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The latest 6 winners of ‘MI Shot To Win’ COVID-19 vaccine lottery

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Six more Michigandans, including two from Oakland Counties and the first from the Upper Peninsula and Thumb areas, will burn tens of thousands more dollars as the newest winners of the MI Shot To Win COVID-19 vaccine sweepstakes.

The Protect Michigan Commission announced the latest winners of the $ 50,000 daily prizes on Wednesday. The latest winners and their vaccination dates are:

  • Debbie Cameron from Port Huron, July 14th
  • Brianna Hrejsa from Grand Rapids, July 18th
  • Brian Louissa of West Bloomfield, July 19th
  • Diedre Malloy, from Kincheloe in the UP, July 20
  • Joshua Long, of Grand Rapids, July 21st
  • Joel Cotton, South Lyon, July 22nd

They join 16 other Michiganders who won $ 50,000 daily in draws in the sweepstakes after receiving their first doses of the COVID vaccine last month. Grand Blanc’s LaTonda Anderson won the $ 1 million award.

Repetition: Next round of the winners of the vaccine competition “MI Shot To Win”

The nine four-year college scholarship winners and other winners of the day will be announced on August 11th. The grand prize winner of $ 2 million will be announced on August 18th.

The Director of the Protect Michigan Commission, Kerry Ebersole Singh, and the President of the Small Business Association of Michigan and former Michigan Lt. Gov. Brian Calley announced the fourth round winners.

Malloy, 66, manager of a welding and manufacturing company, gave an emotional video message. The wife and mother of one son said she intended to get the COVID vaccine earlier this year but was diagnosed with esophageal cancer in December.

She had to choose between the vaccine or cancer treatment and choose treatment.

Once her doctor gave her the OK and her immune system was strong enough to get the vaccine, Malloy said she had an appointment with Sault Ste. Marie tribe of the Chippewa Indians.

A screenshot of Diedre Malloy, 66, of Kincheloe, Michigan, who was vaccinated on July 20, 2021 and was one of the recipients of a $ 50,000 daily draw

“It took a load off me,” Malloy said when he got the first dose of the vaccine.

She said her husband and son both received the vaccine earlier this year to protect them from the virus.

More:10 More Winners Richer by $ 50,000 in MI Shot To Win COVID-19 Vaccine Lottery

Malloy said she had Medicare Part A but no other insurance. She said the tribe picked up many of her bills but there is still a financial burden as she is being treated for cancer in Traverse City, about a three-hour drive from her home.

She said winning $ 50,000 in the vaccine sweepstakes was “just real sunshine.” She said she saw a light at the end of the tunnel – “and in this case I know it’s not a train.”

She said COVID-19 was a concern for everyone and especially scary for them with their cancer diagnosis. She said she had difficulty breathing, could not eat, and was weak. She said that if she had contracted the coronavirus, “it would have killed me. I have no doubt of that.”

More:COVID-19 delta variant that leaves a cascade of events

More:COVID-19 Delta Variant, Vaccination Regulations, and Masks: Answers to Your Biggest Questions

Malloy and other winners expressed concern about the Delta variant of the virus, the highly transmissible and predominant mutation that is currently spreading in the United States.

“People need to understand that this won’t just go away unless we do something about it,” Malloy said, adding, “It’s worth it if we can just cut our numbers. So that we can go back to some kind of normalcy. What a blessing it would be for everyone. “

Hrejsa, a respiratory therapist in Greenville, Michigan, said she was reluctant to get the COVID vaccine because it didn’t have full approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

She said her partner is immunocompromised and she works in direct patient care. She continued researching and decided to get vaccinated to protect herself, her partner, and her community.

Hrejsa said that for so many online articles that provide information, as many “spit out misinformation”. She said the vaccine was an opportunity to get back to normal.

“I’m tired of worrying about getting sick,” she said.

Hrejsa said she plans to use her profits this semester to buy textbooks to complete her second degree, but will save most of it and possibly use some of it on a down payment for a house.

Cameron said she was working at a local hospital and seeing what happened to COVID patients; and she doesn’t want this to happen to her loved ones. She will use the money to pay medical bills as she is unemployed and has little income.

Louissa, a broker, said his daughter encouraged him to get the vaccine. He had the virus “pretty bad” in late November / early December, but recovered. He said his daughter plans to have a family and spend time with them and doesn’t want him to get sick again.

He was previously on the fence, but not for political reasons. He said he thought he had antibodies that would protect him, but these couldn’t last, so he decided to get the injection.

More:Detroit 3 employees must mask themselves regardless of COVID-19 vaccination status

Long, who works in the construction and supply industry, told officials he did not plan on getting vaccinated but kept hearing about the sweepstakes. His decision coincided with his wife’s decision, Calley said.

Long said the family did not want to run the risk of their children becoming infected with the Delta variant between the ages of 2 and 6. He told officials he planned to use the money to pay a deposit on a new house.

Cotton, who works at Ford Motor Co. and is a small business owner, said after following the data, he and his wife decided to schedule their vaccinations. You have three young daughters and plan to use part of the profit towards a down payment for a new home.

“I wanted to protect myself, my family and my community,” Cotton said, adding that he and his family were not harmed by COVID-19, but some of his employees were affected by the virus.

Protect Michigan Commission officials said data from the state Department of Health shows that COVID vaccinations rose week by week during the sweepstakes, which began July 1 and ended on Tuesday. Here is the breakdown of the first doses given each week in July:

  • 28,770 first doses administered from July 4th to 10th
  • 30,502 first cans dispensed July 11-17
  • 35,952 first doses administered July 18-24
  • 41,150 first cans dispensed July 25-30

Singh said that about 158,000 Michigandans received the first-dose shots in July.

“We’re pleased with the progress we’ve made,” she said, adding that vaccination rates are typically low in the summer; and the sweepstakes was a way to keep the COVID vaccinations going this summer.

Calley said he was “more impressed with 40,000 firearms last week than I was with 400,000 in May” because July is probably the toughest month to get vaccinations and it’s getting harder and harder to reach people through that vaccine.

“It’s a heavier elevator than anything that came before,” he said. “I know the work ahead is even harder.”

More:Experts say Michigan’s COVID-19 vaccine lottery might attract some, but not all, to be shot

As of Monday, more than 2.4 million people have signed up for the chance to win the $ 2 million prize, and nearly 105,000 young Michiganers ages 12 to 17 have signed up for the scholarship prizes.

The prizes are part of nearly $ 5 million in cash prizes and college scholarships in a sweepstakes to incentivize Michigandians to get a COVID vaccine and to meet state and national goals of a 70% vaccination rate for those ages 16 and older to achieve.

Governor Gretchen Whitmer will speak about the COVID-19 vaccine sweepstakes in Michigan on Thursday, July 1, 2021.

According to the state’s vaccine dashboard, as of Tuesday, more than 5.1 million Michigandans, or 63.8% of the population 16 and older, received at least one dose of COVID vaccine.

More than 504,000 Michiganers ages 16 and older still need an initial dose of the vaccine to meet the 70 percent goal, according to state data. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s COVID-19 tracker, the U.S. has hit the 70% mark for Americans 18 and older who received a first dose this week.

As of Tuesday, 58.5% of Michigan residents ages 12 and older had received at least one dose of vaccine and 54.1% were fully vaccinated, according to the state’s dashboard.

More:Analysis: Michigan’s next COVID-19 surge is imminent. Whitmer says her hands are tied

More:Beaumont 2nd Michigan Health System in One Day to Prescribe COVID-19 Vaccines for Workers

Dr. Richard Leach, chairman of the Henry Ford Health System’s Women’s Health Service, said Wednesday it is recommended that pregnant women get the COVID vaccine and that it be safe for the first, second, or third trimester.

He said there could be serious, life-threatening complications for the mother and fetus if the pregnant mother contracted the virus. He said studies have shown vaccinated pregnant women pass antibodies to their fetus that could protect them after birth.

The sweepstakes is one of several ways officials are trying to increase vaccination rates for people 12 and older, as the Delta variant, a mutation native to India, has become the dominant strain in the country.

Last week, the CDC recommended that people fully vaccinated against the virus wear a mask indoors in parts of the country that are COVID-19 hotspots. But this is starting to become a lot of the US

Singh has said officials are closely following the Delta variant in Michigan and are starting to hear about the Delta Plus variant.

The state health department said Tuesday 233 cases of the Delta variant had been identified in 39 counties – nearly half the counties in the state – as well as in the city of Detroit. Sixteen cases concern foreign residents.

The Washington Post reported that at least two cases of the Delta Plus variant have been recorded by officials in South Korea. This variant, first identified in Europe in March and known as B.1.617.2.1 or AY.1, has been discovered in the UK, the US and India, according to the newspaper.

The newspaper’s report said that some experts believe the variant is more transferable than the delta variant.STILL

Contact Christina Hall: chall@freepress.com. Follow her on Twitter: @challreporter.

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Women’s Health

The 9 life-changing habits your doctor wishes you would adopt when you turn 40

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BEFORE we know, it is midlife – and words like “crisis” and “expansion” take on a whole new meaning.

You may have been stuck on a dead end with some bad habits creeping in, but that doesn’t mean it’s all downhill from here.

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From eye tests to orgasms, these lifestyle adjustments will make all the difference in your midlifePhoto credit: Getty

A few laugh lines and extra pounds that seemingly impossible to manage are just evidence of a well-lived life – and there are many simple changes you can make to ensure the only way up is.

“It’s never too late to change,” says This Morning GP, Dr. Philippa Kaye, too Fabulous. “If you adopt a few healthy habits in middle age, you can add years to your life.”

Share here Dr. Kaye and a panel of experts share her top tips.

1) HAVE YOUR EYES TESTED: With age, the risk of developing eye diseases such as cataracts, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma increases.

Says Ophthalmologist Elizabeth Hawkes, “It’s really important to see an ophthalmologist once a year if you have family eye problems, and every two years if you don’t.

Many of these eye diseases have no symptoms at an early stage and treatment options are better if they are detected early. “

And it’s not just your eyesight that is at stake, Elizabeth reveals. “

An eye check can also detect diabetes, high blood pressure, autoimmune diseases and certain types of cancer – often before symptoms appear. “

2) HAVE SEX: Typically, as we get older and life gets in the way, our sex lives can get out of hand. But for the sake of your health, have more sex!

“Just one orgasm a week is enough to have tremendous mental health benefits,” says sex and relationships expert Kate Taylor.

“Also, climaxes work to improve the health of men and women, stop vaginal dryness that can occur with age, lower blood pressure and levels of the stress hormone cortisol, and regulate hormones.

“Once a week is fine – it’s best with a partner as it releases the bonding hormone oxytocin, but solo sex is also good for you.”

Hormone expert Dr.  Martin Kinsella says taking time out to relax can be helpful

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Hormone expert Dr. Martin Kinsella says taking time out to relax can be helpfulImage credit: Pexels

3) TAKE TIME TO RELAX: While the median age for a woman reaching menopause is 51, according to the NHS, symptoms will be noticed many years before that.

These include menstrual changes, acne, low libido, hair loss, fatigue, and mood swings.

Hormone expert Dr. Martin Kinsella says taking time out to relax can be helpful. “To keep your hormones in balance, it’s important to get rid of stress,” he says.

“The habit of taking time for yourself every day – be it a relaxing bath, five minutes of meditation, or a walk – can boost hormone levels and overall health.”

4) SLEEPING APART: “As people age, most people experience less slow-wave sleep – the restful sleep that helps you wake up rested,” says sleep expert Neil Stanley.

“Things often start to go wrong after the age of 40.” One of the most effective ways to fight it? “Sleep in separate bedrooms a few nights a week,” says Neil.

“My research has shown that sleep can often be disturbed by your bed partner, and if you share a standard British-sized double bed, you are likely to have less space than a child.

“Sleeping alone could dramatically improve the quality of your sleep – and even improve your relationship if you are less tired and don’t argue about lack of sleep during the day.”

Neil also recommends limiting alcohol consumption and avoiding food at least three hours before bedtime.

When you have people deviously commenting on your Instagram posts, you become friends with them, says Emma Kenny

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When you have people deviously commenting on your Instagram posts, you become friends with them, says Emma KennyImage credit: Pexels

5) TOXIC FRIENDS: “The people you surround yourself with reflect who you are,” explains psychologist Emma Kenny.

“When you have reached your fifth decade, think about who is good for you in your life.

“It can be hard to say no when you are younger, but as you get older you don’t want to have negative people around you and you should be more confident about being honest with who you want to hang out with.

“When you have people deviously commenting on your Instagram posts, you become friends with them. You will have more positive energy when you have positive people around you.”

6) DO KEGEL EXERCISES: About two-thirds of women over 40 suffer from incontinence *, but it doesn’t have to be an inevitable part of aging, explains Dr. Shirin Lakhani, founder of Elite Aesthetics. “Many things – like childbirth, constipation, overexertion, menopause, and obesity – put stress on the pelvic floor as you get older,” she explains.

The good news is that daily exercise can help. “Lie down or sit in a comfortable position,” says Dr. Lakhani. “Contract your pelvic floor muscles for 3-6 seconds while you exhale.

