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Adirondack housing crisis is pricing out local families, workers | News, Sports, Jobs

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The pandemic has boosted second home sales and the short-term vacation rental market is booming, leaving local and seasonal workers few affordable options and forcing some to leave the city.

Rick Kipp and his wife, Samantha Moore, have rented a small blue house in Old Forge for four years. There is an outside grill and a wind chime that hangs from a shady tree. “It’s actually just a small three-bedroom bungalow.” says Kipp.

Kipp, Moore and their three children live here, so it’s on the small side, but they love the location. The kids can walk to school and tip to work. He cleans and maintains city buildings.

At the beginning of May there was a knock on her front door. They were served papers stating that their lease would not be renewed. They had three months to pack.

“We were panic” says Moore. “It was very scary.”

Moore worked as a waitress at Old Forge for years. She is pregnant with her fourth child, who is expected in mid-July. “I’ve called everyone I know all my life and said, ‘Please, if you hear something, please let me know.'”

Moore and Kipp grew up in Old Forge and have lived here their entire lives. Her hope was to find an apartment in Old Forge, to stay and raise her family.

They made an offer for a place in early May. It was out of budget and in disrepair, but Kipp says they were desperate. “They were asking for $ 230,000 and the entire interior had to be remodeled and renewed and the bathroom floor was sagging.”

Nevertheless, their offer was rejected. Kipp says it’s frustrating and sad that people like him, locals who have multiple jobs and raise young children, can’t afford to shop in their own hometown.

“We need more affordable living space here. It’s not even a question “ says Kipp.

“There is no place where anyone can live without extravagant money.”

Real estate and rental markets are booming

From 2016 to 2020, property prices in Old Forge skyrocketed. Even homes that aren’t directly on the water are up 30%, according to local real estate data, and there are fewer homes for sale.

“Real estate is often sold to the first buyer who gets into the car.” says Heather Timm Keen, a real estate agent in Old Forge. “The inventory is lower than ever and I’ve been doing it for twelve years.”

At the same time, the number of short-term rentals, for example from Airbnbs, has skyrocketed. Mike Farmer, the local tourism director, says local prices are falling out of the area, putting the economy at risk.

“Without affordable housing we have no future to offer the workers a decent livelihood” says Bauer.

The local water park, Enchanted Forest Water Safari, built its own staff housing and affordable housing development was also built a few years ago, but Old Forge has a lot more housing demand than supply.

Bruce Misarski says the same goes for Essex County. “We have legitimate people, we have money, but no units that people can buy.” says Misarski.

Misarski is the executive director of Essex County’s Housing Assistance Program. The program helps people cover down payments and closing costs. It also offers rental assistance.

Misarski says the real estate crisis in the Adirondacks is at a turning point. “Churches have to decide what their future is and how they want to react to it” says Misarski.

“We’re trying to help, but it’s really up to the community to decide how to proceed.”

Housing developments in progress, but barely affordable options Some communities are making progress. In Tupper Lake, plans are being made to build a mixed-income residential complex in the old OWD factory. Lake Placid has three housing projects in the works and an apartment building is planned for Saranac Lake, but less than a quarter of these units would be considered affordable in both communities.

In addition, all of these projects are still years away from completion. Meanwhile, guys like Ben Kline in Saranac Lake are trying to bring more units to market. Kline volunteers on the local housing task force and says they are always looking for rehabilitation spots.

“If something is given up, can we get it under control? When it comes to the tax auction, can we get our hands on it to try and create apartments where it doesn’t exist now? “

Kline is a real estate agent in Saranac Lake. Earlier this year, he created a Facebook page to connect potential tenants to affordable housing. One of the common themes on the site is how few places allow dogs or cats.

“This is a challenge because there are already a limited number of units, but there are a much smaller number that allow pets.” says Kline.

Fewer locals, fewer children in schools

This housing crisis comes at a time when the Adirondacks are experiencing another type of crisis – the slow decline in school enrollments.

Saranac Lake’s school district has shrunk by about a third in the past two decades. The town of Webb, which also includes Old Forge, has shrunk 40% to just 250 children in K-12.

The city of Webb loses four more children. After Rick Kipp and Samantha Moore’s offer for the Old Forge house was turned down, they got in the car and drove 30 minutes south to view a house in the town of Forestport.

