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A Medical Career, at a Cost: Infertility

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From the beginning, Dr. Ariela Marshall, a hematologist at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, believed that if she worked harder, longer, and better, she would be successful. And that’s what she did: she graduated from high school, attended an elite university, and was accepted into a top medical school.

But she missed one achievement: having a baby. She had put the pregnancy off until it was firmly established in her career, but when she finally decided to have children at 34, she was surprised that she couldn’t, even with fertility drugs. Dr. Marshall attributed this to frequent night shifts, as well as stress and lack of sleep, which can affect the reproductive cycle.

When she turned to other doctors to tell her story, she learned that she was nowhere near alone; many women in their jobs have also struggled with infertility or having a baby.

“For many doctors like me, everything is planned that way,” said Dr. Marshall. “Many of us choose to wait until we are finished with our education and financially independent in order to have children, and that doesn’t happen until we are in our mid to late 30s.”

To raise awareness of the problem, Dr. Marshall on establishing an Infertility Task Force with the American Medical Women’s Association. In June, the association held its first national physicians fertility summit, with egg freezing sessions, benefits and insurance coverage for fertility treatments, and infertility and mental health. The association plans to hold another summit next year.

The high rate of infertility also applies to female surgeons. A survey of 692 female surgeons published in JAMA Surgery in July found that 42 percent had suffered a pregnancy loss – more than twice the rate of the general population. Almost half had experienced pregnancy complications.

Like other doctors, many surgeons postpone pregnancy until after their specialist training, which makes them more prone to health problems and infertility problems.

Doctors often have to complete 10 years of medical studies, specialist visits and grants. The median age for women to complete their medical education is 31, and most female doctors give birth for the first time, on average, at 32, according to a study from 2021. The average age for non-doctors is 27 years.

Dr. Marshall with two other doctors who were also struggling with infertility, and last year they wrote about the problem in Academic Medicine magazine, calling for more fertility education and awareness among aspiring doctors, starting with undergraduate degrees. They also suggested providing insurance coverage for and access to fertility testing and management, and providing assistance to people undergoing fertility treatment. (In December, Dr. Marshall gave birth to a healthy boy after completing a successful IVF cycle.)

For a year, Dr. Arghavan Salles, 41, to freeze her eggs, but none were viable. Dr. Salles, author of the article and a Stanford surgeon, is also struggling with the cost of the procedure, which can cost up to $ 15,000 per attempt. She is looking for an intrauterine insemination that is cheaper but has a lower chance of success.

In 2019, she wrote an essay on Time about her most fertile years as a surgeon, only to find it might be too late for her to have a baby. After that, many doctors contacted her and said that they had also dealt with infertility.

“They all felt so alone,” said Dr. Salles. “You’ve all gone through this roller coaster ride of dealing with infertility on your own because people just don’t talk about it. We need to change the culture of medical school and residency. We need to better encourage leaders in this area to say, ‘Please, go and see what you have to do.’ “

Sleep deprivation, poor nutrition and a lack of exercise – the requirements of medical training and the medical profession – challenge women who want to become pregnant.

The search for a partner can also be a challenge in view of the demanding working hours, even at night and on weekends.

“The problem is you have to spend a lot of time in the hospital and it’s very unpredictable,” said Dr. Salles. “You could look back and say, ‘I should have frozen eggs in my early twenties,’ but the technology wasn’t very good then. We see older women who are celebrities on the news having babies and we think it will be okay, but it isn’t. Now we all have the realization that we have no control over our lives. “

Dr. Vineet Arora, dean of medical education at the University of Chicago’s Pritzker School of Medicine and another author on the article, ponders how she and other educators can best advise medical leaders to address these issues.

“What surprised me most is that for many of these women, infertility is a silent struggle, but when you see the data you find that this is not uncommon,” said Dr. Arora, who had many IVF cycles in her 40s, finally had her second child in March last year.

You and Dr. Salles analyze data from a large study they conducted, interviewing doctors and medical students about their experiences with building families and accessing infertility treatments.

Female residents who manage to get pregnant also struggle with poor health outcomes; many go into early labor or miscarriage due to long hours and stress at work. Nevertheless, pregnant female residents are expected to work 28-hour shifts without sleeping. Dr. Arora and others would like to see this change.

Dr. Roberta Gebhard, chair of governance and former president of the American Medical Women’s Association, said the group is advocating more precautions for pregnant doctors to try to have a baby later in their education.

