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WWII veteran, NAS Pensacola employee reflects on service, country

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Growing up in Pensacola, Lloyd Moon served well when he was in the US Navy boot camp during World War II.

A group of new sailors took a swim test, and many of them were from the northern states and had never learned to swim. The instructors had long sticks to assist the swimmers when they started fighting.

“I just went over to the end and rushed in and before I could get up there were two or three guys nudging and nudging me,” Moon said. “So I swam out there to the edge of the pool and came back and they stood there with their mouths open. The chief, a chief in charge of us, came out and said, ‘Moon, where in the’ world are you from? ‘ I said “Pensacola, Florida”. And he said, ‘Oh, that explains it.’ “

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Just before the Independence Day holidays, Moon, now 98, reflected on his country’s three years serving in the Navy during World War II and decades of civilian aircraft clerk at NAS Pensacola.

He said Pensacola’s strong military presence did not necessarily affect his decision to join the Navy. Instead, it was just a sense of duty when the war broke out. During holidays like July 4th, Moon said he hoped people would remember what military personnel have done for the country.

“I really hope you remember everything,” he said. “I think future generations should hold onto that forever. That is the great importance of this country. … It is important because they have to know where they come from. The people just need more respect and honor for their country.”

Service to the navy and land has become a family tradition with Moon’s father working at the base and one of his daughters now too.

“The coolest thing for me is that so many men I’ve worked with knew my daddy. And everyone said how much they liked him, what a great guy he was, what a straight shooter he was, ”said Lloyd’s daughter Lisa Moon Lisa. “For me it was a family thing and I enjoyed it. And it was fun because I actually worked on a couple of airline lines and repaired some of the same types of aircraft that he was dealing with.”

Moon moved to Pensacola when she was only 2 years old and has lived in the area since then, except for his time in the military. His father had health problems and was ordered to move south from Indianapolis, Indiana, where Moon was born, in hopes the warm climate might help.

After Moon graduated from Tate High School, just days before the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, Moon was hired for his first job at NAS Pensacola. He hoped to join the Navy as a service member soon after, but it took him about a year to get a release to quit a government job and report officially.

“We were at war. I was 19 years old. I just think it’s time to go,” he said.

World War II veteran Lloyd Moon, 98, holds a shadow box with some of his Navy memorabilia at his Pensacola home on Friday.

When drafted, he was a radar man aboard the USS Carlson, which escorted convoys and supply ships as well as conducted submarine patrols in the Pacific. He said other seafarers were very patriotic at the time.

“They really loved their home because they were all happy people. I’ve never heard a guy complain about being there, you know? ”Said Moon.

Moon’s military career began with a bang after he left Boston on the maiden voyage of his ship. He soon helped spot an enemy submarine.

The crew were credited with a “probable kill” of a submarine after an airplane dispatched the next morning discovered an oil slick in the water that was a mile wide and a mile and a half long.

“We had three pretty big guns,” said Moon. “We started getting closer to the sub and (the officer) fired a star grenade and lit the entire area and all we saw was (sub tower) going down.”

Moon, whose brother Glenn also served in the Navy aboard the USS Louisville, ended his naval career when his ship was near Tokyo Bay on September 2, 1945 when the war officially ended.

World War II veteran Lloyd Moon, 98, holds his naval uniform at his Pensacola home on Friday.

Moon said he was offered a promotion to continue his naval career and take another radar course at Peal Harbor, but he chose to go to Pensacola instead.

A few weeks later he got his old job back as an aerospace metal smith at NAS Pensacola, where he would work for the next three decades until he retired in January 1979.

“I always remember people in the community saying if you get out in the Navy Yard, it’s a good, stable paycheck and the perks are great. And I’ve never worked there before, but I’m sure that the camaraderie of all these people was “probably cool because a lot of them ended up in the military and then you all came back so you’re all doubly connected because you were at war,” said Moon’s daughter Denise Tucker.

Moon worked in a variety of roles, such as a craftsman in the engineering department and workshop manager that brought him to the Philippines to work on aircraft damaged in the Vietnam War.

