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As Crackdown Looms, South Korea’s Defiant Cryptocurrency Fans Dig In

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Yun Hae-ri, a 26-year-old South Korean cryptocurrency investor, has nearly lost the value of a coin called Metadium since it was purchased in April.

Like many South Korean retail investors, Yun has thousands of won in smaller cryptocurrencies that are viewed as alternatives to Bitcoin and have depreciated as regulators crack down on the sector. Bitcoin price in India was Rs. 24.4 lakhs as of 12.30pm IST on July 13th.

By September 24, South Korea’s numerous cryptocurrency exchanges are required to disclose risk management and work with banks to ensure trading accounts are held by real people.

The rules, analysts say, could result in exchanges deleting hundreds of such altcoins as they compete for ties with banks.

“I have to admit that I didn’t look at the operator’s financial statements, but instead invested on recommendations from the media and friends mainly because of the popularity and appearance of the coin,” said Yun, the Metadium at Upbit, the largest crypto exchange on the Landes, acts. She now fears that Metadium could be removed from the list before the September deadline.

The new law was passed in early March and since then only four of more than 60 exchanges – Upbit, Bithumb, Coinone and Korbit – have secured the partnerships with banks required to register as virtual asset providers.

The law also requires that they obtain a security certificate from the South Korean Internet Security Agency. By May, only 20 exchanges had received such certificates.

Metadium’s price plummeted as much as 94 percent from early April to SKW 32.1 (roughly 2) in late June on Upbit as several local cryptocurrency exchanges took dozens of altcoins from their platforms.

At the end of June, Upbit stopped trading 24 altcoins such as Komodo, AdEx, Lbry Credits, Ignis, Pica and Lambda. Another big operator, Bithumb, nixed four coins last week.

Smaller operator Probit removed 145 coins at once in June, raising concerns among investors that more coins might be removed as the September deadline approaches.

Both Upbit and Bithumb officials told Reuters that the delistings were part of their regular coin reviews, not because of the new regulation.

According to the office of opposition lawmaker Yoon Doo-hyun, however, both the number of coins listed and their risk profile are weighed up by the banks as factors in their decision to enter into exchange partnerships.

GOPAX, one of the most popular exchanges outside of the big four Korea, said it is in talks with several banks and is optimistic that it will meet all requirements before the deadline.

‘HODL’

The ordinance targets money laundering and high leverage among young South Koreans betting on a sector where coins like ether have halved after rapid spikes.

According to the office of another opposition legislature, Kwon Eun-hee, more than two-thirds of new investors on the four major exchanges were under 40 in the first quarter.

BofA Securities said in a report released in May that the estimated daily volume of South Korean cryptocurrency trading reached SKW 1,480 trillion (approximately Rs.9,620 billion) in the first quarter, sometimes exceeding the combined trading volume on the KOSPI and KOSDAQ exchanges.

An official with the Financial Services Commission told Reuters that exchanges that do not comply with the new regulations will not necessarily have to close, but will not be able to trade the won.

“The revised law itself aims to prevent illegal money laundering activities. There are user protection and market stability laws pending and they should be able to continue addressing issues with (cryptocurrency) users, ”he said.

Many investors are now determined to “hold on for their lives” or “HODL” as it is known in the cryptocurrency community.

Lee Jai-kyung, 27, who has invested 40 million SKW (approximately 26 lakhs) in cryptocurrencies, says he has lost 56 percent of his holdings but has no plan to reduce his losses.

“I’m going to leave my coin investment as it is because I’ve already lost so much that there is no point in withdrawing now,” Lee said. “More than that, I’ll hold on to it because I believe there will be another price hike later this year.”

© Thomson Reuters 2021

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Orlando residents launch cryptocurrency group to educate and give back to international communities

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From donations to food drives, there are many ways you can give back to communities in need but three Orlando residents are turning to digital tools to support low-income families in developing countries. Chris Delgado, Fabian Kumpusch and Vance Fundora share a vision of rebuilding and impacting communities around the world.”Where can our dollar literally go the furthest?” co-founder of ‘Crypto Impact’ Vance Fundora said. The answer led them to the way they grow their own personal finances – cryptocurrency which is a type of currency that uses digital files as money. The men recently launched their group ‘Crypto Impact’ where they’re traveling abroad to help communities in poverty. “You can literally send money to an individual in need through blockchain technology where banks are shut down and you can’t really wire money like we do here in the states and those countries don’t have a cell or Venmo type thing,” co -founder of ‘Crypto Impact’ Chris Delgado said. “Normally when people donate they’re donating to a bigger cause where they’re providing food for disaster relief,” Delgado said. “This where ‘Crypto Impact’ comes into play we’re delivering specific needs to individuals and we’re there on the ground.”When WESH 2 spoke with Delgado and Fundora, their third business partner was in Vietnam where he was connecting people with clothing, food and clean water. It’s the start of future international projects that will all be funded by digital coins.”It’s just a new industry and it’s a lot of opportunity across the board in terms of technology available,” Fundora said. Being on the ground with the people they’re giving back to is vital for the men so they can educate and raise awareness. “To show not only the beauty behind crypto and bring mass adoption, but also to give in other countries where you can’t necessarily bring in hundred, 200 or 300 hundred dollars but with crypto you can,” Delgado said. The friends have plans to travel and spread ‘Crypto Impact’ to other developing countries in the future.