“It was a very nice house and it was in our price range” says Moore. “We said this would be the last resort. I doubt it has to happen, but in the end it did. “

For the first time in their lives, Moore and her family are leaving Old Forge. They are leaving the same school district they went to as children. You have two children with special needs so she is worried about starting them in a new school.

Moore told the kids that the move might not take forever.

“Maybe one day we can go back to Old Forge, but let’s see how that works.”

“It helps that it’s a really nice house and that there is so much land.” says Moore. “We set up a small trampoline, we set up a small playground at the back”

After their lease ended after they were evicted from their hometown and forced to leave their school district, Moore says they are lucky. They saved up for months on a down payment so they could at least afford to move.

A lot of people in the Adirondacks, Moore says, are far worse.

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Routt County real estate sales total $30M for week of Nov. 19 to 25

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Routt County’s real estate transactions for the week of November 19-25 totaled $ 29,880,606 on 36 sales.

Address: 302 Honeysuckle Drive, Hayden

Sellers: Chris J. and Maria E. Kaminski, Andrea and Jeff Kortas

Buyer: Jan Raoul Bradley

Date: November 19, 2021

Price: $ 57,000

Property description: 0.25 hectares of undeveloped residential land, submission no. 1, lot 9 in Sagewood.

Address: 1805 River Queen Lane

Seller: Pat Moore Trust Deed

Buyers: Erin N. and Justin D. Moomey

Date: November 19, 2021

Price: $ 490,000

Description: 834 square foot two bedroom, two bath condo, Unit 206 in the Ridge Crest Condo. Last sold for $ 285,000 in 2006.

Address: 2810 Trails Edge

Seller: Betsy Ludlow Living Trust and Richard Ludlow Living Trust

Buyers: Thomas A. Walker and Angela D. Walker Joint Revocable Trust

Date: November 19, 2021

Price: $ 3,100,000

Description: 3,696 square foot five bedroom, four bath townhouse on 0.078 acres, Lot 2 at Viking Lodge. Last sold in 2011 for $ 1,475,000.

Address: 25150 Whitewood Drive West

Seller: John T. Strickland Revocable Trust

Buyers: Harriet Reisman Snyder and Richard Snyder

Date: November 19, 2021

Price: $ 1,142,250

Description: 3,124 square foot three bedroom, two bath single family home on 8.41 acres, Lot 34 in the Whitewood Subdivision – Aspen Highlands Filing. Last sold in 1997 for $ 250,000.

Address: No address, Hayden

Seller: Hayden Industrial Park LLC

Buyer: Concobar III LLC

Date: November 19, 2021

Price: $ 467,527

Description: Lots 21, 22, 32, 33, 49 in the Valley View Business Park Final Replat, Lot 45R in the Replat Minor Subdivision.

Address: 442 Enterprise St., Hayden

Vendors: Dylan R. and Kaylee Richardson

Buyer: Concobar III LLC

Date: November 19, 2021

Price: $ 74,900

Description: 0.434 acres of undeveloped commercial land, Lot 40 in the Valley View Business Park. Last sold for $ 29,000 in 2018.

Address: 432 Enterprise St., Hayden

Seller: James M. Mannon

Buyer: Neil Montgomery

Date: November 19, 2021

Price: $ 53,500

Property description: 0.377 hectare free commercial property, Lot 41 in the Valley View Business Park.

Address: 3345 Columbine Drive

Vendors: Lynn and Ronald P. Miles, Lynn Shattock-Miles

Buyers: Justin R. and Lois A. Mueller

Date: November 19, 2021

Price: $ 665,000

Description: 974 square foot two bedroom, two bath condominium, Unit 806 in Sunray Meadows Condominiums Phase IV. Last sold for $ 220,000 in 2011.

Address: 2505 Daybreak Court

Seller: Robert Anthony Gill

Buyers: Cynthia M. and Edward J. Orlandi

Date: November 22, 2021

Price: $ 750,000

Description: 1,302 square foot two bedroom, two bath condo, Unit 306, Building 300 in Sunrise Condo. Last sold for $ 144,280 in 1980.

