Connect with us

Men’s Health

US swimmer Michael Andrew says he’s not vaccinated

Published

on

Michael Andrew, a U.S. swimming star who will be attending multiple events in Tokyo later this month, became the biggest Olympic name to date to reveal he hasn’t been vaccinated and said he didn’t want the vaccine to interfere with his training schedule.

As an unvaccinated athlete amid banned Olympics, Andrew’s status could cause problems for the U.S. Olympic team in the event of a COVID-19 horror or contact tracing during the Games. It is expected that vaccinated Olympians will be thought of in these cases – but not the unvaccinated.

At last month’s US Olympic trials, US President and CEO Tim Hinchey estimated that “around 90 percent” of the US national team were vaccinated. It is unknown if other US Olympic swimmers are unvaccinated. There is no compulsory vaccination at the Olympic Games.

Olympic Games in Tokyo:Events held without fans after the new COVID-19 state of emergency was declared

Olympic newsletter:Sign up now to receive the latest Team USA news in your inbox

Andrew, 22, the American record holder in the men’s 100 meter breaststroke, who said he contracted COVID months ago, trained with the U.S. Olympic swimming team in Hawaii and is expected to join the team at the Olympic Village in Tokyo stay.

Both Andrew and his mother were quoted earlier that year as saying he wasn’t and would not be vaccinated, but he hadn’t confirmed his status since joining the Olympic team until he was called during a Zoom US call Swimming Media responded to a question from USA TODAY Sports Thursday night.

“I am not fully vaccinated, I am not vaccinated,” he said. “My reason for this is, on the one hand, that it was a kind of last moment, I didn’t want to put anything in my body that I didn’t know how I would react to.

“As a top athlete, everything you do is very calculated and understood. For me, I didn’t want to risk days in the training cycle, especially before the exams. There were times when you took a vaccine, you had to deal with a few days off. ”

He then praised the national swimming federation’s precautionary measures.

“USA Swimming and all of us here have a very strict protocol of going through a lot of tests, masks, social distancing, distance from the crowds and everything else,” he said. “When we go to Tokyo it is the same with tests every day, so we feel very safe and secure knowing that we are minimizing the risk as much as possible, but personally I haven’t received the vaccine yet and I’m planning on doing this him in the future not future. We will see how it goes on.”

When asked at a previous media session whether there were unvaccinated athletes on the U.S. Olympic swimming team, including whether Andrew had been vaccinated and if he did not pose a risk to the Olympic team, Dave Durden, U.S. men’s Olympic swimming coach, replied , not the question of how “very conscious and very safe” the athletes, coaches and employees in the training camp are, “how we effectively bubble ourselves through our actions, attitudes and behavior”.

At the trials last month, Lindsay Mintenko, executive director of the US national team, said the rules for the Olympic COVID and contact tracing “take into account vaccination status”.

She said: “They will not automatically disqualify you if you are in contact at this point (if the athlete in question has been vaccinated). That was good news for us. I have a lot of concerns over the next few weeks. The health and safety of our athletes is always a top priority. This year it takes on a whole new meaning.

“The virus is still there. It’s out there and we’re going into an environment where we have no idea what the other population has been doing to protect themselves. That makes me nervous. We will do a lot to protect ourselves. But I’m nervous about what we’re going to enter. “

It turns out that one of those who did not protect themselves is in their midst.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Men’s Health

Powerlifting Coach Mark Bell Shares His Best Bench Press Tips

Published

on

The barbell bench press can feel like an easy exercise, especially if you’ve been training for a long time. However, the movement involves more than just lying on a bench and pushing the weight off your chest, especially considering what your goals are in the weight room.

Bench press is a great all-time chest size exercise, but it’s also an important (ahem) benchmark strength move, one of three events in the world of powerlifting competitions (along with deadlifts and barbell squats). When you’re a powerlifter, you’re not just working your way to grow to lift as much weight as you can. If you can’t get your bank up and running, you will never compete.

So some trainers might teach you how to bench press with a focus on hypertrophy in order to build as much muscle as possible. For others, like legendary powerlifter and trainer Mark Bell, who boasts 578 pounds of raw bench press PR, the goal is to push weight. Bell recently shared a long YouTube tutorial about the exercise and really took the time to break down what he thought were the most important aspects of the bench press. He teaches neuroscientist and podcaster Andrew Huberman, Ph.D. made the move with the assistance of trainer Nsima Inyang – but if you want to learn more about this mindset, his tips will work for you too.