From donations to food drives, there are many ways you can give back to communities in need but three Orlando residents are turning to digital tools to support low-income families in developing countries.

Chris Delgado, Fabian Kumpusch and Vance Fundora share a vision of rebuilding and impacting communities around the world.

“Where can our dollar literally go the furthest?” co-founder of ‘Crypto Impact’ Vance Fundora said.

The answer led them to the way they grow their own personal finances – cryptocurrency which is a type of currency that uses digital files as money.

The men recently launched their group ‘Crypto Impact’ where they’re traveling abroad to help communities in poverty.

“You can literally send money to an individual in need through blockchain technology where banks are shut down and you can’t really wire money like we do here in the states and those countries don’t have a cell or Venmo type thing,” co -founder of ‘Crypto Impact’ Chris Delgado said.

“Normally when people donate they’re donating to a bigger cause where they’re providing food for disaster relief,” Delgado said. “This where ‘Crypto Impact’ comes into play [because] we’re delivering specific needs to individuals and we’re there on the ground.”

When WESH 2 spoke with Delgado and Fundora, their third business partner was in Vietnam where he was connecting people with clothing, food and clean water.

It’s the start of future international projects that will all be funded by digital coins.

“It’s just a new industry and it’s a lot of opportunity across the board in terms of technology available,” Fundora said.

Being on the ground with the people they’re giving back to is vital for the men so they can educate and raise awareness.

“To show not only the beauty behind crypto and bring mass adoption, but also to give in other countries where you can’t necessarily bring in hundred, 200 or 300 hundred dollars but with crypto you can,” Delgado said.

The friends have plans to travel and spread ‘Crypto Impact’ to other developing countries in the future.

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Bitcoin is ‘not immune’ from stock market volatility (Cryptocurrency:BTC-USD)

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Bitcoin (BTC-USD) has often been hyped as an inflation hedge or as an alternative investing class, an opportunity to diversify a portfolio. However, evidence continues to mount, especially in the recent market downturn, that crypto holds a high correlation with stocks (SP500).

This connection is evidenced by the fact that both bitcoin and equities grinded higher in the easy money era of 2020-2021, and now both are facing cyclical downturns as financial conditions tighten and liquidity dries up.

“The correlation between bitcoin and equity indices has remained high and will continue to do so unless bitcoin becomes widely used as a medium of payment – which looks unlikely to happen soon,” Morgan Stanley analyst Sheena Shah wrote in a note May 10.

For some context, the rolling 120-day correlation between the S&P 500 index (SP500) and bitcoin (BTC-USD) was recently standing at 0.60, the highest reading since the series began in 2011, Charles Schwab Chief Investment Strategist Liz Ann Sonders wrote in a Twitter post May 10. In other words, bitcoin’s price action resembles that of stocks and therefore risk assets. Take a look at the chart below to further grasp how bitcoin has fared Y/Y with the S&P 500 as well as S&P volatility, which is inversely correlated with the major stock index.

For a macro perspective, as central banks across the globe pivot to tighter monetary policy (some more aggressive than others) in an effort to dull widespread inflationary pressures, global money supply growth continues to decelerate from its peak in Feb. 2021, Shah noted, adding that bitcoin’s (BTC-USD) market cap growth topped a month later in March 2021, implying that global liquidity and bitcoin could share a connection.

Note that in 2020, speculative assets like bitcoin soared in price in the wake of extraordinary accommodative monetary/fiscal policy and surging money supply. Stifel recently predicted for bitcoin to reach as low as $15K as shrinking M2 money supply growth, a broad measure of money in circulation, “should sharply weaken Bitcoin.”

Looking at the BTC-stocks correlation from a different lens, retail investors used to be the dominant cryptocurrency trader around four years ago, but now “the largest proportion of daily crypto trading volumes is from crypto institutions, much of which comes from them trading with each other,” Shah explained.

This dynamic has contributed to bitcoin’s (BTC-USD) strong bond with equities since those institutions are sensitive to the availability of capital and therefore interest rates, she added.