“When you breathe in again, release the contraction. Fully relax all muscles and repeat. Do this 10 times per session and two to three sessions per day for the best results. “

7) Be Kind to Your Gut: If you treat it right, your gut can “have an extraordinary impact on your health,” says nutritionist Amanda Ursell.

The key is to properly “feed” the good bacteria lurking in your digestive tract with lots of fibrous whole grains, fruits like apples and figs, and vegetables like spinach.

“After” eating “the fiber, they produce compounds that trigger chain reactions that boost mood and the immune system, control appetite, and lower bad cholesterol.

Make every bite count and switch from refined and processed foods to whole grain breads, cereals, pasta, and rice.

You will still need contraception even if your periods are irregular

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You will still need contraception even if your periods are irregular

8) DON’T FORGET THE PILL: You will also need contraception if your period is irregular.

“Many women get perimenopausal symptoms in their early 40s, stop using contraceptives, and some get pregnant,” explains Dr. Kaye.

“If you go through menopause before age 50, you should use contraception for another two years. If you go through it after 50, use contraception for another year. After 55 you can stop.

“We used to say that women over 35 should stop taking the combined pill, but it’s okay to keep going if you don’t have other risk factors for blood clots, like obesity or smoking. There are also many other options for over 40s like the Mirena coil. “

9) CHECK YOUR BREASTS: Research by Breast Cancer Now has found that nearly half of women in the UK do not have their breasts regularly checked for signs of cancer and, worryingly, one in ten women has never had one.

“About 10,000 women under the age of 50 are diagnosed annually in the UK, so it is important that all women make their breasts checked – at least once a month – a lifelong habit,” says Manveet Basra, director of the department public health and welfare of charity.

“The earlier breast cancer is discovered, the more successful the treatment. Verification is quick, easy and there is no specific technique.

“Just get to know your breasts and what is normal for you so you can spot new or unusual changes.”

  • Get a free NHS health check-up – like an MOT – when you’re 40. Call your GP to book!

Source: * Pelviva Dr. Martin Kinsella (Re-enhance.com), Dr. Shirin Lakhani (Elite-aesthetics.co.uk

Model reveals the secret of eternal youth and challenges others to do the same

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This non-profit is closing the gap between women and fertility awareness

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Feminae Vero educates women about the truths of their reproductive health and how it relates to faith.

Mary Kate Knorr did not expect that she would stand up for the unborn child to raise awareness of the fertility of women. But the longer she worked for the cause of life, the more meaningful it made.

“I’ve seen that the pro-life movement hasn’t done enough to address the huge problem we have in our country and around the world with artificial hormonal birth control,” Knorr said in an interview with Aleteia. “That was a big gap for me – and I felt personally called to address it.”

That call led her to found Feminae Vero, a nonprofit dedicated to fertility education and other means of supporting holistic women’s health, with a particular focus on the connection between faith and health. Knorr said “Feminae Vero exists to serve, educate and evangelize girls and women about the truths of their reproductive health and their connection to our Catholic faith.”

Feminae Vero is a new company for Knorr. Her background is in politics and pro-life, and she served for many years as the executive director of Illinois Right to Life. She launched Feminae Vero in January 2021.

Women will find a wide variety of services at Feminae Vero, including the following:

  • Education about fertility
  • Doula services
  • Healing retreats
  • Representation of interests with elected officials and medical professionals

So far, the backbone of their work has been fertility education and it seems that this is the area where the organization can make the greatest impact.

Two projects that are currently in progress are particularly exciting. One of these projects is the creation of a curriculum for middle and high school girls to learn more about their reproductive health and its importance in Catholic education. This curriculum has the potential to be wonderful empowerment and usefulness for girls at an important stage of development.

As Catholics, we know that faith and honest science go hand in hand. ” said Knorr. “It is one facet of our philosophy to go ahead with science to teach girls and women about their bodies and then move on with the truths of faith to ultimately attain evangelization.”

It might seem strange to think that fertility education would lead to evangelization, but Knorr saw a real connection between the two. During her time in the pro-life movement, she made one key observation: “Most of my colleagues who have previously made an election have had a spiritual conversion in addition to their ideological one.” She said.

As they stood up for life, they also became Christians and, in many cases, Catholic. “Abortion is not entirely a logical problem,” said Knorr. “It’s a heart problem too.”

The second project is a curriculum for seminarians and clergy. “A future goal is to develop a program for seminarians and clergy that enables them to better support girls and women from a ministerial point of view”, said Knorr. This project sounds like a critical force for good: sometimes there is a discrepancy between what the church teaches about women’s health and what local clergy understand about that teaching, so this project will help bridge that gap to bridge.

There are many things in the life of modern women that are physically and spiritually toxic. Knorr hopes Feminae Vero will be a refreshingly holistic and positive resource.

“One of my main goals in founding Feminae Vero was to offer women a healing hand.” She said.

There are so many voices in society today who have deeply hurt women by lying to them about their origins and God’s plan for their bodies. Through our healing retreats and the service and education we want to offer women, our goal is to take women by the hand and initiate them into a healing process.

Ultimately, that healing comes from Christ. “It is the Lord who does the healing,” she explains.

That is why we place so much emphasis on evangelization as the primary goal. We believe that when shared with prayer and compassion, the truth leads women to Jesus Christ – and once they meet the Lord, their healing will be inevitable.

Knorr wants women to know that God created them with profound purpose and purpose. “The objectification and abuse of women in our culture is a result of human decline,” she explains, “but the theology of the body of John Paul II tells us that we are meant for more.”

Her goal for Feminae Vero is to help women discover that purpose and intention. She says, “Women can find such immense healing in the arms of Jesus Christ.”

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Task force tackles problems that slow women’s success in workforce | Business News

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Cora Faith Walker, Chief Policy Officer of St. Louis County Executive Dr. Sam Page, speaking at a community meeting on Tuesday. September 14, 2021. She leads the advancement of the District Board’s political priorities by providing an integrated approach to policy development and external engagement.



Childcare. Wage gaps. Education. Health care.

These topics were included during a town hall in Florissant on Tuesday, September 14th, to gather input from local women on topics and factors preventing them from fully participating, moving forward, or being successful among the workforce.

The lunchtime event was organized by United Women’s Empowerment (United WE) and the Missouri Women’s Economic Development Task Force at the city’s Civic Center.

Wendy Doyle, United WE CEO, said the organization is hosting a number of these town halls across the state to provide policy recommendations to leaders and lawmakers that will be sent to them in late 2021.

She said her organization’s goal is to collect the qualitative data from women to link it to quantitative research on working women in Missouri. Some of this data includes statistics such as that 44% of all Missouri counties have no recognized childcare facilities and that of the total Missouri women population, 15.4% are below the poverty line, compared with 12.9% of men. The organization also found that 18% of Missourians living in poverty were under 18 years of age.

Wendy Doyle, United WE CEO, said

“Above all, we wanted to have informed conversations as we approach the pandemic recovery because we know women have been severely affected.” Wendy Doyle, CEO of United WE, called. “And we just want to hear their stories.”

Dawn Gipson, Diversity Director at Centene, spoke during the small group sessions about how the pandemic is doing for their truly enlarged women lifting heavy loads both outside and inside the home. She also noted that people may be scared of going back to work after working from home for over a year.

“So there is this fear of going back to the office, but the focus is on ‘We need to get back to normal,'” she said, noting that women and people of color may not want to interact on a daily basis with people who are not tolerant or respectful of people’s identity.

Cora Faith-Walker lives in Ferguson and is Chief Policy Officer of the St. Louis County Executive’s Office. She agreed with Gipson and said the shutdown was so much more than just a shutdown.

“People think we can just snap our fingers and go back to 2019,” she said, adding that she almost felt like she forgot how to small talk while working remotely Office involved.



Dawn Gipson

Dawn Gipson



Finally, the small groups ended their conversation for a full group discussion that addressed the main barriers encountered during the small discussions: access to affordable childcare; same salary; Access to adequate health care; Access to equity; Teach children at home or help with their virtual education; and try to keep the household together even when working outside the home.

“Above all, we wanted to have informed conversations as we approach the pandemic recovery because we know women have been severely affected,” said Wendy Doyle, CEO of United WE. “And we just want to hear their stories.”

United WE’s November report said that due to the decline in the industry during the COVID-19 pandemic, Missouri could potentially lose 48% of its childcare offering, meaning there is only one place available in a licensed daycare for six children.

Faith-Walker later addressed the challenges faced by the county executive in obtaining pandemic aid to childcare providers.

“Another type of challenge we had with vendors was probably the amount of technical support that was sometimes required to take advantage of opportunities like the PSA programs,” she said.

The organization held two talks before Tuesday – one in Joplin and one in Sedalia. Several others are planned, including October 6 in Kansas City; October 14 in Kirksville; and October 28th, held virtually, and will highlight the needs of women of color.

For more information or to register, visit united-we.org/mo-town-halls.

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