How Mark Bell teaches the bench press

For Bell, it all starts with hand placement on the pole. It’s not fixed in any particular point – it depends on what is comfortable for the person doing the exercise. “Just make sure you have an even grip,” he says. Just be sure to press the rod firmly. “When we are pushing a barbell, we want to push it with everything we have because we are trying to initiate from our fingers to our toes. We want everyone to be involved in the bench press. “

As you lie back on the bench, Bell emphasizes the importance of having your chest in an upright position to maintain a neutral spine. “When our back is in a neutral position and our head is in a neutral position – it’s not too far down, not too high – we can express most of the force through our extremities, in this case our arms.”

Men health

When it comes to moving the weight, Bell has a counter-intuitive tip: pull the bar out of the rack instead of pushing it. But there is a method to madness – pushing the weight outward puts your shoulders in a bad position once it is time to get your body into position for the actual press. Especially if you are working with a lot of weight, be prepared to get safely into press mode.

As you lower the weight on your chest, Bell recommends aiming for a point near your sternum that is comfortable to the touch. Tip: If you’re working with a larger belly, use this to shorten your range of motion to make lifting easier.

From here, Bell rewinds a bit to talk about positioning on the bench. He admits that there is controversy over arching the back – but he quickly makes it clear that dramatic postures, in which athletes with shoulders and buttocks as the only points of contact on the bench, are not the goal here. “We’re not trying to arch the lower back,” he says. “We’re aggressively arching our upper backs though, trying to take our shoulders and really screw them into the bank.” This concept is no different from other exercises like the deadlift and squat, where you emphasize “screwing” your feet into the ground to drive down to create strength.

To get this bow, pull yourself down on the bench with the bar. Can’t you find out Let a spotter grab you by the traps to get you into position. Just be careful not to move your body too much and slide down the bench. Then focus on activating your lower body by placing your feet on the floor. “I like it when my heels hit the ground,” says Bell. “Even if you enjoy being on tiptoe, you want to keep your heels all the way down to the floor for your entire range of motion.” That’s because you want to be in a position where your knee is lower than your hip.

Next, Bell says that the key to your arm positioning is to have your bones stacked with your wrist and fists above your elbows and your elbows close to your body. Keeping your arms closed can shorten your range of motion, which in turn makes lifting easier. You can also use your lats and triceps to support your chest from this position.

“Downstairs, if you get it right, you’ll almost feel like you can pull the weight in and be really strong and explosive when you push yourself back up,” he says. When you’re at this lower point, Bell recommends trying “bend the bar” – sometimes at MH we recommend trying to “break the bar” – by rotating your elbows from the outside. This will allow you to get better leverage for your elevator.

When Huberman takes over, Bell has a few more comments on the reach. Remember: how you feel is much more important than an arbitrary position. Be on the lookout for more tips and hacks on how to bench press even harder.


Brett Williams, fitness editor at Men’s Health, is a NASM CPT certified trainer and former professional football player and tech reporter who divides his exercise time between strength and conditioning training, martial arts, and running.

This content is created and maintained by a third party and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may find more information on this and similar content at piano.io

Continue Reading

Men’s Health

How This Man Lost 35 Pounds and Got Shredded in Just 5 Months

Published

on

Lawyer Suang Wijaya, 33, had been slowly gaining weight in recent years, but noted that his weight gain “accelerated” during the pandemic. “Most of it was diet,” he says. “Also, when I had a busy time, I would go out without exercising for a few weeks. I wasn’t feeling too comfortable because my office clothes were suffocating a bit!

In his heaviest form, Suang weighed almost 160 pounds – but it wasn’t until a crucial moment in the work that he realized how much he needed to change.

“My team at work had won an important criminal case,” he explains. “After nine years in prison and a potential death penalty, our client was found innocent and released from prison. Before he returned to his home country, we served him a steak. Our photo with the client was posted on the news was a happy occasion, I just noticed how bloated I looked! So I felt like I had to do something. “

Suang came to Ultimate Performance Singapore and started training with a personal trainer. He did three strength training sessions each week with his trainer and then another three workouts alone, consisting of a mixture of upper and lower body exercises, as instructed by his trainer. After losing 2.2 pounds (1 kg) in his first week, Suang felt motivated to keep pushing himself.

“I’ve learned how important it is to push myself harder with every training session,” he says. “I also learned to do the exercises correctly and safely.”

Just as important as the exercise was the changes Suang made to his diet. “Before Ultimate Performance, I didn’t know about calories, how many calories I had in a day, and how to track calories,” he says. “This trip taught me about calories and the importance of calorie tracking … I now have a better relationship with food and no longer worry about the frequent business lunches I have with my customers.”

Over the course of five months, Suang lost approximately 35 pounds. “My family, friends and colleagues noticed it straight away,” he recalls. “They were very curious about my exercise and diet program. Some of them hired personal trainers themselves!”

“I definitely felt a lot healthier,” he adds. “I have the feeling that I sleep better at night and also get sick less often. Through this trip I also know how important health and fitness are … The first step is always the hardest. After that it will be much more manageable. “


Philip Ellis is a UK freelance writer and journalist specializing in pop culture, relationships and LGBTQ + topics.

This content is created and maintained by a third party and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may find more information on this and similar content at piano.io

Continue Reading

Men’s Health

Lanarkshire band raises charity funds with new track tackling male suicide

Published

on

A Lanarkshire band celebrated the launch of their latest single with an incredible fundraiser for a mental health charity.

The new track from The Naked Feedback, titled Boys Can Cry, explores the suicide rate of men, a topic that is close to their hearts.

The Blantyre band has partnered with the charity Tiny Changes, founded in memory of the late Frightened Rabbit singer Scott Hutchison, who took his own life in 2018.

The Lanarkshire Live app is now available for download.

Get the latest local news – plus features, entertainment, sports and the latest on Lanarkshire’s recovery from the coronavirus pandemic – right at your fingertips, 24/7.

The free download includes the latest breaking news and exclusive stories, and allows you to customize your page to the sections that matter most to you.

Visit the App Store and don’t miss a beat in Lanarkshire – iOS – Android

Through the release, the musicians have raised more than £ 1000. And as part of their effort, two of the boys completed a sponsored run from Glasgow city center to Blantyre.

Singer and guitarist Dean Anderson and drummer Derek Whiteford made the 10-mile performance on the day of release as there were many donors to support the cause.

The idea came after the band got stranded after a night out in Glasgow a few years ago and returned almost on foot as the wait for a taxi was too long.

In the end, they thought against it, but decided to take on the challenge of celebrating their new song – and all for a good cause.

Dean Anderson and Derek Whiteford after the 10 mile run

Speaking of the track, The Naked Feedback hopes to raise awareness about men’s mental health and the alarming rate of suicides in recent years.

It also looks at the mental struggles people have faced over the past 18 months after being hit by the pandemic.

Dean told Lanarkshire Live, “Boys Can Cry is about the struggles that people with mental health problems bring about, but also about the social stigmata that keep the issues from being addressed or addressed.

“The track itself is very aggressive and intrusive, while the lyrical content is a bit softer and almost like a cry for help.

“That was on purpose. Even today it is a taboo for a man to express his feelings and to be written off as weak or not a real man.

“The aggressive music symbolizes this old way of thinking about masculinity, but the gentler message runs parallel.”

Continue reading

It’s also a topic for Dean, who recently lost friends to suicide.

He added, “A lot of people I knew about the lockdown committed suicide. Also, I think everyone’s mental health is in poor health as we were all locked inside.

“The track is more of an overview of central / western Scotland’s mental health affected by lockdowns and the pandemic.

Continue reading

“The line ‘Boys Can Cry, They Shouldn’t Die, Is One Man Enough When He’s Dead?’ sums up the message we’re trying to get across and the topic we’re trying to keep in the spotlight. “

The charity campaign raised a total of £ 1005 for Tiny Changes, raised through a Just Giving page, monetary donations and a generous contribution from HSBC.

The online fundraiser is still active and you can donate here.

And you can listen to Boys Can Cry on Spotify or visit the band’s website for more information.

* Don’t miss the latest Lanarkshire headlines. Subscribe here to our newsletter.

And did you know Lanarkshire Live has its own app? Download yours here for free.

Continue reading
Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending