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Women’s Health

A Utah law holds fathers responsible for pregnancy expenses

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Crystal Cox / Insider

  • The law, which came into force in May, obliges fathers to pay half of the pregnancy-related costs.

  • The bill was introduced by pro-life Republicans hoping to reduce the number of people seeking abortions.

  • Women’s health advocates say the law could have unintended consequences.

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

According to a law that went into effect in May, future fathers in Utah are now legally responsible for half of the expenses of a pregnancy, including the cost of a woman’s health insurance.

Women’s health advocates point out that the bill is an attempt to reduce abortions in the state and that other public policies would have a greater impact on women’s financial well-being.

The bill changes the state’s existing child benefit laws. It applies to fathers who recognize the paternity of the fetus. If they argue that they are not responsible, they must repay the assistance after paternity is established. Men don’t have to share the cost of an abortion.

Other states, including Wisconsin and New York, have laws that can be used to hold the father responsible for pregnancy-related expenses, but Utah law is the first to require men to share the expense, reports The Associated Press.

However, some people who work in the women’s health field say the law could have unintended consequences, including linking women with abusive partners. Domestic abuse often gets worse during pregnancy, reports the AP.

Karrie Galloway, president of the Planned Parenthood Association of Utah, said the bill was misguided.

“While we know that this bill highlights the cost of being pregnant and that many women struggle to cover their health care costs, we believe there are better ways to support pregnant people and families.” she said in a statement from The New York Times. “Expanded Medicaid, better insurance coverage, equal access to reproductive health care, and paid family leave are just a few of the ways policymakers could do a lot more.”

The story goes on

The bill was sponsored by State Representative Brady Brammer and State Senator Daniel McCay, both Republicans.

“I wanted to try to do something that can help the situation, which is people in a really difficult situation who are making a really difficult decision,” Brammer told the New York Times. “It wasn’t necessarily about abortion. It was the idea that abortions happen because they put people in a really difficult position.”

Liesa Stockdale, director of the Utah Office of Recovery Services, who is collecting child support, told the AP she wasn’t sure how useful the new measure would be. She noted that under current law, women can claim fathers for costs related to the birth of a child, but few do. She speculated that it might be similar with the new law.

“I don’t know how often it is used. How often parents choose to pay these costs remains to be seen,” she told the AP. “But if they do, we’re here to collect.”

Read the original article on Insider

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Women’s Health

Coming second in the game of life – Kate Pickett

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“We don’t want to behead the big poppies,” said Boris Johnson in July. But for Kate Pickett, his “leveling” ambitions will require a flattening of the entire social divide.

The not entirely social winners? – a wedding reception on the Thames (Ian Luck / shutterstock.com)

There was enough athletic competition in the summer to remind us how hard it can be not to be quite the winner. In England there was great excitement when the national soccer team reached the final of the European Championship, only to lose there on penalties to Italy. There was almost immediately a backlash of racism and hatred towards the players who missed those crucial final shots on goal.

At the US Open tennis tournament, the women’s final was played by two talented teenagers who had both done spectacularly to get this far – but the disappointment of runner-up Leylah Fernandez was hard to see. And at the Tokyo Olympics, one competitor after another said to the cameras, ‘I’m not here for second place; I’m not here for silver. ‘

But in life, unlike in sport, is the second one surely good enough? We can’t all be winners, but if we have a good education, a good job, and all of our material needs, is that enough for our health and wellbeing?

In some ways it is true: nobody needs excessive income or wealth to be healthy, and too large an income gap between rich and poor is detrimental to the health of the population and the good functioning of society. But it is also true that, like in sports, being the winner is not that important.

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Social slopes

Almost all major causes of death and illness show social inequalities. They are not only more common among the poor and the lower classes of society, while they are rare among the rest of the population. Instead, there is a steady gradient in the incidence of various diseases and causes of death between each level of the social ladder. So while morbidity and mortality are certainly highest among the worst-off, if you are not entirely at the top of the income bracket, not entirely in the top social class, or not well educated, there is a risk of poor health. Illness and death are still a little higher than those directly above you.

This is an almost ubiquitous pattern around the world. We see it in life expectancy and infant mortality, in health behaviors like smoking and obesity, chronic diseases, heart attacks, infections, and most cancers. There are one or two exceptions, particularly breast and prostate cancer, but otherwise there are social health gaps everywhere.

In the graph below, the bars show life expectancy for men and women in England, with the population divided into ten groups, from those most deprived on the left to those least deprived on the right. When we look at such charts, we usually notice the differences between the top and the bottom – here a life expectancy of 9.5 years between the most deprived and least deprived men and 7.7 years between the most deprived and least deprived Men least disadvantaged women.

Life expectancy at birth by decile and gender, England 2018

social gradient

But with every step from prosperity to misery, from right to left, both men and women, on average, lose a little bit of life expectancy. Men in the least disadvantaged group live an average of about 82 years, about a year and a half less than men in the least disadvantaged group of all. Women in the second best group live just over 85 years, but women in the top group live about a year longer.

These are surprising penalties for being among the least disadvantaged instead of making it into the top 10 percent. No one in the top 20 percent is denied any material necessity, and no one is likely to lack the knowledge to make healthy decisions. Nevertheless, people in the second decile still die younger and suffer from almost all acute or chronic diseases more often than in the first.

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Status matters

What these social gradients tell us is how important the social environment is – it’s status itself that matters. If you have a little less status than the one at the top, you are not doing as well as if you are the highest status. If we are to address health inequalities, we need to level the entire gap, not just try to tackle health problems from the bottom up.

While social gradients are almost ubiquitous in the health sector, the steepness of the gradient varies from place to place. Societies with lower economic inequalities have a widespread tendency to have smaller absolute differences in health. Reducing inequalities in income, wealth, education and social class will help society as a whole – not just the poorest or those in dire need. We would all be winners if the playing field was leveled.

