Connect with us

Women’s Health

How Black Women Can Interpret Those Scary Health Statistics

Published

on

When Halona Black lost her 49-year-old mother to breast cancer in 2006, she was certain that she would face the same fate. She’d seen the data: Black women were 40 percent more likely to die of breast cancer than white women, especially those with close relatives who had been diagnosed.

Ms. Black, who was then living in Florida, was determined to outsmart her fate, despite not having much reliable information on how to do it. She stopped using store-bought deodorants based on unsubstantiated claims that they can cause cancer and started making her own using baking soda. “I’ve tried veganism for a while,” she said. “I know it all sounds crazy, but I really wanted to have a long, happy life.”

As she neared 39, the age at which her mother was diagnosed with cancer, she said she always made rash decisions to get the best of her life. She dropped out of her Ph.D. Program and divorced the man she fell in love with over fear that a conventional life might be wasting her remaining time.

For the past 18 months, Americans have been regularly reminded of their own mortality thanks to the daily reporting of Covid-19 numbers. But for black women, the dull roar of alarming health data was relentless even before Covid-19 and only grew during the pandemic. Being a black woman myself, I found health data appalling, especially last year when I became pregnant and gave birth. While the data and reports are important in policy making, if they become horrific headlines about your community or people who look like you, they can be harmful to your mental health.

“We have been led to believe that a black woman has a certain depressing path in life. If she survives pregnancy and childbirth, her baby can die. If the baby is alive, it will likely be shot by police later in life, ”said Monique Drake, 44, a mother of two in New York City.

Some experts suggest that persistent anxiety like this can fester and turn into chronic anxiety or stress, which can also potentially affect the immune system and make people susceptible to disease. When reading troubling health stories, it is important not to internalize them automatically.

“The general audience should treat any health report with a healthy dose of skepticism,” said Melody Goodman, assistant dean of research and biostatistician at New York University’s School of Global Public Health. “Data can be interpreted in many ways.”

While health records and research provide information about why racial health differences exist and persist, they tend to look at broad categories such as race, class, or income. They do not capture the full experience of an individual and black women, and many experts complain that they are often portrayed as a monolithic group. Information, including its environmental, genetic, behavioral and psychosocial makeup, is often overlooked.

Take the statistics that shook Ms. Black. At first glance, a 40 percent higher death rate among black women with breast cancer is staggering and might lead a layperson to believe that there must be a genetic reason unique to their DNA. But this notion evaporates on examination. For example, if you check socioeconomic status, the incidence of breast cancer in black women is comparable to or lower than that of white women. Low socioeconomic status among black women – meaning they are poor and uninsured – often leads to delays in treatment, which contributes to higher breast cancer mortality rates.

When I got pregnant in August 2020, I worried that I would die 12 times more often from pregnancy complications like high blood pressure during or after childbirth than my white counterparts in New York City. I’ve even read a popular story that if I couldn’t find a black pediatrician, there was a high probability that my baby would die. After working in health communications, I knew headlines can be sensational and not every data point applied to me, but I still worried that something was wrong with my black body. So I went to great lengths to find a black obstetrician and gynecologist.

Of course, nobody is just black, just as nobody is just from New York. A person can be classified in many ways. I am a black American, but I am also an immigrant from Kenya. Seen through the lens of an insured immigrant, my chances and those of my baby were much better.

“When looking at data, it comes down to a personal point of view,” said Dr. Goodman, Assistant Dean of Research and Biostatistician at New York University’s School of Global Public Health. “Not every health report on black women affects all black women.”

The ways geography or personal history affect data are endless. Like that scary background noise about black babies dying more often than white babies if not treated by black pediatricians? This study only looked at cases in Florida.

Additionally, black child deaths in this state are generally higher than white child deaths, which means they can be falsely linked to all sorts of factors – parents’ weight, zip code, or their doctor’s race. That doesn’t mean that one causes the other. Also, as the researchers themselves carefully pointed out, deaths were more likely to occur in complicated pregnancies, meaning they may not have the resources to ensure success. But these subtleties often get lost in the headlines.

The scope of research is always limited – you rarely have enough topics, time, money, or space. But news outlets and social media prefer soundbites, and context is often lacking. The news about black pediatricians was so ubiquitous that a friend in South Africa called and asked me to find a black doctor for my child.

While these statistics have raised awareness of black women’s experiences of racism in the healthcare system, they have also created a sense of impending doom for many black women.

Annie Deitcher, a 31-year-old education program coordinator in Albany, NY, stopped watching the news in 2018 and left social media after seeing the headline “Nothing Protects Black Women From Dying in Pregnancy and Childbirth.” Ms. Deitcher, who was pregnant at the time, was so afraid of giving birth in the hospital that she decided to give birth at home. “Home births are not without risk, but it was the choice that gave me the most peace of mind,” she said.