Much of his family life was also centered on the grassroots. Moon’s wife, Hazel Moon, owned a successful men’s clothing store on the Gulf Beach Highway called the Shirt Shop. Many of the customers there were military personnel from the base.

The family also lived in an area called Beach Haven near Navy Point. Their home was on the water, directly across from the base, which resulted in regular interactions with the children.

“We literally had white sand down there and Sunday afternoons, all kinds of people were driving down there and we just sat there all day and watched the Blue Angels practice. It was just a second (nature) to us,” Tucker said.

Madison Arnold can be reached at marnold@pnj.com and 850-435-8522.

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Men’s Health

The healthy habits that men who want to be dads should adopt

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It’s no surprise that most fertility studies are looking at what women need to do to improve their chances of having a healthy baby, and while most of us know better, new research has found that the majority of women are still drinking and drinking Consumed caffeine when trying to get pregnant.

But it takes two to have a baby – and what men do trying to be fathers is also crucial in finding parenthood.

The new study by Tommy’s pregnancy charity found that more than half of women drank alcohol and four-fifths consumed caffeine while planning pregnancy. Another in five women smoked and one in 25 used drugs, with even higher rates among those under 25.

The study did not look at male fertility, but Tommy emphasizes that a healthy lifestyle is very important for men who want to be a father, as it affects the quality of their sperm and therefore the chances of conception and future health can of your baby.

“Much attention is paid to how maternal health and well-being can affect baby development, but when a couple is planning a pregnancy it is important that fathers are healthy too – not just for their own fertility. but for the long-term future of their family, as the health of the parents when they become pregnant can affect their children’s DNA, ”explains Tommy’s midwife Sophie King.

“Small changes can really make a big difference to the long-term health of parents and babies,” she adds.

And Dr. Raj Mathur, Chairman of the British Fertility Society, emphasizes: “We know from research that the lifestyle of the potential father is also very important for the chances of pregnancy and the outcome of the pregnancy.

“Men planning a baby with their partner should take the opportunity to improve their health and lifestyle, including factors such as weight, moderate regular exercise, smoking cessation, reducing alcohol consumption, and following a healthy, balanced diet.”

So what do men who want to become fathers have to do to improve their chances?

Cut down on alcohol

Alcohol can affect both male and female fertility, and Tommy says too much alcohol can lead to poor sperm quality and quantity, as well as decreased testosterone levels and even a loss of interest in sex.

Men trying to have a baby are advised to reduce their alcohol consumption and not drink more than the recommended maximum limit of 14 units per week, and evenly spread their drinking over three days or more.

Cut down on caffeine

There is evidence that men who consume too much caffeine when trying to get pregnant can increase their partner’s risk of miscarriage.

The same goes for women, so Tommy suggests that couples struggling to have a baby should limit their caffeine intake to 200 mg per day (around two cups of instant coffee or one cup of filter coffee).

Do not smoke

Smoking can lower the quality of a man’s sperm, resulting in lower sperm counts and affecting the ability of the sperm to swim. It’s even linked to sexual impotence (inability to get or maintain an erection), explains Tommy.

Also, a woman who inhales cigarette smoke through secondhand smoke can affect her ability to get pregnant – and just opening windows and doors won’t help, the charity points out.

Keep your testicles cool

The NHS says a man’s testicles need to be slightly cooler than the rest of his body to produce the best quality sperm. That sounds harsh, but there are a few simple things you can do to stay cooler down there, such as wearing loose-fitting underwear like boxer shorts and, if you’re working in a hot environment, taking regular breaks outdoors. Also, if you sit at a desk for long periods of time, try to get up and move around regularly.

King also advises: “Men who are having babies should avoid saunas and hot baths and shouldn’t sit still for long periods or have a warm laptop on their lap.”

Maintain a healthy weight

While the new Tommy research found that more than half of women who tried to conceive may report their weight had a high BMI, which can decrease the chances of conceiving and increase the risk of pregnancy complications Men who are overweight or obese can also negatively impact fertility as it can affect the quality and quantity of their sperm, Tommy’s says.