Address: 3355 Columbine Drive

Vendors: Brian L. and Kay Lynn Benzinger

Buyer: Marsha A. Erickson

Date: November 22, 2021

Price: $ 749,500

Description: 1,117 square foot three bedroom, two bath condo, Unit 603 in Sunray Meadows Condominiums Phase III. Last sold for $ 355,000 in 2006.

Address: 31135 Broken Talon Trail

Seller: Allison Mauldin

Buyer: Stewart W. Olive II Non-GST Trust

Date: November 22, 2021

Price: $ 710,000

Description: 3,150 square foot, four bedroom, three bath single family home on 0.97 acres, Lot 51 at Eagles Watch at Stagecoach. Last sold for $ 335,000 in 2017.

Address: 442 Commerce St., Hayden

Seller: Hayden Industrial Park LLC

Buyers: John D. Merrill and Nan Porter

Date: November 22, 2021

Price: $ 52,000

Property description: 0.274 hectares of undeveloped industrial land, Lot 23 in the Valley View Business Park.

Address: 22647 Commanche Road

Seller: K1 Labs LLC

Buyers: Luis Lorenzo and David Twitchell

Date: November 22, 2021

Price: $ 11,985

Property description: 0.62 hectares of undeveloped residential land, Lot 63 at Morningside I at Stagecoach. Last sold for $ 4,500 in 2021.

Address: 1169 Hilltop Parkway

Seller: FCP Steamboat LLC, Triple D Development LLC

Buyer: 202A LLC

Date: November 22, 2021

Price: $ 515,000

Description: 1,667 square foot commercial condominium, Unit 202A in Fox Creek Park Condominiums.

Address: 50320 Semotan Drive

Seller: Diane Anderson Trust Deed

Buyer: DJH Investment Group LLC

Date: November 22, 2021

Price: $ 1,000,000

Description: 2,016 square foot three bedroom, two bath single family home on 42.59 acres of land, SEC 13-8-86. Last sold for $ 580,000 in 2005.

Address: 37160 William William Road

Seller: KGC Real Estate LTD

Buyers: Melissa J. Lyon and Matthew R. Ward

Date: November 23, 2021

Price: $ 2,900,000

Description: 4,905 square foot three bedroom, 3 1/2 bath single family home on 0.86 acres of land, file number 1, lot 105 in the tree house subdivision. Last sold in 2008 for $ 2,200,000.

Address: 41750 Snowy River Place

Seller: SF Marabou LLC, SF Operations LLC

Buyer: Clayton Family Trust

Date: November 23, 2021

Price: $ 1,600,000

Description: 5.17 hectares of arable land, Filing No. 1 in Marabou, Homestead A8.

Address: 1555 Shadow Run Court

Sellers: Dan C. and Sharon S. Densmore

Buyer: Joseph A. Danni

Date: November 23, 2021

Price: $ 500,000

Description: 841 square foot two bedroom, two bath condo, Unit 309, Building D in Shadow Run Condo. Last sold for $ 100,000 in 2000.

Address: 871 Dry Creek South Road, Hayden

Seller: Tharles Bruno Moreira Da Silva

Buyer: SSIRE LLC

Date: November 23, 2021

Price: $ 590,000

Description: 2,414 square foot, four bedroom, three bath single family home on 0.19 acres, Filing # 1, Block 2, Lot 1 in Dry Creek Village Subdivision. Last sold for $ 515,000 in 2020.

Address: 314 Parkview Drive

Seller: Steven A. Dawes

Buyers: Denise C. Anderson and David Grigsby

Date: November 23, 2021

Price: $ 975,000

Description: 1,942 square foot three bedroom, 2 1/2 bath townhouse on 0.038 acres of land, File Number 3, Unit 31 in Longview Park. Last sold for $ 577,000 in 2016.

Address: 2315 Storm Meadows Drive

Seller: Melissa N. Blank Living Trust

Buyer: Nicholas Schoeder

Date: November 23, 2021

Price: $ 1,710,000

Description: 2,193-square-foot, three-bedroom, three-bath apartment, Kitzbuhel 3 at Trails at Storm Meadows Phase II. Last sold in 2019 for $ 900,000.

Address: Handelsstrasse, Hayden

Seller: Hayden Industrial Park LLC

Buyers: Christopher Wirtz Callahan and William D. Wernig

Date: November 23, 2021

Price: $ 259,000

Description: Vacant commercial lot, lots 45-48 in Valley View Business Park Final Replat.

Address: No address

Seller: Annabeth Light Lockhart Revocable Trust

Buyer: Tyrone R. Lockhart

Date: November 23, 2021

Price: $ 29,221.50

Description: 4.9 acres of agricultural land, Lot 6 at Pirates Hideout Subdivision, SEC 3-9-86.

Address: No address

Seller: Exemption Equivalent Trust

Buyer: Tyrone R. Lockhart

Date: November 23, 2021

Price: $ 29,221.50

Description: 4.9 acres of agricultural land, Lot 6 at Pirates Hideout Subdivision, SEC 3-9-86.

Address: 20690 Cinch Trail

Seller: Katarina Wright Trust

Buyers: Natascha S. and Stephen W. Hess

Date: November 24, 2021

Price: $ 785,000

Description: 2,490 square foot three bedroom, 2 1/2 bath single family home on 2.1 acres of land, Lot 84 at Sky Hitch at Stagecoach.

Address: 3377 Covey Circle

Sellers: Alexandra C. and James W. MacDougall II, Joseph M. Press

Buyers: Lynn Baumgardner and Robert Starland Mullins

Date: November 24, 2021

Price: $ 885,000

Description: 1,563 square foot three bedroom, three bath condominium, Unit 1501, Building 15 on Quail Run Condominium Phase V. Last sold in 2018 for $ 535,000.

Address: 1252 Urban Way

Seller: CP Ventures LLC

Buyer: Adrian Neuhauser

Date: November 24, 2021

Price: $ 1,450,000

Description: Lot B, Unit 2 on Urban Street at the Mountain.

Address: 967 Captain Jack Drive

Sellers: George Clinton and Randi Cariella Owens

Buyer: Dylan John Erhart

Date: November 24, 2021

Price: $ 996,000

Description: 1,424 square foot three bedroom, two bath single family home on 0.35 acres, Lot 5 at Captain Jack West Subdivision. Last sold for $ 676,837 in 2019.

Address: 262 Harvest Drive, Hayden

Seller: Lisetta M. Ketchell

Buyer: Steamboat Realty Partners LLC

Date: November 24, 2021

Price: $ 297,500

Description: 1,578 square foot three bedroom, two bath townhouse on 0.022 acres, Lot 62 at Westwind Townhomes. Last sold for $ 200,000 in 2020.

Address: 1683 Thistlebrook Lane

Vendors: Chris Kennedy and Emma Russell

Buyers: Craig J. and Sandra Jacoby

Date: November 24, 2021

Price: $ 1,450,000

Description: 2,033 square foot three bedroom, 3 1/2 bath townhouse on 0.042 acres, Filing No. 3, Lot 1683 at Foxwillow Townhomes. Last sold for $ 519,000 in 2014.

Address: 747 Sandhill Circle

Sellers: Jessica Amend and Jeffrey O. Black

Buyers: Jessica and Kevin Olsen

Date: November 24, 2021

Price: $ 2,065,000

Description: 3,324 square foot four bedroom, 3 1/2 bath single family home on 0.31 acres of land, Lot 23 in the Emerald Knoll-Peddie Subdivision, Amended Final Plat. Last sold for $ 1,067,500 in 2018.

Address: 1145 Overlook Drive

Seller: Alice Ann Rogers

Buyer: Michael and Jeanette Sawa Revocable Trust

Date: November 24, 2021

Price: $ 839,000

Description: 2,864 square foot four bedroom, 3 1/2 bath townhouse, Lot C-1, Building C in Columbine Townhomes. Last sold for $ 540,000 in 2019.

Address: 33895 Willow Lane

Seller: Janet M. Behnke

Buyers: Anna and Stefan Sladek

Date: November 24, 2021

Price: $ 1,162,000

Description: 1,724 square foot three bedroom, two bath single family home on 2.07 acres, Lot 9 on Willow Park Subdivision.

Address: 29050 Yowell Lane, 31800 Routt County Road 14B

Vendors: Usha Ramadhyani and Warren Bourgeois III

Buyer: PDL One LLC

Date: November 24, 2021

Price: $ 1,050,000

Description: 37.89 hectares of arable land, Lot 25 at Lake Catamount Subdivision Exemption. Last sold for $ 750,000 in 2019.