Covid-19 of course also has a social gradient. It was never an “equality disease,” as some claimed early on. It’s too late for the pandemic we are in, but some serious social and economic leveling would help us cope with whatever might come next.

This is a joint publication by Social Europe and IPS-Journal

social gradient

Kate Pickett is Professor of Epidemiology, Associate Director of the Center for Future Health, and Associate Director of the Leverhulme Center for Anthropocene Biodiversity, all at the University of York. She is co-author with Richard Wilkinson on The Spirit Level (2009) and The Inner Level (2018).

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Women’s Health

Mon Health Stonewall Jackson Memorial Hospital physician honored by WVSOM

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WESTON, W.Va. – Mon Health Stonewall Jackson Memorial Hospital Obstetrician / Gynecologist Robert Harris, MD, was born on Friday 17th), in Lewisburg.

The Outstanding Preceptor Awards are given to physicians who show professionalism and demonstrate their service to students, including a commitment to teaching, mentoring, and the educational process. They also serve as positive role models, reflecting their commitment to the osteopathic teachings or the Hippocratic Oath and commitment to patient care. Preceptors support and advise the medical students of the WVSOM in their clinical rotations in the third and fourth years.

Students in each region nominate and vote on the preceptors for the awards. The Central East region encompasses the central portion of WV, including Elkins, Buckhannon, Weston, Bridgeport, and Morgantown.

Dr. Harris earned his bachelor’s degree from Quinnipiac College, Connecticut, before earning his medical degree from St. Georges University in the West Indies. He completed his residency at Staten Island University Hospital in New York. He is certified by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology and a Fellow of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

“DR. Harris is an excellent teacher. He challenges you as a student to see your potential. He allows us to perform procedures and has very hands-on experience in obstetrics / gynecology. I’m in with little interest in obstetrics / gynecology gone the rotation but after working with Dr. Harris I appreciate the field a lot more, ”wrote one student.

Other nominators wrote: “Dr. Harris goes way beyond that for his students. He’s a great teacher and really helps students prepare for the post-test rotation and boards. ”Others wrote that Dr. Harris was one of the finest teachers they had worked with and that his ability to teach and work with patients was “paramount”.

In an interview a few years ago, Dr. Harris carefully considered why he made women’s health his specialty.

“I chose Women’s Health because I enjoy short-term and long-term care options. For example, an emergency room cannot maintain a long-term relationship with the patient. This field gives me the opportunity to have both surgical and medical treatments, ”he explained. “But perhaps one of the most important aspects of my practice is the opportunity to be present at the birth. Having a baby is a unique and extraordinary experience. It is more moving than any other experience in the medical field. “

Other doctors at Mon Health Stonewall Jackson Memoria Hospital who have received the award in the past include Dr. Robert Snuffer and Dr. Brian Hornsby.

Approximately 50 hospitals, clinics, and medical centers across West Virginia participate in WVSOM’s statewide campus program. Outstanding Primary Care and Specialty Preceptor Awards were given to physicians in each campus region, including the central (split), eastern, northern, southern, central, southeastern, and southwestern regions.

To learn more about Mon Health Obstetrics and Gynecology, visit MonHealth.com/OBGYN or call 304-269-3108 in Weston.

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Women’s Health

HMC reminds pregnant women of importance of receiving flu va…

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(MENAFN- Gulf Times) As the annual flu season approaches, Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC) reminded pregnant women on Sunday of the importance of getting vaccinated and preventing serious flu illnesses.

Dr. Huda Al Saleh, Senior Consultant in Obstetrics and Gynecology and Executive Director of Quality & Safety at the Women’s Wellness and Research Center, said that vaccinations have been shown to reduce the risk of flu-related acute respiratory infections by around half in pregnant women and pregnant women who are vaccinated against the flu , also help protect their babies from the flu in the first few months after birth, when they are too young to get vaccinated.

She stressed that getting a flu shot during pregnancy can help prevent flu and maternal complications, and that changes in the immune system, heart, and lungs during pregnancy make pregnant women (and people up to two weeks after giving birth) more susceptible to severe flu do. including illness leading to hospitalization.

“The flu is more likely to cause serious illness in pregnant women than in non-pregnant women. Research has shown that flu vaccination reduces a pregnant woman’s risk of hospitalization by an average of 40 percent to prevent potential health problems for the fetus due to the flu. In addition, millions of people have been given flu vaccines with an excellent safety record for many years, “observed Dr. Al Saleh.

According to her, fever is a common flu symptom that can be linked to neural tube defects and other negative consequences for a developing baby. “Having a fever caused by the flu in early pregnancy can increase the risk of birth defects in the fetus. Vaccination can help protect a baby from the flu after birth because pregnant parents make antibodies to the developing baby during pregnancy pass it on, “she remarked.

“Infants are at increased risk of severe flu symptoms, but the flu vaccine cannot be given until they are 6 months old. So if you are given the flu vaccine while you are pregnant, the antibodies you develop will pass through the placenta and through ‘breast milk, if you are breastfeeding. These antibodies help protect your baby from the flu after it’s born, “said Dr. Al Saleh.

She warns that the flu vaccine does not protect against COVID-19, even though they are both contagious respiratory diseases as they are caused by different viruses. “A flu shot is especially important this season as the flu and COVID-19 cause similar common signs and symptoms. The flu shot could reduce symptoms that could be confused with those caused by COVID-19, ”she said.

The flu threatens the health of Qatar’s people, especially those at risk. Every year in Qatar, many people are hospitalized with the flu. Clinical studies have shown that it is safe and effective for people to receive both the flu and COVID vaccines at the same time.

Last updated: September 26, 2021 2:08 PM

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