Eat healthy

If your partner is trying to stay healthy to support the pregnancy, why not join her? And make sure you eat your five servings of fruits and vegetables every day, as research by Tommy shows that sperm quality is affected by diet. In addition, it might be worthwhile to eat a serving of walnuts every day, as they have been shown to support the mobility of the sperm (ability to swim).

“Sperm health can be improved with a balanced diet and regular exercise,” emphasizes King. “Eating fruits, vegetables, whole grains, fish and walnuts has been shown to improve male fertility; red and processed meat, caffeine, saturated fat, and trans fats can all cause problems. “

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Is Winning a Silver or Bronze Medal Really Not Worth Celebrating?

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What is a medal really worth? That question was debated all week after former morning TV presenter and journalist Piers Morgan wrote on Twitter: “Real sports champions don’t celebrate third place” and “If you don’t win gold, you’ve lost. I’m sorry (not sorry) if that simple cold hard fact hurts everyone’s tender little feelings. “

We’ve all seen footballers remove runners-up medals after they were wrapped around their necks and even in Tokyo 2020 we saw athletes like Team GB’s Bradly Sinden can’t hide their disappointment with the win. just ‘a silver medal. So is Morgan right? Are silver and bronze medals really not worth as much as a gold plated medal? And is the saying “second place is the first loser” really true?

Not according to former Olympic swimmer Keri-anne Payne, who spoke exclusively to Men’s Health UK about her own silver medal triumph at the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing. At the time, Payne came eighth in her event, the 10K Open Water Final, but still managed to get away with a silver medal.

“I was so happy,” Payne told Men’s Health UK. “It was like a moment of confirmation that I was good at it and that all the training and sacrifices I had made were worth it.

“I think almost everyone dreams of winning an Olympic medal, but thinking about the color or even getting one beforehand is a recipe for stress and pressure,” she adds. “It’s about focusing on the performance you’ve been training for, not the medal you could win.”

Payne isn’t the only athlete who disagrees with Morgan’s hot take. Canadian figure skater Meaghan Duhamel wrote in response to him: “I’m pretty comfortable with my bronze medal, thank you very much. ‘Winning’ means different things to different people,” said the London 2012 Olympic soccer player and current head coach of the San Diego NWSL Team, Casey Stoney, wrote, “Why do people give Piers Morgan airtime. He has no idea what it takes to be a top athlete.”

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To be fair, it’s important to say that not all athletes agree with Payne, Duhamel, and Stoney. Morgan himself cited a Telegraph article by James Cracknell in which the two-time Olympic gold rower wrote: “All of a sudden, a bronze or silver won’t get you on the front page of a newspaper, the BBC’s leading sports bulletin, or add to it commercial support – it may sound brutal, but gold is the only currency that matters now. ”

Keri Anne Payne celebrates winning the gold medal in the Women’s Open Water 10km during the FINA World Championships in Shanghai, China

Quinn RooneyGetty Images

Payne would certainly disagree, and interestingly enough, the scientific research that says value is not derived from the medal that a person achieves, but from how that person subjectively views their performance.

In 1995 the psychologists Victoria Medvec and Thomas Gilovich from Cornell University and Scott Madey from the University of Toledo carried out an analysis of the emotional reactions of athletes to winning bronze and silver medals at the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona. The researchers observed the reactions of medalists both at the end of their events and when their medals were awarded, and found that bronze medalists tended to be happier than silver medalists.

The authors attribute this to the fact that while silver medalists were still upset about not winning gold, bronze medalists were more likely to leave the Games without a medal than with gold, so they were happy with what they got.

So are bronze and silver medals worth less than gold? Not if science is to be believed, and as Payne says, the value of medals in the Olympics, regardless of color, is not just a personal achievement either.

“I didn’t compete in the Olympics to win everyone on social media,” says Payne. “I was there for myself and I’m incredibly proud of my accomplishments and the legacy that this medal, along with my teammate Cassie Patten with her bronze medal, created for the sport in the UK.

“That’s one of the things the Olympics are about to inspire a nation.”


Daniel Davies is a writer for Men’s Health UK and has been reporting for various publications on sports science, fitness and culture for the past five years.