Patients need individualized, personalized and precise data in order to make good decisions. Black women in particular need accurate narratives about what health research actually means and how they can use it to advocate for appropriate care, said Dr. Goodman. The Black Women’s Health Imperative provides lifestyle support to black women, and the Loveland Foundation is focused on mental health support.

It is important for all media consumers to be selective about the sources of health reporting they are exposed to. If a headline feels ominous or scary, experts suggest looking at two or more other reliable journalistic sources to compare how they report the same results. It is also helpful to share your concerns out loud and discuss disturbing statistics with family and friends, or ask for support on social media.

And occasionally, experts said, it’s possible to just hide it. Ms. Black is now 40, a year older than her mother was when she was diagnosed. She is healthy and now lives in Rwanda, a place she called “gentle and gentle”. She stays away from health-related headlines. “Statistics is an optional drama now,” she said.

Jacquelynn Kerubo is a writer and specialist in public information.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Women’s Health

Holy Cross Women’s Health Institute Meets the Needs of Women in Taos | Health

Published

on

SPONSORED / Meeting the health needs of every member of the Taos Family is a challenge that Holy Cross Medical Center continues to work towards. The newborn members of our ward require very different care than our older fellow citizens, and parishioners of different sexes also require different types of care. Many of women’s specific health needs can be met right here in Taos at the Holy Cross Women’s Health Institute.

Women are vital to maintaining healthy families; Not only can they become pregnant and give birth, but they are often caregivers for children and other family members and thus have an overwhelming impact on the larger community in which we live. Women also tend to live longer than men and need medical assistance at many stages of life. It is therefore particularly important that women of all ages have access to high quality medical services. Such superior health services are available to the women of Taos at the Holy Cross Women’s Health Institute.

It is a rarity in these days of hospital consolidation in rural communities that specialized women’s health care – and OB / GYN services in particular – are available locally. Many rural women have to travel an hour or more to get the care they need. Hence, it is particularly noteworthy that the Holy Cross Women’s Health Institute offers the expert care of three gynecologists – Dr. Tim Moore, who has been an obstetrician in Taos since 2007, Dr. Rameet Singh, who joined the practice in 2018, and the newest addition to the medical team, Dr. Carol Kiesling – as well as the care team of the certified midwives, Naomi Hannah and Anna Hüsner.

The Holy Cross Women’s Health Institute’s health care providers strive to ensure the health of every mother in Taos, from prenatal care to pregnancy and childbirth to post-baby care such as breastfeeding advice and family doctor care.

Women’s health care doesn’t stop with pregnancy, of course, and neither do the services of the Holy Cross Women’s Health Institute. Wellness support begins in childhood with caring for adolescent girls and puberty and continues through a woman’s entire life with family planning, breast care – including Holy Cross Medical Center’s new 3D digital mammography services – and support , during and after menopause, including osteoporosis treatment.

The Holy Cross Women’s Health Institute also offers screening for healthy women to care about women’s sexual health, including cervical cancer screening, sexually transmitted infection testing and prevention, and services for other common reproductive disorders such as abnormal bleeding.

Since the health of an individual woman is inextricably linked to her environment, community health is also a focus of the Holy Cross Women’s Health Institute. They provide services to women affected by substance abuse or violence at home, and strive to improve the collective well-being of the Taos community through the health of their women.

Regardless of their age, specific health needs, or stage of life, women in our community can be confident that they will receive excellent, compassionate, and confidential care here in Taos at the Holy Cross Women’s Health Institute.

Continue Reading

Women’s Health

Crews break ground on women’s health center at Providence St. Joseph campus – Orange County Register

Published

on

A four-story, 137,000 square meter health center for women and babies has laid the foundation stone on the campus of Providence St. Joseph Hospital in Orange.

  • Officials break the ground for the Helen Caloggero Women’s and Family Center at Providence St. Joseph Hospital in Orange, California on Tuesday, September 21, 2021. The four-story, 150,000-square-foot facility provides access to health services, benefits and resources for Orange County’s residents. It is currently scheduled to open in autumn 2023. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Rendering of the Helen Caloggero Women’s and Family Center at Providence St. Joseph Hospital in Orange, Calif., Tuesday, September 21, 2021. The four-story, 137,000-square-foot facility provides access to health services, benefits and resources for Orange County residents. It is currently scheduled to open in autumn 2023. (Courtesy Providence St. Joseph Hospital)

