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6 of the biggest health worries for men in their 20s

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While everyone should be careful to identify any unusual changes in their body, research by Boots has found that men are less likely to pursue warning symptoms, with men seeing 20% ​​less doctor than their partners.

However, that doesn’t mean they suffer less from health problems. The problem can simply be that men are reluctant to seek help when they need it.

We spoke to the family doctor Dr. Luke Powles spoke to us to learn about some of the most common health problems men in their twenties face today and what to do about them.

Here’s what he had to say …

1. Mental health

“It is important for men in their twenties to take care of their mental health. Unfortunately, suicide is the leading cause of death among young people between the ages of 20 and 34.

“If you are afraid or stressed, speak to your doctor. Getting the right help and support can ensure you are well equipped to manage your mental health for decades to come. ”

2. skin cancer

“There is evidence that extreme sun exposure before the age of 40 can increase an increased risk of skin cancer. A recent study found that nearly three-quarters (73%) of people don’t always use sunscreen and one-third (31%) said they use it more relaxed in the garden at home than when they are abroad.

“My advice is to avoid sun loungers in the summer months and on vacation and to wear sunscreen with a high sun protection factor to protect your future self.”

3. Smoking

“On average, smoking shortens your life expectancy by 10 years and increases your risk of developing heart disease and cancer. But all of this is preventable if you give up the habit sooner rather than later.

“Your 20s is the age to develop good habits and break bad ones. If you’re looking to quit smoking, I recommend setting small, achievable goals for yourself. Telling yourself that you will quit smoking completely can be daunting and you can be doomed to fail.

“Try to cut back slowly. Once that feels comfortable, keep cutting until you stop. You will likely suffer setbacks, but don’t be too hard on yourself and celebrate your successes.

“Some pharmacies and general practitioners’ practices offer smoking cessation clinics. They’re also a great way to help you break the habit. “

4. Alcohol consumption

“Responsible alcohol consumption is important in every phase of life, but liver disease is one of the most common causes of death in men between the ages of 20 and 34.

“Minimizing alcohol consumption can help reduce a number of health problems, including liver disease, heart disease, obesity, and some cancers. Guidelines recommend both men and women to keep their consumption below 14 units per week. ”

5. Testicular cancer

“Although testicular cancer is relatively rare in men, it appears to be increasing. It can occur at any age, but it is the most common type of cancer in men between the ages of 20 and 35.

“Testicular cancer is one of the most treatable types of cancer. Most men make a full recovery, especially if the cancer is diagnosed early. It is therefore important that you contact your family doctor as soon as possible if you feel anything unusual in your testicles. “

6. Acne

“Acne can also be a problem for men in their twenties. The condition can be provoked by the use of whey protein, which is a popular dietary supplement. If you have acne, use non-pore-blocking and oil-free products on your skin to avoid long-term scarring or persistent acne. “

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Men’s Health

Do people experience more anxiety, depression and distress after COVID?

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A recent study posted to the medRxiv* preprint server analyzed mental health outcomes after the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections.

Study: Mental health outcomes following COVID-19 infection: Evidence from 11 UK longitudinal population studies. Image Credit: Danielala/Shutterstock

Background

SARS-CoV-2 infection could lead to symptomatic or asymptomatic CoV disease 2019 (COVID-19). Following early proof from case reports and investigations of other severe CoV infections, mental illness is becoming more widely recognized as a possible complication of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Nevertheless, longitudinal research in this area is scarce, and few studies have attempted to separate the impacts of COVID-19 from the pandemic’s broader mental health implications. As a result, the mental health effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection on the general public are yet unknown.

Notably, the existing longitudinal evidence on the link between SARS-CoV-2 infection and mental health is contradictory. Thus, more longitudinal studies are needed to explain the earlier mixed findings, assess the strength of any correlations, and determine if they are continued long-term after COVID-19.

About the study

In the current research, the scientists evaluated longitudinal connections between COVID-19 and mental health, taking into account 1) time after SARS-CoV-2 infection, 2) mental health before the pandemic, 3) mode of COVID-19 confirmation, and 4) subgroup variations.

The team examined the mental health repercussions of COVID-19 until April 2021 using data from 11 United Kingdom (UK) longitudinal analyses. First, they assessed whether those who have self-reported COVID-19 had higher degrees of psychological distress, anxiety, depression, and inferior life satisfaction than people without SARS-CoV-2 infection. Further, the investigators explored whether relationships changed depending on the time following COVID-19 to evaluate if the effects lasted over the acute disease stage.

In addition, the team analyzed whether there were differences in correlations based on gender, age, education, pre-pandemic mental health, and ethnicity. Furthermore, they evaluated whether SARS-CoV-2 infection and mental health were associated differently in those who had 1) suspected versus test-confirmed COVID-19 and 2) self-reported versus serology-detected SARS-CoV-2 infection.

The team unified continuous mental health measures within each trial over time using information from 11 UK longitudinal investigations encompassing 54,442 subjects and two to eight repeated measurements of COVID-19 and mental health from April 2020 to April 2021. They analyzed the correlations between mental health and test-confirmed, self-reported, or serology-confirmed COVID-19 employing multilevel generalized estimating equations (GEE). Further, random-effects meta-analyses combined effect sizes.

Results and discussions

According to the study results, COVID-19 was linked to a decline in mental health outcomes among the UK population. The findings showed links between COVID-19 and mental health worsening despite adjusting for general effects of timing during the initial year of the pandemic, contributing to the mixed data that had previously been available. The authors found no modification in this connection in the initial few months after SARS-CoV-2 infection.

There were no disparities in ethnicity, sex, pre-pandemic mental health, or education in subgroup analysis, whereas correlations were higher in the elderly population. Although SARS-CoV-2 infection was linked to poor mental health in people of all ages, some data suggested that the correlations were higher in those aged ≥50 years.

The team found identical relationships for both confirmed and suspected COVID-19 with mental health outcomes, implying that the connections might be linked to disease experience rather than virus exposure, emphasizing the importance of psychosocial processes. Self-reported COVID-19 paired with either positive or negative serology was linked with poor mental health.

On the other hand, positive serology lacking self-reported SARS-CoV-2 infection was not correlated to worse mental health. Likewise, the scientists found no indication of variations in mental health outcomes between those with negative and positive serology in another exploratory analysis.

conclusions

Overall, the study findings demonstrated that COVID-19 self-reporting was associated with a decline in life satisfaction and mental health over time. The confined attenuation in the association between COVID-19 and mental health outcomes over time since infection and results from serology-confirmed COVID-19 suggested that the observed impacts may not be specific to SARS-CoV-2 infection. On the contrary, they might represent the mental health consequences of COVID-19 during the pandemic, or other variables might justify them.

The team mentioned that long-term studies investigating recovery in SARS-CoV-2-associated mental health problems were needed to determine the length of symptoms encountered after COVID-19. Moreover, the authors stated that given the high incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infections in the UK and globally, the current findings have significant implications for mental health care provision.

*Important notice

medRxiv publishes preliminary scientific reports that are not peer-reviewed and, therefore, should not be regarded as conclusive, guide clinical practice/health-related behavior, or treated as established information.

Journal reference:

  • Mental health outcomes following COVID-19 infection: Evidence from 11 UK longitudinal population studies; Ellen J Thompson, Jean Stafford, Bettina Moltrecht, Charlotte F Huggins, Alex SF Kwong, Richard J Shaw, Paola Zaninotto, Kishan Patel, Richard J Silverwood, Eoin McElroy, Matthias Pierce, Michael J Green, Ruth Bowyer, Jane Maddock, Kate Tilling , Srinivasa Vittal Katikireddi, George B Ploubidis, Professor D Porteous, Nicholas J Timpson, Nish Chaturvedi, Claire Steves, Praveetha Patalay. medRxiv preprint 2022. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1101/2022.05.11.22274964, https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2022.05.11.22274964v1
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Men’s Health

How the World Reacted to the Footballer Publicly Coming Out As Gay

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On Monday, 17-year-old Blackpool footballer Jake Daniels became the first footballer in a generation to come out as gay.

Sharing his story with Sky Sports News, Daniels said: “For a long time I’ve thought I would have to hide my truth because I wanted to be, and now I am, a professional footballer. I asked myself if I should wait until I’ve retired to come out. No other player in the professional game here is out.

“However, I knew that would lead to a long time of lying and not being able to be myself or lead the life that I want to.”

Since deciding to come out – and becoming the first UK-based current professional to do so since Justin Fashanu in 1990 – Daniels says the reaction from his club and teammates has been “absolutely amazing” and “so supportive”.

The reaction from the rest of the world has been overwhelmingly positive too. “It is a day of great importance for obviously Jake and his family but also for English football,” said former Manchester United footballer Gary Neville on Sky Sports’ Monday Night Football. “It will go down in history. It is a big, big moment for football players. It is of massive importance, this.

“In 2022, we see this as a huge announcement and we see it as a big day and a day of great importance, but in 10 years the success of this will be that it’s seen as being normal,” he added.

Meanwhile, speaking on BBC Breakfast, former England footballer Gary Lineker said: “He’s going down a path that many, many others will follow – they’ve probably just been waiting to see how it pans out for whoever’s first. And I think once they see that the overwhelming majority of people will be more than accepting, others will follow suit.

“I think he will be massively accepted. Not just in his own dressing room but players he plays against. I think, overall, dressing rooms wouldn’t think about it. They will consider if you’re a good footballer or not. That’s all that matters.”

This is how the rest of the football world, and beyond, reacted:

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This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

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Daniel Davis
Daniel Davies is a staff writer at Men’s Health UK who has been reporting on sports science, fitness and culture for various publications for the past five years.

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Men’s Health

Vitamin D3 Is Important, But You Probably Don’t Need a Supplement

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Vitamin D3 is one of those in-the-weeds nutrients—a nutrient you sort of stumble upon during deep discussions with your doctor (if you’re fortunate enough to have that kind of doctor) or during internet rabbit holes (probably more likely) .

And vitamins like D3 tend to bring up a whole host of questions. What exactly is vitamin D3? How does vitamin D3 differ from regular ol’ vitamin D? Where do you get vitamin D3? And what’s the difference between D&D and D3? (Last one is easy: the first is an immersive experiential game.) As for the rest? Let’s start with the basics.

“Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) is a nutrient that’s made in the body when the skin is exposed to sunlight. It can also be found in animal flesh, fish oil, and fortified foods,” says Kim Yawitz, a registered dietitian and gym owner in St. Louis, Mo.

Vitamin D3 is best known for strengthening your bones, which it does by helping the body absorb calcium and phosphorus from food, Yawitz says. “But it also reduces inflammation, boosts the immune system, promotes heart health, and serves other important functions in the body,” she says.

While some nutrients have a “recommended dietary allowance” (RDA), there’s no established guideline for vitamin D3, specifically, says Yawitz. That said: “Men should aim for 600 international units (IU) of vitamin D per day, which can come from vitamin D2, vitamin D3, or a combination of both,” she says.

Because D3 is more easily absorbed than D2, and it also remains in the body longer than D2. “And so, you may be able to get a bit more bang for your buck by choosing foods that are naturally high in vitamin D3,” says Yawitz.

Before we dive into signs of vitamin D3 deficiencies, the best sources of vitamin D3, and more, there is one more important thing to keep in mind: “Vitamin D3 is fat-soluble, which means that you can enhance its absorption by taking it with foods that have a bit of healthy fat,” says Yawitz, adding that this is especially true for supplements and may also be beneficial for food sources of D3 that are naturally low in fat.

What are signs of a D3 deficiency?

Vitamin D may be “the sunshine vitamin,” but you can also get it from your diet.

Tim Robberts

Either way, most Americans are not getting enough of vitamin D. “By some estimates, more than 90 percent of American men don’t get enough vitamin D in their diets. But that doesn’t necessarily mean they’re deficient,” says Yawitz. “Your body makes vitamin D3 when your skin is exposed to sunshine. So even if you don’t eat a lot of foods that are naturally high in D3, your D levels could be fine if you regularly spend even a few minutes in direct sunlight.”

And a true vitamin D3 deficiency can be difficult to identify, simply because there aren’t a lot of easy-to-spot symptoms. “Severe deficiency can lead to osteomalacia—a condition that causes weak and painful bones and sometimes dental issues,” she says.

”One large study also found that people with low vitamin D levels are more likely to experience depression. However, depression alone isn’t a good indicator of low vitamin D3 status.”

What foods are high in vitamin D3?

There’s a host of food sources that are good or excellent sources of vitamin D3.

man vitamin d d3 benefits sun foods

Leontura

Here are some of Yawitz’s top recommendations:

  • Cod liver oil: “Coming in at 1,360 IU per tablespoon, cod liver oil is the best dietary source of vitamin D3 by far,” says Yawitz. Try adding it into a shot of juice like OJ or tart cherry juice if you don’t want to chase it straight.
  • Rainbow trout: If you don’t eat it already, it’s time to add this nutrient-dense fish to your diet. “Three ounces of rainbow trout provide 645 IU of vitamin D3, plus 17 grams of muscle-building protein,” says Yawitz.
  • salmon: “Three ounces of salmon will get you pretty close to your daily D3 quota (570 IU, to be exact) and can also help protect your heart if you have heart disease risk factors,” says Yawtiz, adding that according to a 2021 study, eating 12 ounces of salmon or other fatty fish each week could lower your risk of heart attack and stroke by about 17 percent.
  • Milk: “One cup of 2% milk provides 120 IU of vitamin D, usually in the form of D3. Adding a glass each morning can help protect your teeth and bones, especially as you age,” says said.

    Is taking a vitamin D3 supplement a good idea?

    Vitamin D3 supplements aren’t for everyone, but they may be a good idea for some people.

    “A vitamin D3 supplement could be beneficial if you’re vegan or lactose intolerant, if you have dark skin, if you don’t get a lot of sun, or if you have certain medical conditions,” says Yawitz. “That being said, it’s always best to talk with your doctor before starting any supplement.”

    As she points out, taking high doses of vitamin D3 can lead to nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle weakness, dehydration, kidney stones, kidney failure, irregular heartbeat, and other health problems. Again, talking to a medical professional can help you determine if a vitamin D3 supplement may be right for you.

    This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

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