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Tokyo Olympics: Simone Biles Withdraws From Tokyo Olympics All-Around Gymnastics

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US superstar Simone Biles withdrew from a second gymnastics competition at the Tokyo Olympics on Wednesday to protect her mental health, raising serious doubts about her participation in the rest of the Games. One day after her shocking departure from the team event, USA Gymnastics said the 24-year-old had also withdrawn from the individual all-around event at the Ariake Gymnastics Center. The American hit Japan as one of the headlines for the 2020 Games postponed by the pandemic and had immense expectations as she pursued a record of nine Olympic titles in her career.

But she retired from team competition after a shaky opening jump, and her troubles mean she may not be able to add the four gold medals she won at the 2016 Rio Games.

“After another medical examination, Simone Biles withdrew from the last individual all-around event at the Tokyo Olympics to focus on her mental health,” said a statement from USA Gymnastics.

The US federation said a decision on whether Biles, who will be replaced by Jade Carey, will take part in individual finals will be made after the daily evaluation.

“We support Simone’s decision wholeheartedly and welcome her courage to put her well-being in the foreground,” the statement said. “Her courage shows once again why she is a role model for so many.”

After leaving the team event on Tuesday, where she won silver by starting the finals, Biles said she had to “do the right thing for me and focus on my mental health.”

“I don’t trust myself as much as I used to, and I don’t know if it’s age,” she said. “I’m a little more nervous when doing gymnastics.”

Support for the gymnast poured in from around the world after her withdrawal from the team finals.

Michelle Obama tweeted, “Am I good enough? Yes I am. The mantra that I practice every day. @Simone_Biles, we are proud of you and we cheer you on. Congratulations on the silver medal, Team @USA! “

Filipino boxing legend Manny Pacquiao tweeted, “Once a champion, always a champion. God Bless @Simone_Biles. “

Home fans are still coming to terms with the defeat of Japanese tennis star Naomi Osaka on Tuesday, who contested her first event since retiring from the French Open, citing mental health problems.

Ledecky strikes back

Biles’ problems overshadowed the sporting program on Wednesday’s fifth day of action.

Katie Ledecky, who won four gold medals at the 2016 Rio Games, lost her 200m freestyle crown to Ariarne Titmus two days after she also surrendered her 400m title to the Australian.

But they regrouped to crush the field in the women’s first 1,500-meter run at the Olympics, finishing more than four seconds ahead of U.S. teammate Erica Sullivan.

Ledecky, 24, is the fourth swimmer to win six Olympic gold medals, including her first 800m freestyle victory at the 2012 London Games.

Titmus, nicknamed “Terminator,” emerged as one of the stars at the Tokyo Aquatics Center when Australia shot up the medal table.

The 20-year-old, who achieved a new Olympic record time of 1min 53.50sec, still has the 800m freestyle and the 4x200m relay ahead of him in a grueling program.

The Japanese Yui Ohashi completed a double medley and won the 200m race before the 400m gold, which she secured on Sunday, while world record holder Kristof Milak won the men’s 200m butterfly gold.

The British freestyle swimmers brought the morning session to an exciting climax, narrowly missing out on the world record in the 4×200 meter freestyle by beating the Russian team by more than three seconds.

Australia also won gold medals in the men’s four and women’s rowing competitions to increase their overall Olympics to six, moving up to fifth on the table, with Japan and China ahead at 11th place.

Elsewhere on Wednesday, Dutch rider Annemiek van Vleuten won the women’s time trial around Mount Fuji after being left red-faced on Sunday when she mistakenly thought she had won the road race.

And the defending champions of rugby sevens, Fiji, have prepared a delicious final against New Zealand to take place later in the day.

New Zealand beat Great Britain 29-7 while Fiji beat Argentina 26-14.

Funded

World champion Nikita Nagornyy, fresh from leading the Russian gymnasts to a narrow victory in the men’s team against Japan, will meet Daiki Hashimoto once again in the men’s all-around match.

In men’s basketball, the United States rebounded 120-66 against Iran after losing to a strong French team after their first Olympic defeat in 17 years.

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