Total: $ 29,410,606

Timeshare

Address: 2300 Mount Werner Circle

Seller: Donna C. Barker Revocable Trust Agreement, Donna C. Barker

Buyers: Peter R. and Rayna L. Hale

Date: November 19, 2021

Price: $ 95,000

Accommodation Description: 1/4 interest in and to a 797 square foot one bedroom, two bath condo, Unit 256 in the Steamboat Grand Resort Hotel Condo. Last sold for $ 41,000 in 2013.

Address: 2250 Apres Ski Way

Seller: Pyrite LLC

Buyer: Bighorn Holdings LLC

Date: November 24, 2021

Price: $ 375,000

Property description: 1/8 interest in and to a 2,508 square meter apartment with four bedrooms and four bathrooms, unit RC-406 in the OSP Condomnium on Apres Ski Way.

Total: $ 470,000

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Waterfront home prices in Seattle up 50% or more in 2 years. Here’s why

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King County, home to some of Washington’s most sought-after and expensive waterfront properties, has long had top prices for homes on the water.

But this has been confirmed dramatically over the past two years, as average waterfront home sales prices rose steadily across the county from January 2019 to March this year, according to a report from Sotheby’s Realogics.

The rise in prices is noticeable because, for the most part, waterfront properties in King County have never been cheap. With typical economic changes, the undervalued areas are the ones that show the most noticeable appreciation in the shortest amount of time, but that is not the case in King County.

The table below, created by Chris Murphy of Compass Real Estate on the Washington Waterfronts blog, shows that sales prices skyrocketed from late 2016 through the first quarter of 2021.

2016: $ 855,000
2017: $ 1,090,000
2018: $ 1,000,000
2019: $ 1,227.50
2020: $ 1,249,888
2021, Q1: $ 1,247,250

Chris Murphy of Compass and WashingtonWaterfronts.com compiled this stunning data set showing the rising prices of waterfront real estate in Washington.

Seattle MLS via Coldwell Baker Bain and Data Table via Chris Murphy, Compass, Washington Waterfronts.com

Who are the buyers for these overpriced homes?

Corey Patt, real estate agent for Coldwell Banker Bain in Seattle, told SeattlePI, “When it comes to why water ratings are rising so fast, I don’t think it’s so much who? does the buying, but ‘why?’ The “who” is the usual suspect: mostly local tech and other business leaders with some foreign investment.

Why are waterfront houses so popular?

What is more interesting is why such properties are enjoying this incredible increase in sales prices. Sotheby’s Realogics reported that waterfront home sales in popular markets “have increased more than 50% to date” in 2021, although inventories “are down 60%”.

Undoubtedly, persistently low inventory levels, stock market trends, and historically low interest rates are all factors driving this market. But the wild card, the card that no one in the industry has ever looked at, is the COVID pandemic.

“I would say that the main reason we have seen an exceptional surge in waterfront and property valuations across the board is because of what I call the ‘COVID bump,'” said Patt.

“The pandemic has caused a gigantic change in the way people think. They have re-evaluated the work and life relationship and their wishes and needs from home and, in my memory, created a real estate market like no other … and I’ve been doing that for over 30 years. “

Below are four of the most expensive waterfront home sales this year, from the King County MLS courtesy of Kelly Zuger of Coldwell Banker Bain. Two of these sales were lightning-fast while two took longer – but all four have one thing in common: These are some of the highest waterfront property prices King County has ever seen.

Although the address isn't listed, this waterfront home in Madrona Park, MLS # 1839463, sold for $ 30.750 million after just 7 days in the market. Seattle MLS via Coldwell Baker Bain and Data Table via Chris Murphy, Compass, Washington Waterfronts.com

Although the address isn’t listed, this waterfront home in Madrona Park, MLS # 1839463, sold for $ 30.750 million after just 7 days in the market.

This Hunt's Point whereabouts, also an unlisted address for MLS # 1795337, sold for $ 23.5 million after 74 days on the market. Seattle MLS via Coldwell Baker Bain and Data Table via Chris Murphy, Compass, Washington Waterfronts.com

This Hunt’s Point whereabouts, also an unlisted address for MLS # 1795337, sold for $ 23.5 million after 74 days on the market.

That house on 100th Ave.  SE 2011 in Bellevue, MLS # 1810224, sold for $ 22.750 million after 8 days on the market. Seattle MLS via Coldwell Baker Bain and Data Table via Chris Murphy, Compass, Washington Waterfronts.com

That house on 100th Ave. SE 2011 in Bellevue, MLS # 1810224, sold for $ 22.750 million after 8 days on the market.

This home in Medina sold for $ 20 million and traded under the name MLS # 1681602 after a 306 day stay this year.Seattle MLS via Coldwell Baker Bain and Data Table via Chris Murphy, Compass, Washington Waterfronts.com

This home in Medina sold for $ 20 million and traded under the name MLS # 1681602 after a 306 day stay this year.

Anna Marie Erwert writes from both a tenant and a new buyer perspective and has (finally) achieved both statuses. She focuses on national property trends and specializes in the San Francisco Bay Area and the Pacific Northwest. Follow Anna on Twitter: @AnnaMarieErwert.

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How Austin Became One of the Least Affordable Cities in America

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AUSTIN – In the past few years, one of America’s fastest growing cities has seen change in the Texas capital at a feverish pace, with churches torn down, RV parks razed, and neighborhood hangouts replaced with trendy restaurants and luxury apartment complexes.

The transformation is perhaps most felt in East Austin and the Montopolis neighborhood, a 2.5 square kilometer patch southeast of downtown where unobstructed views of the ever-expanding skyline have made the historically grown Black and Latino neighborhood a coveted community.

And the dynamics are still a long way off. Nowadays, construction sites and cranes all over the neighborhood feel more like a permanent fixture, where longtime residents have watched with growing fear as chic cafes, yoga studios, and expensive bars drew closer.

“We knew it was coming,” said Francisco Nuñez, who lived in Cactus Rose Mobile Home Park for nearly two decades until it was sold to a developer to make room for plush housing that is now more than double that the price paid once in the rental price.

A decade ago, Austin, the capital of Texas, often considered a liberal oasis in a decidedly conservative state, was one of the cheapest places to live. The Austin metropolitan area is well on its way to becoming the least affordable large metropolitan area for homebuyers outside of California by the end of the year, according to a forecast from Zillow, an affordable real estate company. It has already outperformed hot markets in Boston, Miami, and New York City.

With an average of 180 new residents moving to the city every day in 2020, the housing stock is very low, brokers said. Multiple offers, bidding battles and block-long queues in front of the open houses are the order of the day.

Home sales prices in the city of Austin rose to a record median of $ 536,000 in October, down from about $ 441,250 a year ago. And they have more than doubled since 2011, when the average retail price was $ 216,000, according to the Austin Board of REALTORS, a trading group. Rents have also increased, with the average cost of an 864-square-foot apartment now being $ 1,600.

“Austin is the worst-kept secret,” said Job Hammond, a secretary-treasurer on the board.

With the University of Texas flagship campus, rolling hillsides, and a vibrant music scene, Austin has long been an attractive home. But soaring prices have created a brewing housing crisis that is reshaping the city of nearly 1 million people, displacing mostly low-income blacks and Latinos like Mr. Nuñez from cultural centers, transportation hubs, grocery stores, and other amenities that come with it, activists said.

The lack of affordable housing was underscored by the relentless sight of homeless camps outside town hall and under busy highways. (The city recently began evicting them after voters approved a public camping ban this year.)

In 2018, at least 35 Austin neighborhoods saw some gentrification, even though they were already experiencing explosive growth. Another 23 neighborhoods were at high risk of following suit, according to a city-commissioned study conducted by researchers from the University of Texas.

The numbers are likely higher today, said Heather K. Way, a law professor at the university and one of the study’s authors.

“One day you are driving down a street and suddenly you think, ‘What happened to that apartment building that was there last week?'” Ms. Way said, referring to the rapid demolition of older apartment buildings in some Austin. Neighborhoods.

The eviction of low-income residents in a city roughly 13 percent below the poverty line worried Austin officials so much that a grassroots movement prompted them to hire the city’s first evictions officer this year. Nefertitti Jackmon’s task is to prevent widespread gentrification, even as cranes populate the skyline more and more and new buildings climb higher and higher.

Ms. Jackmon said that, while plans stay afoot, her office will be allocated approximately $ 300 million over the next 13 years to help tackle evictions such as B. for more affordable housing in the affected neighborhoods. She doesn’t mince her words when describing the challenges that lie ahead.

“In Austin, black and brown neighborhoods have been marginalized and underinvested,” said Ms. Jackmon. She also said she wanted to increase local residents’ participation in the early process of new developments. “We say that development can happen without displacement.”

But not everyone is convinced that a new evacuation agency will have a significant impact.

“It’s an aspirin for cancer,” said Fred McGhee, a local historian and longtime resident of Montopolis, a neighborhood that once housed enslaved people and Mexican migrants who worked in cotton fields.

On a new day, Dr. McGhee his house, pointing in different directions, on construction sites or newly built luxury buildings. “Not so long ago these were all wetlands,” said Mr. McGhee. “Now all you see is new developments or plans for one.”

East Vue Ranch is one of them. On what was once the Cactus Rose Mobile Home Park, the luxury complex has an elegant swimming pool, game room and an enclosed dog park. There is now another country apartment complex nearby that was once occupied by a historic Black Church. Another Black Church, built in the 1860s, was demolished to make way for a street that could accommodate all of the new traffic. And a neighborhood hair salon has been replaced by a trendy South American bakery.

“This has become the story of two Austins,” said Susana Almanza, a longtime activist. “The rich continue to build in our neighborhoods and the poor are constantly being displaced. It doesn’t end. “

From March 2020 to February 2021, despite the pandemic, Austin nearly led the nation in new construction with nearly 42,000 new homes, according to a housing report from Rice University’s Children’s Institute for Urban Research.

Much of the city’s expansion has been attributed to the recent arrival of tech titans including Apple, Amazon, IBM, and AT&T – and more recently Tesla, whose CEO Elon Musk, who already lives with a missile site in South Texas, said the Das Company would move its headquarters from Palo Alto, California to Austin.

Those big strides – the merger with other big tech companies like Dell and IBM that are already well-established in the region – have brought in a younger and more affluent population, giving the city the new nickname “Silicon Hills”.

The high paying jobs have accelerated the region’s economy. Over the past 10 years, high-tech jobs, which tend to be paid in the six-digit range, in the Austin metropolitan area rose by almost 62 percent to a total of around 176,000 jobs, which is 17 percent of all jobs and well above the growth of any other Industries, according to the Austin Chamber of Commerce.

And since 2010, the median household income has risen from $ 55,744 to $ 80,954, according to the chamber.

Those high salaries have driven house prices, including rents, up, the cost of which has increased 38 percent over the past decade, more than in other fast-growing Texas cities like Dallas and San Antonio, according to a housing market analysis by Root Policy Research from 2020.

The city, which has had nearly 160,000 residents in the past 10 years, “can’t build houses fast enough,” said Rob Gordon, manager and real estate agent for real estate company JBGoodwin.

In the Northwest Hills neighborhood, about 20 minutes northwest of downtown, where Mr. Gordon does most of his business, 18 of the 19 homes in the market were sold above asking price this spring, an average of 113 percent, Mr. Gordon said . A home priced at $ 975,000 sold for $ 1,395,000 after a grueling bidding war.

Jon Kniss, a Nashville photographer, was taking desperate efforts to find a home when he moved to Austin last year. For months he covered his new neighborhood with letters with offers of money.

Nine months and more than 200 letters later, the Kniss family moved to a three-bedroom house in an affluent community northwest of downtown. “We wanted to see if we could get a little advantage,” said Mr. Kniss. “Great weather, quality of life, the schools. Everyone wants to move here. “

That feels especially good in Montopolis.

For those who have left the neighborhood, many wonder if they will be forced to leave their new homes again as new developments continue to be approved and built in even more remote corners of the city.

Maria Garcia de la Luz, 68, a former Cactus Rose resident who now lives next to Mr Nuñez, said she missed the proximity to shops and access to public transportation that she had in Montopolis. Not so long ago she injured a knee in an accident and was unable to receive treatment after her husband Magdaleno Garcia, 77, also fell ill and could not drive.

“It really touched me. I feel trapped here, ”said Ms. de la Luz. “In the end, it’s us, the poor people, who get hurt in the end. Who says they won’t throw us out of here too? “

Susan C. Beachy contributed to the research.

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