“We train medical students and medical students about fertility problems so they are aware of them,” she said. “People say you can’t be a mother or a doctor, and we tell you you can, but you have to keep your options open. Much of it isn’t just about getting pregnant. Some of these women are so focused on their careers that they do not enter into a relationship. “

Finding the time and private space to express breast milk while at work can even be a challenge for doctors with babies. Dr. Gebhard said a doctor, who asked for time to pump, was instructed to go behind a potted plant in a public area.

She is optimistic that things will change in the near future, as more than 50 percent of all medical students are now women, although there are still more male doctors than women.

Dr. Racquel Carranza-Chahal, 30, recently completed her residency in gynecology and now has her own practice in Tucson, Arizona. She has a son, whom she gave birth to while studying medicine, and a daughter.

“When I became a resident, someone told me that if I wanted a scholarship, I would have to divorce my husband and lose custody of my child,” said Dr. Carranza Chahal.

She was on call the day she spoke and had just completed her second 24-hour shift in seven days.

In 2019, she founded a nonprofit called Mothers in Medicine, which she hopes will increase visibility and publicity for doctors who are pregnant or who are mothers.

“I want mothers in education to know they should take their places, that they belong, and that they have resources available to them, including legal ones,” said Dr. Carranza Chahal. “Many residents give birth too early and have complications. One day I’ll change that. “

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Women’s Health

Holy Cross Women’s Health Institute Meets the Needs of Women in Taos | Health

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SPONSORED / Meeting the health needs of every member of the Taos Family is a challenge that Holy Cross Medical Center continues to work towards. The newborn members of our ward require very different care than our older fellow citizens, and parishioners of different sexes also require different types of care. Many of women’s specific health needs can be met right here in Taos at the Holy Cross Women’s Health Institute.

Women are vital to maintaining healthy families; Not only can they become pregnant and give birth, but they are often caregivers for children and other family members and thus have an overwhelming impact on the larger community in which we live. Women also tend to live longer than men and need medical assistance at many stages of life. It is therefore particularly important that women of all ages have access to high quality medical services. Such superior health services are available to the women of Taos at the Holy Cross Women’s Health Institute.

It is a rarity in these days of hospital consolidation in rural communities that specialized women’s health care – and OB / GYN services in particular – are available locally. Many rural women have to travel an hour or more to get the care they need. Hence, it is particularly noteworthy that the Holy Cross Women’s Health Institute offers the expert care of three gynecologists – Dr. Tim Moore, who has been an obstetrician in Taos since 2007, Dr. Rameet Singh, who joined the practice in 2018, and the newest addition to the medical team, Dr. Carol Kiesling – as well as the care team of the certified midwives, Naomi Hannah and Anna Hüsner.

The Holy Cross Women’s Health Institute’s health care providers strive to ensure the health of every mother in Taos, from prenatal care to pregnancy and childbirth to post-baby care such as breastfeeding advice and family doctor care.

Women’s health care doesn’t stop with pregnancy, of course, and neither do the services of the Holy Cross Women’s Health Institute. Wellness support begins in childhood with caring for adolescent girls and puberty and continues through a woman’s entire life with family planning, breast care – including Holy Cross Medical Center’s new 3D digital mammography services – and support , during and after menopause, including osteoporosis treatment.

The Holy Cross Women’s Health Institute also offers screening for healthy women to care about women’s sexual health, including cervical cancer screening, sexually transmitted infection testing and prevention, and services for other common reproductive disorders such as abnormal bleeding.

Since the health of an individual woman is inextricably linked to her environment, community health is also a focus of the Holy Cross Women’s Health Institute. They provide services to women affected by substance abuse or violence at home, and strive to improve the collective well-being of the Taos community through the health of their women.

Regardless of their age, specific health needs, or stage of life, women in our community can be confident that they will receive excellent, compassionate, and confidential care here in Taos at the Holy Cross Women’s Health Institute.

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Crews break ground on women’s health center at Providence St. Joseph campus – Orange County Register

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A four-story, 137,000 square meter health center for women and babies has laid the foundation stone on the campus of Providence St. Joseph Hospital in Orange.