  • Sister Judith Dugan bows her head as the Reverend Kevin Vann blesses the groundbreaking ceremony for the Helen Caloggero Women’s and Family Center at Providence St. Joseph Hospital in Orange, California on Tuesday, September 21, 2021. The four-story, 150,000-square-foot facility will provide Orange County’s residents with access to health services, benefits and resources. It is currently scheduled to open in autumn 2023. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Reverend Kevin Vann prepares to help officials break ground at the Helen Caloggero Women’s and Family Center at Providence St. Joseph Hospital in Orange, Calif. On Tuesday, September 21, 2021. The four-story, 150,000-square-foot facility will provide access to health services, benefits and resources for Orange County’s residents. It is currently scheduled to open in autumn 2023. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Philanthropist Marsh Moeller speaks about her mother Helen Caloggero during a cornerstone ceremony for the Helen Caloggero Women’s and Family Center at Providence St. Joseph Hospital in Orange, Calif. On Tuesday, September 21, 2021. The four-story, 137,000-square-foot facility will be Provide Orange County’s residents with access to health services, benefits and resources. It is currently scheduled to open in autumn 2023. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Officials break the ground for the Helen Caloggero Women’s and Family Center at Providence St. Joseph Hospital in Orange, California on Tuesday, September 21, 2021. The four-story, 150,000-square-foot facility provides access to health services, benefits and resources for Orange County’s residents. It is currently scheduled to open in autumn 2023. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Reverend Kevin Vann prepares to help officials break ground at the Helen Caloggero Women’s and Family Center at Providence St. Joseph Hospital in Orange, Calif. On Tuesday, September 21, 2021. The four-story, 150,000-square-foot facility will provide access to health services, benefits and resources for Orange County’s residents. It is currently scheduled to open in autumn 2023. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

The crews began work on the new facility on Tuesday, which will occupy a space on the corner of Main Street and Stewart Drive. Orange Mayor Mark Murphy, Orange County Supervisor Donald Wagner and Bishop of Orange Rev. Kevin Vann showed their support for the new development at a ceremony on site.

The Helen Caloggero Women and Family Center – named after the mother of a major donor to the project – will streamline services to women and families, hospital officials said, bringing “mother-and-baby services currently available in nine different locations across the hospital.” one “. central location.”

The center offers a variety of women’s health resources, including pelvic health and rehabilitation services, exams for mothers and their babies, mental health services, and a pharmacy.

Part of the facility will also become a new natural birthing center “where women will receive the individual care midwives provide in a home setting,” according to a press release. Food, retail and office space are among other features of the future location.

“We are excited to offer our patients this wide range of services in a beautiful, new and convenient location as it will truly make it easier for them to access our world-class caregivers and the latest innovative technology in one place,” said Michelle Genova , Chief Nursing Officer at Providence St. Joseph Hospital, in the news release.

The center is scheduled to open in 2023. The St. Joseph Hospital Foundation is still raising $ 2.3 million for the new facility.

Continue Reading

Women’s Health

‘Bachelor In Paradise Couples’ Who End Up Together, Per A Matchmaker

Published

on

Lots of adorable couples have come and gone this season of Bachelor in Paradise – but which ones are staying here? From Reality Steve’s post-show spoilers to the fans’ incredible super detective skills, there are some popular theories.

But most of these guesses are missing a key factor: chemistry. After all, a couple is only as good as their food-related innuendos (if you look at you, Kenny and Mari).

Amber Kelleher-Andrews is the co-founder and CEO of Kelleher International, one of the largest matchmaking companies in the US, seemed doomed from the start.

Ready to Hear the Cold Hard Truth About Your Favorites? Amber spills it all below:

What’s so different about dating on TV?

“The hard thing about TV is that it’s all very inflated,” explains Amber WH. “The culture of this is that you shouldn’t care about anyone other than yourself and the person you want to be with.”

That would put a strain on everyone’s relationship – but Amber says it’s especially difficult for Paradise candidates because they juggle other factors that don’t come into play in real life. “Kindness is somehow swept under the rug,” she says. “And kindness is one of the most important things you look for in a relationship with someone.”

This applies to both men and women, she adds. “In terms of matchmaking, it’s a word that is used quite a lot: ‘You have to be kind.'”

This season, Amber says she “really felt for the cast” and the tricky dating situations they got into. But overall, she rates the candidates themselves as pretty good matchmakers. “They are banding together, but if I had a choice I would say, ‘Yeah, I would bring the two together. And I would definitely bring these two together,'” she said.

Maurissa Gunn and Riley Christian

Craig SjodinGetty Images

Amber’s judgment? Maurissa and Riley are a great pairing, but she’s not sure if they’re built to last. “I really thought he was so cute with Marissa,” she says. “It will break my heart to see what happens, but I really like her.

Her only red flag is Riley’s laid-back attitude. “I just feel like he’s a little more of a charmer,” says Amber. But guys like that “can turn into good guys,” she added. “I watched him like, ‘Is this his time? Will he be that guy? And he doesn’t have enough camera time to tell me. “So the jury has not yet decided on these two.

Brendan Morais and Pieper James

abcs

Craig SjodinGetty Images

The couple fans love to hate actually have more staying power than you might think. “They seem totally in love with each other,” says Amber. “But the thing is, Brendan is not only assertive, but he’s also out of control of his own emotions. And so he could implode himself.”

“He doesn’t seem to really have his own feelings,” she adds. “Something is wrong with him.” Amber says her real tip was to see how Brendan acted around Natasha. “He couldn’t even be straight with her,” she explains. “I was like, ‘Wait a minute. You’re not even able to say the words you’re thinking.'”

And the future of Brendan and Pieper? “I think he looks cute with Pieper and they have chemistry,” decides Amber.

Joe Amabile and Serena Pitt

abcs

Craig SjodinGetty Images

Let’s get one thing straight, “It’s really clear that he really, really, really likes his ex, Kendall,” says Amber. “And he’s not 100 percent honest, but that’s because he doesn’t really want to stick to Kendall.”

ICYMI, Joe, and Kendall originally split because he wanted her to move to Chicago with him, and she said no. (Fair enough.) But Amber thinks “if she had come” [on Paradise] and said, ‘Listen, I’m in love with you and I want to move to Chicago and give us a real chance,’ “then Joe would have left Serena sooner than Wells Adams can make a cocktail.

“His feelings are real for her, and he could fall in love with her again right in front of Serena,” says Amber. “I really don’t know what’s going to happen to them, I can’t tell – but he really likes them both.” Sounds like the producers focused on the wrong love triangle, if you ask me.

Kenny Braasch and Mari Pepin

abcs

Craig SjodinGetty Images

Kenny and Mari win first place for Paradise’s cutest couple as far as Amber is concerned. Although Kenny got distracted by Demi Burnett in the first few episodes, Amber says, “He seems like a really nice guy and I think he’s probably really ready to settle down. Mari seems like a really suitable partner for him.”

Her age difference of 15 years doesn’t let her upset either: “She’s very grown up,” Amber adds. She thinks Mari is a great partner who shares her feelings with Kenny from the start. “I think there’s a chance these two might actually work,” Amber told WH.

Abigail Heringer and Noah Erb

abcs

Craig SjodinGetty Images

“I love Abigail and Noah,” says Amber. But she really wants these two lovebirds to “have more sparks. They are something of a married couple”. Because of this lack of chemistry, she is “not sure what will happen to these two” (even if they are the butter of each other’s toast).

Becca Kufrin and Thomas Jacobs

abcs

Craig SjodinGetty Images

At first glance, Amber says, Becca and Thomas are actually a pretty cute couple. “I think they make a lot of sense,” she explains. “I think that is Tammy [Ly] suited him strangely. “

Amber adds that Thomas and Becca go well together visually. “When I look at Thomas’ stature, his build, and then all of the women, you think, ‘Okay, it has to be Becca.’ It’s big, it’s statue-like, it’s the Bachelorette. So it makes sense. “

But in terms of relationship, this duo just isn’t built for the long haul. “She can do so much better,” says Amber. “In the end, is that really the guy you’re going to end up with?” So she won’t be surprised if the two split up: “If they get married, I still say it’s not a match until they split up and she says, ‘He cheated on me and he’s an idiot.’ And I would say, ‘There it is!’ “

Sounds like Bachelorette Katie Thurston was right when she warned the other Paradise ladies to stay away from Thomas on Us Weekly.

Tre Cooper and Tahzjuan Hawkins

abcs

Craig SjodinGetty Images

Despite Tahzjuan’s previous affair with Tres uncle, these two actually seemed like a great couple. “It was cute,” says Amber of their brief relationship. “And he was one of my favorites.”

Amber was disappointed that Tahzjuan had dropped her association with Tre as soon as Riley arrived. She also believes the Paradise producers cut out some footage that would have made Tahzjuan’s decision more meaningful. “One night she just screamed on the beach and Tre was kind of outside. And I asked, ‘What actually happened?’ “Says Amber.

Aside from glitches and missed connections, Amber thinks Tre and Tahzjuan should try again. “The two of them should at least meet up when they get home,” she says. (Personally, I fully and completely agree!)

This content is created and maintained by third parties and imported onto this page to assist users in providing their email addresses. You may find more information on this and similar content at piano.io

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending