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Train Like Olympic Gymnast Simone Biles With This 30-Minute Workout

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  • Get in the mood for your inner Olympic gymnast with this gym-inspired workout from Danielle Gray, accessible on IGTV when you need it.
  • The movements focus on the flexibility and strength gymnasts need to achieve their goals.
  • Any skill level can follow this 30-minute bodyweight workout and look forward to the upcoming Tokyo Olympics.

    With the Summer Olympics fast approaching, athletes who have earned a coveted spot on Team USA are stepping up their training to peak for Tokyo. The Olympic champion Simone Biles is back in the gym and shows her followers in a cute little boomerang a look into the training facilities with the heading “Back to work, grinding doesn’t stop.”

    The rest of the fans watching from home can prepare to cheer on all of your favorites like an athlete. Women’s Health has the perfect workout challenge for you. Danielle Gray, founder of Train Like A Gymnast, created a 30-minute gym-inspired sweat sesh that features some of the strength and conditioning exercises that gymnasts use to stay powerful. These plyometric and calisthenics moves are sure to help you connect with your inner Simone.

    The training consists of burpees, kneeling tuck lifts, v-ups, plank push-ups and lunge push-throughs. Even if it is a routine inspired by professionals, any level of experience can follow and modify. To decrease the intensity, remove each jump or swap double arm / leg for a single arm / leg variant.

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    These are the moves gymnasts use to stay strong, flexible, and prepare for any floor exercise, jump, or balance beam. “These come straight from gymnastics training. Fundamentals and body contouring are important for building a solid foundation for the advanced skills you see on TV at the Olympics.” Gray told Women’s Health. “And believe me, elite gymnasts still do the basics a lot.”

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    Bodyweight gym training:

    Gray begins with a warm-up that includes back injuries in a march. And show your toes for a bit of gym flare. Then she switches to upper body push-ups before the real work begins.

    1. 10 candlesticks burpees – In honor of WH’s Burpee Challenge, which she helped develop, Gray added burpees to this workout. Burpees are also great for reflexes, functional strength, mobility, freedom of movement, and core control. Hold up your hands for an extra challenge.
    2. 5 squats lift – These are great if you are doing a handstand or want to build more strength in your wrists. Even if your feet can’t make it across the floor, you will still feel it in your arms, says Gray.
    3. 5 one-legged v-ups with 10-second hollow hold – Gray calls them a staple in gymnastics and daily practice. “Strengthening and training the core directly is an important part of conditioning a gymnast,” she says. “The pike and hollow body shapes are used all the time in gymnastics and mastering everyone can make skills easier in the future.”
    4. 10 push-ups on plank – Pushups are key for gymnasts to building a strong upper body. “As you build stronger triceps and core, you can move faster and use your straight arms for reversals, blocks, sways, wobbles, and quick adjustments for intermediate abilities,” notes Gray.
    5. 10 one-legged lunges push-throughs – According to Gray, this movement helps with speed, strength and explosiveness. She recommends keeping your chest slightly forward and bringing your knee up to your chest.
      1. Do you feel it already? “Hopefully you will sweat and begin to understand what gymnasts do,” says Gray. Add this workout to your workout this month to prepare your body and mind for the Olympics.

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    Women’s Health

    FIGO 2021 World Congress Blog – Day Five

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    Investigation of Controversies in Treatment at the Israel Forum

    The fifth day of the FIGO 2021 World Congress began with a session on treatment controversies, which took place live on the Israel Forum and was streamed directly on our virtual platform. During that session there was a fascinating debate about the use of valaciclovir to prevent vertical transmission of cytomegalovirus. Dr. Yacov Amir spoke first, suggesting that valaciclovir was an effective form of treatment, followed by Dr. Rinat Gabbay-Benziv, who argued that it had its limits. The session ended with a panel discussion and questions and answers between the speakers and moderators.

    COVID-19 and the women’s health crisis

    We then had the honor of enjoying the BN Purandare lecture organized by the Federation of Obstetric and Gynecological Societies of India (FOGSI). Dr. Alpesh Gandhi gave a keynote on the “Women’s Health Crisis During the COVID-19 Pandemic”.

    In his lecture, Dr. Gandhi provided a comprehensive look at the many impacts of the pandemic on women’s health, including an increase in maternal mortality, limited access to family planning and abortion services, delays in gynecological surgeries, and a lack of access to COVID vaccinations for pregnant women. He stressed that the pandemic had resulted in women avoiding health facilities and highlighted the essential role of community health workers, midwives and telemedicine in addressing this challenge.

    Learn more about FIGO’s pen surgery training initiative

    Following this, the FIGO Committee for Fistulas and Genital Trauma organized a meeting on the FIGO Fistula Surgery training initiative. Gillian Slinger, Senior Project Manager of the FIGO initiative, started the session with an update on the initiative’s recent successes and future plans to expand the training program. Dr. Fekade Aneyachew Aklilu described the role of trainers in delivering fistula surgery training in resource-poor environments and the challenges one faces in becoming a trainer.

    Dr. Hillary Mabeya then gave a presentation of advice for aspiring fistula surgery trainees and gave an insight into what to expect when training to become a fistula surgeon. Dr. Andrew Browning closed the session with a talk on persistent incontinence after fistula repair – with an emphasis on diagnosis, management and corrective surgery.

    The meeting was rounded off by a discussion between Ms. Slinger and Dr. Mabeya on the importance of continuous training, the essential role of working with larger teams beyond surgeons, and the role FIGO has played in eradicating fistulas around the world.

    Prenatal diagnostics

    Later, the FIGO Maternal and Fetal Health Track organized a session on prenatal diagnostics. We first heard from Professor Lyn Chitty who gave a talk on rapid fetal exome sequencing for the diagnosis of monogenic conditions in fetuses with structural abnormalities. She focused on explaining what rapid fetal exome sequencing is, what it will deliver, and provided an overview of how it is currently being used in the UK NHS. Professor Svetlana Rechitsky focused on pre-implantation genetic testing (PGT-A) with Embryo Selection, in particular on the management of mosaic embryos.

    Dr. James Goldberg spoke about advanced pre-conceptual vehicle screening, focusing on the medical history, recent changes to key guidelines and guidelines, and the clinical utility of these tests. Dr. Antoni Borrell concluded the session with a presentation on maternal plasma aneuploidy testing for all chromosomes, focusing mainly on cell-free DNA (cfDNA) testing.

    Global Perspectives on Self-Administered Abortion

    We then had an exciting live panel on “Spreading the Revolution – Why Investing in Self-Administered Abortions is the Way Forward to Realizing Women’s Right to Physical Autonomy”, led by Dr. Dorothy Shaw. The panel started with an introduction by Dr. Bela Ganatra on developing the World Health Organization’s recommendations on medical abortion over the past 20 years.

    An exciting conversation followed between Dr. Shaw, Dr. Ganatra, Dr. Laura Gil, Professor Dame Lesley Regan, Mr. Shabin Shrestha and Ms. Jedidah Maina. The discussion focused on the main obstacles to self-directed abortion, namely the over-regulation of medical abortion, criminalization, social stigma and a lack of understanding of the issue.

    The speakers shared valuable insights from around the world, used their platform to demand an approach that prioritizes listening to women and trusts them to know how to make decisions about their reproductive life. Speakers highlighted the key role of evidence in lobbying, improving access to information and training, removing barriers to access to safe abortion services, and appreciating the voices of people who have had experiences seeking abortion care.

    End the day in Europe

    The day ended with the Europe Regional Evening, organized by the European Board and College of Obstetrics and Gynecology (EBCOG), which started with a dedicated panel on the effects of COVID on OBGYN education in the region. We then heard from several speakers about examples of European learning fields. The evening ended with a conversation about OBGYN care for migrants in Europe. Each session of the evening was pleasantly ended with musical interludes by the renowned opera singer Danae Kontora, whose incredible voice could be heard at various points on the night of study.

    Recordings of the entire meeting will be available on demand on the virtual congress platform within 24 hours.

    To learn more about the congress or to register, visit www.figo2021.org.

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    Women’s Health

    Program focused on women vets health care could become mandatory for transitioning troops

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    Following a proposal proposed by Congress to ensure women get the information they need about post-military health support services, transition into health care training could become a requirement for women service members leaving their ranks.

    “It should be a compulsory program where female veterans can come together and talk about some of their problems in a safe place so that the Department of Defense and their military departments understand what their problems might be,” said Rep. Julia Brownley. D-California, on Tuesday.

    “I think one of the problems is that women don’t even know about the program or have access to the program. And certainly, if it is not compulsory, you might miss it completely. “

    TIED TOGETHER

    Your comments came at a House Veterans Affairs Committee hearing on available support services for female troops and veterans.

    As part of the discussion, panel members praised the transition to women’s health training program jointly run by VA and Defense Department officials over the past three years to provide more targeted information on post-military health care and support services.

    But despite good reviews of the program so far, the panel’s lawmakers said they felt more needs to be done to promote it to ensure that female veterans are aware of it and have access to training.

    Only about 37 percent of all female veterans in America are enrolled in VA health programs, according to a Congressional Research Service report earlier this year. For comparison: around half of all male veterans are enrolled in the system.

    Health care officials have said that in transitioning from military life, it is critical to ensure veterans know and understand their available benefits – especially medical care – how to access them, and offer solutions to challenges such as financial problems, mental health issues, and thoughts of suicide .

    Only about 1,500 female service workers have completed the Women’s Health Transitioning Training in recent years, which is currently a self-directed online course offered through the Transition Assistance Program. Of this group, 54 percent chose to enroll in VA health care after completing the course.

    Lawrencia Pierce, assistant director of VA’s Office for Outreach, Transition and Economic Development, said officials plan to expand the program in the coming months to include virtual instructors to allow for greater engagement and feedback from course participants.

    But William Mansell, director of the Defense Support Service Center, said officials hadn’t thought of making the course compulsory for women who are leaving the military because they prefer to keep the transition classes as flexible as possible to allow the transition forces be able to choose the training that best suits them needs.

    “There are alternative avenues and different levels of support that allow service members to control their transition processes,” he said. “And if a changing service member states that they need this training, or if their self-assessment indicates that they need it, then they will get it.”

    TIED TOGETHER

    The Women in Military Service to America Memorial, the only national museum honoring military women, celebrated its 15th anniversary on October 20, 2012.

    However, Browley and other lawmakers said this approach may not be strong enough, especially given the preconceived notion that VA health care is more focused on helping men than women.

    “When women leave, they need to know what the options are,” she said. “And many of them leave on a traumatic basis. So many women are subjected to harassment or assault that happened to them during their military service. “

    There are currently no pending laws on the matter, but Brownley indicated that if the expansion of training progresses slowly, she could begin creating such a plan.

    Along with the addition of virtual coaches, Defense and VA officials said they plan to increase funding for the program in the coming months to allow for wider program visibility through existing programs and transition networks.

    Leo covers Congress, Veterans Affairs, and the White House for Military Times. He has been reporting on Washington, DC since 2004, focusing on military personnel and veteran politics. His work has received numerous awards, including a 2009 Polk Award, a 2010 National Headliner Award, the IAVA Leadership in Journalism Award, and the VFW News Media Award.

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    How To Use Your Phone To Stay Happy And Healthy

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    The NHS has promised a digital revolution to transform patient care. The wider use of technology is at the heart of a ten-year plan to reduce disease by developing digital tools that help the public better manage disease.

    However, a study published yesterday by the Organization for the Review of Care and Health Apps evaluating digital health tools like smartphone apps for healthcare found that older people often miss out on the benefits of technology.

    Good Health looks at just a few of the smartphone apps that could improve the health of the elderly

    It found that GPs recommend NHS-approved apps to more than twice as many people under 35 as people over 55 – although the majority of older people said they’d love to try NHS-approved health apps.

    Patient Safety Learning, a charity that works for improved standards in health care, said doctors fail to educate older people about the wide range of NHS-supported health apps that could benefit their wellbeing.

    Good Health looks at just a few of the smartphone apps that could improve the health of the elderly, while Dr. Trisha Macnair, an elderly care specialist from Phyllis Tuckwell Hospice in Farnham, Surrey, delivers her verdict. . .

    Reminders for Coping with Dementia

    My House Of Memories, free on Google Play on Android devices or AppStore on Apple devices

    Dementia, which affects around 800,000 mostly elderly people in the UK, not only robs people of their memories, but often causes restlessness. My House Of Memories would like to help by saving images or sounds from the past that those affected find comforting.

    This could simply be a picture of old currency from her childhood – like a ten shilling note – or a Singer sewing machine that brings back fond memories of a relative who made clothes for her.

    Personalized pictures – such as pictures of favorite objects, loved ones or old school friends – can also be uploaded to the app.

    Expert judgment: “From caring for people with dementia, we know that remembering beautiful and distant memories can help them deal with their illness. It allows them to feel engaged, which improves their mood and quality of life. So I’m sure this could be beneficial – although it will take a caregiver’s help to use it. ‘

    How to Use Your Phone to Stay Happy and Healthy

    Medicine sent to your door

    Hey pharmacist, it’s free on Google Play or the AppStore

    According to charity Age UK, around four million people over 65 in the UK take five or more prescription drugs – many of them every day.

    For elderly patients, ensuring uninterrupted supply of these drugs is essential, even when many are home-bound.

    The NHS-approved Hey Pharmacist app is designed to relieve headaches by allowing patients to order repeat prescriptions through the app at any pharmacy in England and have them delivered to their door.

    After downloading the app and sending a prescription request, it is checked by the patient’s family doctor and delivered within a few days. The app can remind the patient to order another prescription when supplies are running low.

    Expert judgment: “This is really useful. I work in elderly care and I’m constantly trying to convince patients to use his type of technology to make sure they don’t run out of medication.

    “Those who are familiar with smartphone apps seem pretty easy to understand – but it can be more difficult for those in their late 70s.”

    How to Use Your Phone to Stay Happy and Healthy

    Take a home stress test

    EXi, free of charge on Google Play or AppStore

    General practitioners who want to assess an older person’s fitness often refer them to a six-minute walk test – how far they can go in that time. It is a measure of aerobic fitness and a crucial guide to overall wellbeing.

    The EXi app enables patients to take the test in their own garden or while taking a walk on site instead of having to go to a clinic.

    It also creates a 12-week exercise plan based on each patient’s own health information – such as weight, underlying health issues, and whether or not they smoke. The app gradually increases the level of training until the patient complies with the NHS recommended five 30-minute sessions per week at the end of three months of treatment.

    Expert judgment: “This could be useful, but we know that most people find it difficult to motivate themselves to exercise unless there is someone around to do it. This is especially true for older people, for whom social interaction is just as important as physical exercise. “

    How to Use Your Phone to Stay Happy and Healthy

    App to deal with leaks

    Squeezy, £ 2.99, Google Play or AppStore

    AN estimates that seven million people in the UK – mostly women – have urinary incontinence. It tends to affect the elderly because the muscles that control bladder function get weaker with age.

    Pelvic floor exercises are known to help fight the problem, but must be done regularly and properly to get any real benefit – something many patients struggle with. The Squeezy app is aimed at both men and women and offers patients a pelvic floor exercise plan developed by physiotherapists who specialize in women’s health.

    Users are given clear instructions on how to perform pelvic floor exercises effectively – to improve bladder control – and a journal feature allows them to record improvements in their condition.

    Expert judgment: “A really helpful app. Half the problem with pelvic floor exercises is that you’re never quite sure you’re tensing the right muscles, but with this app to guide you, the chances are much less. ‘

    How to Use Your Phone to Stay Happy and Healthy

    Manage your heart health

    Activate the self-care app, free of charge on Google Play or in the AppStore

    At least one million people in the UK have atrial fibrillation, which is when an abnormal heartbeat causes blood to build up in the heart’s pumping chambers – which increases the risk of a clot that could cause a stroke.

    The average age of onset is around 75 years. Many of the diagnosed patients rely on the blood-thinning drug warfarin to reduce their risk of stroke. However, the drug must be carefully monitored as too much can lead to life-threatening internal bleeding.

    This means having regular tests at a clinic – usually every four to six weeks – to measure the amount of the drug in the blood.

    The NHS-approved Engage app allows patients to do this at home – without hospitalization – provided they have received a test kit from their GP.

    The app saves readings and wirelessly shares them with the patient’s doctor so that he can remotely monitor drug levels.

    Expert Verdict: “Most patients who take warfarin either need regular checkups or a county nurse calls every few weeks to get a blood sample, but the app could make life a lot easier.”

    Keep track of daily pills

    How to Use Your Phone to Stay Happy and Healthy

    Pillboxie, £ 1.79, AppStore

    Billed as an “easy way to remember your medication”, you can use this app to record every day which tablets you have to take and at what time. But what makes this so user-friendly is that there are visual – and not just text-based – reminders of taking medication.

    For example, if a medication has to be taken at 7 a.m., a tablet appears in the picture of a pill box and remains there until the patient informs the app that they have taken the medication. Separately, the app can flash a list of ‘medication due today’ that the patient can tick off on the go.

    Expert verdict: “Apps like this are a great idea and the visual element will likely make them more user-friendly. I know pharmacists sometimes have to call patients every day to remind them to take their medication. Using this app could prevent patients from accidentally missing doses. “

    Sounds like nodding off

    How to Use Your Phone to Stay Happy and Healthy

    Pzizz, for free on Google Play or AppStore

    Many older people have trouble sleeping. This may be due to a day nap, which reduces nighttime fatigue. The Pzizz app uses a complex mix of music, voice overs, and various background sound effects to create a “dream landscape” described by the creators as a “dream landscape” that promotes sleep.

    Expert judgment: “Sleep problems are very common in older people and they can become afraid of them, which can make falling asleep even more difficult. This app could possibly help. ‘

    Stay mobile to relieve pain

    How to Use Your Phone to Stay Happy and Healthy

    ESCAPE-Pain-App, free of charge on Google Play

    In the case of chronic pain, it is important to stay mobile. The Escape Pain app is for people with pain who want to stay mobile at home instead of attending fitness classes. It includes videos with clear instructions on gentle exercise and allows users to track their progress and track pain.

    Expert verdict: “We know that in diseases like osteoarthritis, which affects around eight million people in the UK, staying mobile is essential to control pain and maintain muscle strength.

    “Apps like this can help patients find the right type and amount of exercise for them.”

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