the strong grip that grips my body and squeezes everything inside me so tightly that I feel passed out.

It started in the depths of the lockdown last year – easily dismissed as a coincidence or a one-off, I remember feeling incredible discomfort and going straight to bed. At that time I traced it back to being a woman and forgot about it. But soon it happened again and then again. Sometimes the pain bled for the next day and the day after, and sometimes it went away as quickly as it appeared.

As someone in the women’s health field, I was at a loss when I tried to match my symptoms against one of the online resources available. I searched for “pelvic pain” and couldn’t pinpoint what was happening to my body with any of the disorders or syndromes reported on the NHS website. I had blood tests and everything seemed fine so why did I (seemingly random) pass out for days?

Help came unexpectedly from Clare Bourne, someone I once interviewed for an article and later followed on Instagram who worked as a pelvic health physiotherapist (a what? I hear you say. Yes, there is).

I explained what was going on and her first reaction was to ask her how I was feeling emotionally. It seemed like an odd question since the focus of our conversation was on my pelvic health, but I answered anyway.

I was stressed, I said, even though I didn’t feel stressed. I knew I was due to an increase in tension headaches and a general inability to relax.

As someone who has struggled with mental health in the past, I found it strange that my emotions felt balanced and even calm during one of the most difficult periods in history that many of us will go through.

Clare’s response was to see a pelvic health physiotherapist as it sounded like I had a hypertonic pelvic floor. ‘What does that mean?’ I asked. “It means,” she said, “that your pelvic floor muscles forgot to relax.”

As women, we often talk about our pelvic floor muscles in terms of whether they are weak or not. I remember squirming with embarrassment in an exercise class in 7th or 8th grade when all the girls were told to do kegel exercises, where you contract your pelvic floor muscles to strengthen them.

The health benefits of this type of exercise are well known as a strong pelvic floor is known to help with continence, increase the enjoyment of sex, and if you want to give birth one day, it will reduce the time for your body to recover.

It will take years to undo centuries of work in which the male body was privileged at the center of medical research

It seems strange now to think that at the age of 12, I took the time to squeeze and tone those muscles, as none of these issues were particularly relevant at the time. But still it can’t hurt, can it?

The problem is that in everything we as women talk about strengthening our pelvic floor, we talk much less about relaxation. It may sound so simple, but for some of us it is anything but.

As it turns out, knowing how to relax your pelvic floor is just as important as knowing how to strengthen it. Those who are unable to do so can experience all sorts of uncomfortable secondary problems, from pain to incontinence and problems with penetrative sex. And yet, when I look up the NHS website, there is little or no guidance for women who may be suffering from these problems, and even lower abdominal pain does not list it as a possible cause.

The problem is that symptoms increase during periods of acute stress, as I don’t know, during a pandemic. When it comes to research by women’s health journalist Sarah Graham, my experiences are unfortunately not unique. So why don’t we talk about it anymore? And why are so many of us so ill informed about how to care for our pelvic health?

As always, a general lack of research and information on women’s reproductive health is at the heart of the problem. The government recently attempted to address this with a women’s health strategy that called for evidence earlier this year. I hope it touches on some of the many ways in which women’s agony is systematically ignored and the many areas in which medical treatment centered (and evolved) on the male body has met different challenges or does not take into account realities that women face.

It will take years to undo centuries of work in which the male body was privileged at the center of medical research.

But in the meantime, it seems to me that the most important thing we can do is talk to each other, to our friends, to our mothers and to our children about our experiences and how we can maintain our pelvic health.

I was fortunate to have the resources because of my job to find a way to understand what was going on and then get access to treatment – but a lot of women didn’t want to.

Despite this benefit, it took over a year from the onset of symptoms to the first visit to a pelvic health physiotherapist through the NHS. During this time I canceled work (and lost money), was late delivering items, spent entire weekends on the sofa and – during the limited time I was actually allowed to socialize – had to go to dinner or meet up with friends renounce because of the pain.

I know I’m not the only one going through this because I’ve connected with a lot of other women through social media who have had the same experience.

The good news is that there is a solution, but it takes time and working closely with a professional to learn how to loosen your pelvis and relax completely. It’s frustrating to think how long I would have had to experience all of these ailments if I hadn’t known exactly what to say to the GP (who told me that pelvic health physiotherapy is a scarce resource for women who are born and what not Case is).

More: women

To me, it’s just another example of how we are expected to tolerate and endure so much pain as women. It is encouraging to see politicians finally being promised to address this. I hope the government’s strategy will help address any shortcomings in our current health service related to women and reduce the gender health gap.

However, what it cannot and cannot do – for me and the millions of other women who have suffered the impossible obstacle course of getting a diagnosis for chronic health problems that are specific to the female body – is to give us the time back that is already over lost in an unimaginable amount of physical (and emotional) agony. Don’t we all deserve better?

Do you have a story you’d like to share? Contact us by email at jess.austin@metro.co.uk.

Do share your views in the comments below.

MORE: Almost all pregnant women hospitalized with Covid have not been vaccinated

MORE: I developed an unhealthy relationship with my Fitbit – so we broke up

MORE: Bullying at work can have a huge impact on your mental health – how can you deal with it?