  • Officials break the ground for the Helen Caloggero Women’s and Family Center at Providence St. Joseph Hospital in Orange, California on Tuesday, September 21, 2021. The four-story, 150,000-square-foot facility provides access to health services, benefits and resources for Orange County’s residents. It is currently scheduled to open in autumn 2023. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Rendering of the Helen Caloggero Women’s and Family Center at Providence St. Joseph Hospital in Orange, Calif., Tuesday, September 21, 2021. The four-story, 137,000-square-foot facility provides access to health services, benefits and resources for Orange County residents. It is currently scheduled to open in autumn 2023. (Courtesy Providence St. Joseph Hospital)

  • Sister Judith Dugan bows her head as the Reverend Kevin Vann blesses the groundbreaking ceremony for the Helen Caloggero Women’s and Family Center at Providence St. Joseph Hospital in Orange, California on Tuesday, September 21, 2021. The four-story, 150,000-square-foot facility will provide Orange County’s residents with access to health services, benefits and resources. It is currently scheduled to open in autumn 2023. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Reverend Kevin Vann prepares to help officials break ground at the Helen Caloggero Women’s and Family Center at Providence St. Joseph Hospital in Orange, Calif. On Tuesday, September 21, 2021. The four-story, 150,000-square-foot facility will provide access to health services, benefits and resources for Orange County’s residents. It is currently scheduled to open in autumn 2023. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Philanthropist Marsh Moeller speaks about her mother Helen Caloggero during a cornerstone ceremony for the Helen Caloggero Women’s and Family Center at Providence St. Joseph Hospital in Orange, Calif. On Tuesday, September 21, 2021. The four-story, 137,000-square-foot facility will be Provide Orange County’s residents with access to health services, benefits and resources. It is currently scheduled to open in autumn 2023. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Officials break the ground for the Helen Caloggero Women’s and Family Center at Providence St. Joseph Hospital in Orange, California on Tuesday, September 21, 2021. The four-story, 150,000-square-foot facility provides access to health services, benefits and resources for Orange County’s residents. It is currently scheduled to open in autumn 2023. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Reverend Kevin Vann prepares to help officials break ground at the Helen Caloggero Women’s and Family Center at Providence St. Joseph Hospital in Orange, Calif. On Tuesday, September 21, 2021. The four-story, 150,000-square-foot facility will provide access to health services, benefits and resources for Orange County’s residents. It is currently scheduled to open in autumn 2023. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

The crews began work on the new facility on Tuesday, which will occupy a space on the corner of Main Street and Stewart Drive. Orange Mayor Mark Murphy, Orange County Supervisor Donald Wagner and Bishop of Orange Rev. Kevin Vann showed their support for the new development at a ceremony on site.

The Helen Caloggero Women and Family Center – named after the mother of a major donor to the project – will streamline services to women and families, hospital officials said, bringing “mother-and-baby services currently available in nine different locations across the hospital.” one “. central location.”

The center offers a variety of women’s health resources, including pelvic health and rehabilitation services, exams for mothers and their babies, mental health services, and a pharmacy.

Part of the facility will also become a new natural birthing center “where women will receive the individual care midwives provide in a home setting,” according to a press release. Food, retail and office space are among other features of the future location.

“We are excited to offer our patients this wide range of services in a beautiful, new and convenient location as it will truly make it easier for them to access our world-class caregivers and the latest innovative technology in one place,” said Michelle Genova , Chief Nursing Officer at Providence St. Joseph Hospital, in the news release.

The center is scheduled to open in 2023. The St. Joseph Hospital Foundation is still raising $ 2.3 million for the new facility.

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Women’s Health

‘Bachelor In Paradise Couples’ Who End Up Together, Per A Matchmaker

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Lots of adorable couples have come and gone this season of Bachelor in Paradise – but which ones are staying here? From Reality Steve’s post-show spoilers to the fans’ incredible super detective skills, there are some popular theories.

But most of these guesses are missing a key factor: chemistry. After all, a couple is only as good as their food-related innuendos (if you look at you, Kenny and Mari).

Amber Kelleher-Andrews is the co-founder and CEO of Kelleher International, one of the largest matchmaking companies in the US, seemed doomed from the start.

Ready to Hear the Cold Hard Truth About Your Favorites? Amber spills it all below:

What’s so different about dating on TV?

“The hard thing about TV is that it’s all very inflated,” explains Amber WH. “The culture of this is that you shouldn’t care about anyone other than yourself and the person you want to be with.”

That would put a strain on everyone’s relationship – but Amber says it’s especially difficult for Paradise candidates because they juggle other factors that don’t come into play in real life. “Kindness is somehow swept under the rug,” she says. “And kindness is one of the most important things you look for in a relationship with someone.”

This applies to both men and women, she adds. “In terms of matchmaking, it’s a word that is used quite a lot: ‘You have to be kind.'”

This season, Amber says she “really felt for the cast” and the tricky dating situations they got into. But overall, she rates the candidates themselves as pretty good matchmakers. “They are banding together, but if I had a choice I would say, ‘Yeah, I would bring the two together. And I would definitely bring these two together,'” she said.

Maurissa Gunn and Riley Christian

Craig SjodinGetty Images

Amber’s judgment? Maurissa and Riley are a great pairing, but she’s not sure if they’re built to last. “I really thought he was so cute with Marissa,” she says. “It will break my heart to see what happens, but I really like her.

Her only red flag is Riley’s laid-back attitude. “I just feel like he’s a little more of a charmer,” says Amber. But guys like that “can turn into good guys,” she added. “I watched him like, ‘Is this his time? Will he be that guy? And he doesn’t have enough camera time to tell me. “So the jury has not yet decided on these two.

Brendan Morais and Pieper James

abcs

Craig SjodinGetty Images

The couple fans love to hate actually have more staying power than you might think. “They seem totally in love with each other,” says Amber. “But the thing is, Brendan is not only assertive, but he’s also out of control of his own emotions. And so he could implode himself.”

“He doesn’t seem to really have his own feelings,” she adds. “Something is wrong with him.” Amber says her real tip was to see how Brendan acted around Natasha. “He couldn’t even be straight with her,” she explains. “I was like, ‘Wait a minute. You’re not even able to say the words you’re thinking.'”

And the future of Brendan and Pieper? “I think he looks cute with Pieper and they have chemistry,” decides Amber.

Joe Amabile and Serena Pitt

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Craig SjodinGetty Images

Let’s get one thing straight, “It’s really clear that he really, really, really likes his ex, Kendall,” says Amber. “And he’s not 100 percent honest, but that’s because he doesn’t really want to stick to Kendall.”

ICYMI, Joe, and Kendall originally split because he wanted her to move to Chicago with him, and she said no. (Fair enough.) But Amber thinks “if she had come” [on Paradise] and said, ‘Listen, I’m in love with you and I want to move to Chicago and give us a real chance,’ “then Joe would have left Serena sooner than Wells Adams can make a cocktail.

“His feelings are real for her, and he could fall in love with her again right in front of Serena,” says Amber. “I really don’t know what’s going to happen to them, I can’t tell – but he really likes them both.” Sounds like the producers focused on the wrong love triangle, if you ask me.

Kenny Braasch and Mari Pepin

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Craig SjodinGetty Images

Kenny and Mari win first place for Paradise’s cutest couple as far as Amber is concerned. Although Kenny got distracted by Demi Burnett in the first few episodes, Amber says, “He seems like a really nice guy and I think he’s probably really ready to settle down. Mari seems like a really suitable partner for him.”

Her age difference of 15 years doesn’t let her upset either: “She’s very grown up,” Amber adds. She thinks Mari is a great partner who shares her feelings with Kenny from the start. “I think there’s a chance these two might actually work,” Amber told WH.

Abigail Heringer and Noah Erb

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Craig SjodinGetty Images

“I love Abigail and Noah,” says Amber. But she really wants these two lovebirds to “have more sparks. They are something of a married couple”. Because of this lack of chemistry, she is “not sure what will happen to these two” (even if they are the butter of each other’s toast).

Becca Kufrin and Thomas Jacobs

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Craig SjodinGetty Images

At first glance, Amber says, Becca and Thomas are actually a pretty cute couple. “I think they make a lot of sense,” she explains. “I think that is Tammy [Ly] suited him strangely. “

Amber adds that Thomas and Becca go well together visually. “When I look at Thomas’ stature, his build, and then all of the women, you think, ‘Okay, it has to be Becca.’ It’s big, it’s statue-like, it’s the Bachelorette. So it makes sense. “

But in terms of relationship, this duo just isn’t built for the long haul. “She can do so much better,” says Amber. “In the end, is that really the guy you’re going to end up with?” So she won’t be surprised if the two split up: “If they get married, I still say it’s not a match until they split up and she says, ‘He cheated on me and he’s an idiot.’ And I would say, ‘There it is!’ “

Sounds like Bachelorette Katie Thurston was right when she warned the other Paradise ladies to stay away from Thomas on Us Weekly.

Tre Cooper and Tahzjuan Hawkins

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Craig SjodinGetty Images

Despite Tahzjuan’s previous affair with Tres uncle, these two actually seemed like a great couple. “It was cute,” says Amber of their brief relationship. “And he was one of my favorites.”

Amber was disappointed that Tahzjuan had dropped her association with Tre as soon as Riley arrived. She also believes the Paradise producers cut out some footage that would have made Tahzjuan’s decision more meaningful. “One night she just screamed on the beach and Tre was kind of outside. And I asked, ‘What actually happened?’ “Says Amber.

Aside from glitches and missed connections, Amber thinks Tre and Tahzjuan should try again. “The two of them should at least meet up when they get home,” she says. (Personally, I fully and completely agree!)

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