Commentary: “We’ve definitely seen [bitcoin] trade more in line with stocks and more in line with the Nasdaq and tech stocks, in particular, over the last few quarters,” Coinbase (COIN) CFO Alesia Haas told CNBC’s Squawk Box in an interview May 12. “Lots of institutional money has come into crypto, and with the broader volatility that we’re seeing, we’ve seen strong correlations,” she added.

Take a look at SA contributor’s The Digital Trend’s bullish take on bitcoin.

Earlier this past week, (May 12) Bill Miller said he hasn’t sold any bitcoin.

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Pros, cons of cryptocurrency mining in upstate New York

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Last month, the New York state Assembly voted to pass Democratic Assemblymember Anna Kelles’ two-year moratorium on new cryptocurrency mining. The idea behind the bill is to give the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation the time to conduct an environmental impact study of the practice.

The bill would prevent new permits from being issued for a very specific kind of cryptocurrency operation, known as carbon-base fueled, proof-of-work mining operations, that use behind-the-meter energy.

The bill still needs to pass in the state Senate and be signed by Gov. Kathy Hochul before it can become law.

The allure of cryptocurrency is that by using blockchain technology, financial transactions are instantaneous, secure and very difficult to trace. But there is a downside to proof-of-work mining: it takes enormous amounts of energy to run the thousands of computers used to “mine” coins.

This is why Assemblymember Kelles said her bill is so narrowly focused.

“This particular type of validation of cryptocurrencies is called proof-of-work, which is synonymous with cryptocurrency mining. There is no other kind of method that is called mining. It has been found across the globe to use phenomenal amounts of energy in comparison to other forms of validation such as proof-of-stake, for example,” Kelles told Capital Tonight.

Cryptocurrency “mining” isn’t mining in the usual sense of the word. It’s millions of computers competing with each other to validate transactions. The more computers a miner has, the greater the advantage — and the more energy used.

Upstate New York is attractive to cryptocurrency miners for a variety of reasons, including abundant clean air and water, relatively cool temperatures and cheap hydroelectric energy with which to power computers.

Upstate New York also has several old power plants that are ready-made to house these mining operations, some of which are being purchased by publicly-traded companies. These companies are re-purposing the power plants to make their own energy “behind the meter,” meaning it is produced and consumed on-site.

“We are a prime target,” Kelles said of upstate.

One of the largest cryptocurrency mining operations in upstate New York is Greenidge Generation, located on the shores of Seneca Lake in the Finger Lakes region. Critics, including Kelles, argue that the crypto-mining taking place at Greenidge is hurting the already established agritourism and wine industry there.

The Greenidge Generation bitcoin mining facility is in a former coal plant by Seneca Lake in Dresden. (AP Photo)

The assembly member also argues that cryptocurrency mining is not a big job creator.

“Mining itself is not a huge job creator because the computers, first of all, are doing all the work. But secondly, what’s really important, is that the algorithm they are running is very simple. It’s not like the algorithm for the Skype app… and therefore it doesn’t take a massive amount of engineering jobs…to maintain,” Kelles said.

“[Cryptocurrency mining] is a very small fraction of jobs compared to [agritourism],” Kelles said.

But cryptocurrency advocates, including Republican Assemblyman Robert Smullen, argue that New York is a world leader in financial services, so why shouldn’t the state lead when it comes to cryptocurrency as well?

Smullen also takes issue with Kelles’ characterization of the jobs created by such operations.

“These are good jobs because they’re electrical jobs, essentially, is what they are, and they’re running all of these facilities,” Smullen explained. “This is a new form of advanced manufacturing.”

Indeed, the union IBEW is a supporter of cryptocurrency mining.

As for Greenidge Generation in particular and its plan to expand from the 17,000 computers it has operating currently, Smullen isn’t concerned.

“[Greenidge] is probably one factory in one small part of one town so I don’t think it’s disrupting any agritourism brand for the beautiful area of ​​the Finger Lakes,” Smullen told Capital Tonight.

What the assemblyman is very concerned about is the possibility of a two-year moratorium on new cryptocurrency operations.

“In this industry, two years is literally light speed in the blink of an eye,” Smullen said. “This industry, financial technical things, they can go anywhere.”

The key, according to the assemblyman, is getting miners to come to New York, and then keeping them here.

“This is commerce that’s very important to the future of financial services industry. During the pandemic, we saw that jobs in New York City, many of them could be done from anywhere. My concern then and my concern now is that we’ve set up a regulatory environment in this state which positively incentivizes the financial services industry, which is going to evolve over time with technology to stay in New York state,” Smullen said.

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