The lifestyle email from Metro.co.uk

Get all the important lifestyle news and features straight to your inbox.

Unconvinced? Find out more

Continue Reading

Women’s Health

Kristina Timanovskaya: Belarusian Olympic sprinter boards Vienna-bound flight out of Tokyo

Published

on

The 24-year-old athlete was scheduled to compete in the women’s 200m at the Tokyo Olympics on Monday, but said team officials tried to force her back to Belarus against her will after criticizing sports authorities. Her dire plight has dominated global headlines around the Games, and while her comments were not overtly political, her case has fueled fears for the safety of those speaking out against Belarusian officials.

Timanovskaya arrived at Narita Airport on Wednesday morning with luggage and wearing blue jeans and a blue sweatshirt. Later she boarded the Austrian Airlines flight OS52.

The athlete was to travel to Warsaw, Poland, where the country’s prime minister had offered her safe refuge and a humanitarian visa. It is unclear whether she wants to change trains in Vienna on the way to Poland, stay in Austria or travel somewhere else.

In an Instagram post, Timanovskaya said team officials forced her to pack her things and said she would be cut out of the Olympic team and flown back to Minsk. She was taken to Haneda Airport on Sunday but refused to board the flight from Japan as she feared for her safety and would be detained in her home country.

Timanovskaya said she was threatened by team officials for speaking out against a decision to include her in the 4 × 400 meter relay without her consent – an event she had not previously attended. She said her coaches didn’t tell her who made the decision to send her home.

Speaking to CNN on Tuesday, Timanovskaya said she was upset that she was denied her chance to participate in the Olympics.

“I was ready for the games, especially for the 200 meters. They took away my dream of the Olympics. They took this chance,” she said.

International Olympic Committee spokesman Mark Adams said Wednesday that the IOC would set up a “disciplinary committee” to clarify the facts of the case and, as part of it, hear national coach Yuri Moisevich and Belarusian sports official Artur Shumak. Adams also said that the National Olympic Committee of Belarus had submitted a written report on the situation.

On Tuesday, the IOC opened a formal investigation into the incident.

The Belarusian NOK said Timanovskaya had been withdrawn from the games because of her “emotional and psychological state”.

However, Timanovskaya refutes this claim, saying that she has not been examined by a doctor and that she has no health or psychological problems.

Timanovskaya told CNN that she realized she might be in danger when she called her grandmother before being taken to the airport by team officials.

“She said that I should not go back to Belarus because it was not safe for me there. She said that they said bad things about me on (state) television: that I was sick, that I had mental health problems,” said Timanovskaya said.

“My parents understood that if they said things like that about me on TV, most likely I would not be able to return to my home in Belarus… I don’t know where they would take me. Maybe to jail or maybe to a psychological hospital. “

At the airport, Timanovskaya said she used a translation app on her phone to type that she needed help and showed it to a Japanese police officer.

Although their Instagram post was not explicitly political, Belarusian athletes were faced with retaliatory measures last year after mass protests against the strong President Alexander Lukashenko, who has ruled the Eastern European country since 1994, and were arrested and expelled from national teams for criticizing the government in Bei During the protests, people were arrested and brutally suppressed by the authorities amid widespread reports of ill-treatment and torture. As the Timanovskaya case developed, a Belarusian activist was found dead on Tuesday in a park in the Ukrainian capital, Kiev. Vitaliy Shishov was the head of the Kiev-based Belarusian House in Ukraine (BDU) organization, which helps Belarusians escape persecution.

The activist was found hanged in a wooded area of ​​a park near his home on Tuesday. Ukrainian police opened criminal proceedings and said they would investigate whether Shishov’s death was suicide or “willful murder that was supposed to look like suicide”.

What’s next with Timanovskaya?

It is unclear where Timanovskaya will land, but several offers have been made to the athlete. Her husband, Arseni Zdanewich, left Belarus and entered Ukraine on Monday.

Poland’s Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki said he had spoken to Timanovskaya and assured her that she could count on Poland’s support. Deputy Foreign Minister Marcin Przydacz told Sky News that she expected her to visit Poland and “stay there for at least a few days”.

He said Poland gave her the opportunity to continue her sporting career in the country but “of course it’s up to her,” he said.

Kristina Timanovskaya at the Austrian Airlines gate at Narita International Airport on August 4th.

“We know that your training center is in Austria and your trainer is also stationed in Austria. She is waiting for her husband to come to Warsaw. So it will probably be her decision whether to stay in Poland or continue somewhere else. “Travel to any other European country and she is very welcome to stay in Poland.”

Przydacz said it was “most important” that Poland intervened and prevented Belarus from “kidnapping people to force them to return home against their will”.

“We gave them the opportunity to come and live in Poland safely and securely,” he said.

Poland has received 120,000 visa applications from Belarus since President Lukashenko’s controversial election victory last August, said Przydacz.

CNN’s Nick Paton Walsh, Amy Cassidy, Antiona Mortensen and Gawon Bae contributed to the coverage.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending