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CBD: What is it and will it improve cycling performance?

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CBD, the supplement that seems to be everywhere. It’s found in gels, drinks, chamois cream, and even pizza these days.

CBD is already widespread in rugby, golf and cricket, is taking the sports world by storm and is showing no sign of disappearing. So is CBD the next big thing in cycling? And is it legal?

In April of this year, the UCI Continental Professional Cycling Outift Team Skyline announced a sponsorship deal with the Gold Medal CBD company and Tokyo 2020 has been widely recognized as the first time athletes have been able to use CBD in their preparation for the Olympics.

Former pro and disqualified Tour de France winner Floyd Landis, the CBD company Floyd’s of Leadville, has many elite athletes as ambassadors, including cyclists Sarah Sturm, Gordon Wadsworth and Peter Stetina.

According to Grand View Analysis, the global CBD industry is projected to be worth $ 13.4 billion (£ 9.7 billion) by 2028.

What is CBD?

CBD is a naturally occurring compound found in the cannabis plant and is also known as cannabidiol.

It is one of the hundreds of compounds called cannabinoids that make up the cannabis plant.

It’s neither intoxicating nor psychoactive, unlike one of the plant’s better-known cannabinoids, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis that gets people high.

A report by the World Health Organization (WHO) states that “CBD is generally well tolerated and has a good safety profile”.

Is CBD legal in the UK?

Like ketone esters, CBD is legal in the UK.

CBD products fall under the Novel Food Regulation, which means that they must be marketed as dietary supplements rather than medicinal products.

In 2018, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) removed CBD from its list of banned substances, but other compounds found in the cannabis plant, including THC, are still banned.

Cannabis is a Class B illegal drug in the UK and almost all cannabidiols are controlled substances under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 (excluding CBD).

In what form does CBD occur?

There are three CBD spectra: full, wide, and narrow, which indicates the number of other compounds from the cannabis plant that are present in the CBD itself.

A full spectrum product contains CBD and a small amount of THC (less than 0.2%, otherwise it’s illegal).

A broad spectrum product contains all of the compounds in the plant, including CBD, but does not contain THC.

A narrow spectrum product (also called Isolate CBD) contains only CBD and no other compounds from the cannabis plant.

There are many different types of CBD products, from capsules, oils, patches, balms, and gels to beverages, gums, pillow cases, and even yoga classes.

According to neurologist and medical cannabis expert Professor Mike Barnes, the most effective way to ingest CBD is as an oil under your tongue.

“Most people take CBD as an oil under their tongue because it can be absorbed directly into the bloodstream. Then the effect lasts for about 4-6 hours.

“Basically, it depends on what you want CBD for, how you should take it. For example, if your joints or muscles are sore, you can use a balm to rub the affected area. ‘

What are the potential benefits of CBD for cyclists?

CBD proponents say it can aid post-exercise recovery, improve sleep quality, and reduce anxiety.

“CBD can generally help with anxiety and physical pain,” said Michael Tacci, Sports Director of Team Skyline. “Not only does it help deal with gnawing small injuries, bumps and bruises, but it can also help with pain management on the bike during hard exertion.

“Most importantly, CBD has been anecdotally seen to significantly improve post-exercise recovery.”

Ex-road pro and gravel and endurance cyclist Peter Stetina started using CBD in 2015 after breaking his leg on the Tour of the Basque Country looking for an alternative to prescription painkillers.

For Stetina, the greatest benefit he gets from CBD is improved quality of sleep.

“When I take the capsules around dinner, I feel like I can fall asleep earlier,” he explains. “It helps me to go to bed early before I get up early on a race morning.”

He also uses a CBD cream to help with acute sore muscles after a race.

Notably, Stetina does not use CBD during the competition, but because of the relaxing benefits of the supplement, he notes a smoother recovery afterwards.

“I would definitely recommend CBD to other cyclists,” he says. “The next morning there is no drowsiness, no dire side effects, and it’s a legal substance for drug testing. I would say just start with the lowest dose and work up to what works best for you, just like anything else. ‘

Team Skyline driver Wolfgang Brandl benefits from CBD in two ways.

“It helps me calm down after a race, especially because a lot of our races are usually late in the evening or at night and my legs are less tired even after a few days,” he says.

Brandl first tried CBD in 2019 when he was feeling tired during a 10-day race and a friend told him to try CBD cream. “I used it and my legs felt pretty good. I even got a podium that day.”

Brandl, who is from Germany, adds that CBD use is better known in the US than in Europe.

What to look for in a CBD product

There is a huge range of CBD products to choose from, with 217 CBD companies currently operating in the UK.

Professor Barnes emphasizes the importance of looking for products with clear labeling that shows which cannabinoids are in what percentage and that come from a credible source.

“I think you should look for broadband products with clear labeling, clear dosages that don’t make unnecessary medical claims,” ​​he says.

“Not all CBD supplements are made equally,” says Caroline Glynn, scientific director and co-founder of Pureis CBD. “Some products on the market may contain undesirable impurities in addition to THC levels, and some may contain lower levels of CBD, as indicated on the product label, that are unknown to the average consumer.”

A paper published in April 2020 tested 29 CBD dietary supplements available in the UK market and found that 34% of the products had 50% less of the advertised CBD content and 55% of the products had a measurable THC content above what is considered safe exhibited.

How Much CBD Should I Take?

The UK Food Standards Agency (FSA) recommends consuming no more than 70 milligrams of CBD per day.

For Professor Barnes, however, this is controversial.

“It’s not based on any science,” he says. “I can’t find any evidence that more than 70 milligrams is unsafe and that some people need more than 70 and others less, it is completely different for each individual. I would recommend starting with a low dose like 10 mg and building this up slowly.

Professor Graeme Close of Human Physiology at Liverpool John Moores University emphasizes the importance of exercising caution until further research is done.

“There is not enough evidence for a recommended dose right now, but there is no point going over the FSA limit.

“If you are taking other medications, speak to your doctor before taking CBD and be sure not to ingest stupid amounts.”

Is CBD doping?

Many CBD products on the market contain CBD as well as other cannabinoids, which means this could be problematic for athletes in WADA-sanctioned sports.

“An athlete could be taking a CBD product that contains 0% THC but happens to contain some of the potentially therapeutic non-psychotropic cannabinoids like cannabigerol (CBG) and WADA could choose to test it and the athlete would get one Drug test fail CBG, ”explains Professor Close.

“Unless WADA removes all cannabinoids from their list of prohibited substances or names the specific psychotropic cannabinoids that are banned and tested for, it will be very difficult for an athlete to try CBD safely.”

Close adds that this creates ethical challenges in CBD research, as athletes could be given products that cause them to fail an anti-doping test.

Notably, WADA recently announced that it will resume discussions about removing cannabis from the prohibited list next year.

Debate about THC

While there is general consensus among experts that CBD is not performance enhancing, there is a debate about how much THC can legally be in a product and how effective a product is if all THC is removed.

“Some people have read the legislation to believe that a product should contain less than a milligram of THC, but that is a legislative misunderstanding,” says Professor Close. “My reading of the current legal status is that the final product should not contain any detectable THC.”

“Nobody can tell you if a product is effective because of what is known as the entourage effect when all of the THC has been removed,” he adds. “There is evidence that you need the full spectrum of cannabinoids, even if it’s not very much, for them to all work well in synergy.

“We have to remember that research is miles behind where it probably should be because it has been banned for decades.”

The future of CBD in cycling

Honest Hemp, a CBD company that currently supplies an unnamed bike club, believes interest in CBD is growing and wants to educate people about CBD.

“We are involved in ongoing studies with Hull University to improve and develop our products, and we continue to inform people that CBD does not get you high – as some people wrongly assume – but has a positive effect on recovery. which in turn increases the performance. ”, explains company founder Christian Sanderson.

Professor Barnes predicts that better quality, better labeling and more understanding products will hit the market.

“CBD is not a fad, it’s an industry that will stay and I think it will help athletes in general,” says Barnes.

Professor Close agrees.

“CBD is not going to go away. I’m actually pretty excited to see what this product can do, but I’m also cautious, ”he says. “It’s the most controversial and complicated addition to hit the industry in the last 20 years.”

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Synchronicity Wellness – Boulder Daily Camera

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Synchronicity hemp oil

Hemp oil may seem like a recent trend, but boulder-based synchronicity has been in business for over two decades.

Hemp oil may seem like a recent trend, but boulder-based synchronicity has been in business for over two decades. With products 100% grown and hand-processed right here in Colorado, the company strives to keep it local – and share the profound benefits of full-spectrum hemp oil.

Twenty years in the making, Synchronicity has worked to perfect the only hand-pressed hemp oil on the market. The oil comes directly from patent-pending gold standard crops grown on the banks of the Arkansas River in Colorado.

A gentle hand pressing process leads to the highest quality. “We’re proud to offer the most nutrient-dense, full-spectrum hemp oil on the market that helps people achieve more balance than just CBD alone can provide,” said Andrew Campbell, CEO of Synchronicity. “We have set the standard for the highest quality, full-spectrum hemp oil products that you can find anywhere.”

Tireless innovation
Synchronicity knows the proof lies in the feedback they get from real people on a daily basis: faster recovery, better sleep, and less stress.

“We’re always researching and innovating to improve every step of our process,” says Campbell. “We have put our heart and soul into our patented plant genetics, hand press and patented infusion process so that you can really feel the full effect that your body and mind deserve.”

Your hard work has paid off.

The evidence of this is a bold achievement: most third-party certifications in the industry. “We pride ourselves on our unparalleled list of certifications,” says Campbell. “Synchronicity was founded with a compliance-first approach and continues to be committed to setting standards and making the highest quality hemp products for both people and trading partners.”

NextGen wellness pioneers
With innovation as a constant motivator, Synchronicity recently partnered with the University of Colorado Athletics to further build the future of Colorado – the next generation of nature wellness pioneers. “Synchronicity and CU share a natural and soulful connection with the mission for health and wellbeing,” says Campbell.

CU Athletics’ WHOLE (Wellness Health Optimal Life Experience) approach aims to support and develop student athletes in the fields of academics, sports nutrition, sports training, medical services, mental health, and leadership and career development. Synchronicity’s innovative products support this mission.

“Our partnership helps CU Athletics continue to provide a holistic, premium experience for student athletes in all sports,” said Campbell. “As a Colorado-based company on a mission to advance wellbeing, we are excited to partner with CU Athletics. Working with an organization that shares our values ​​and our passion for innovation and leadership is of the utmost importance to us. “

CBD vs. hemp?
One of Synchronicity’s most important training points is explaining the difference between CBD and hemp. It can be confusing.

However, Campbell says it’s a simple science: “A hemp plant is loaded with dozens of cannabinoids, terpenes, bioflavonoids, omegas, nutrients and minerals that work together to get the full benefits of pain relief, muscle regeneration, better sleep, anxiety relief, and more. “

Synchronicity has shaped the True Entourage Effect ™: To give the body the power of the whole plant – exactly as nature intended. “CBD is just a compound that has been isolated and extracted from the hemp plant, away from all of its sister elements,” says Campbell. “This reduces the full and natural strength of the plant. As the saying goes: ‘The whole is more than the sum of its parts.’ “

Popular categories: pain, sleep, stress, skin care

Since the entire plant produces the True Entourage Effect ™, it follows that hemp oil can have a wide range of uses. “Because full-spectrum hemp oil interacts directly with and balances the body’s complex and far-reaching endocannabinoid system, there are seemingly endless reasons why people choose to ingest hemp oil,” says Campbell. “Simply put, our plants help the body reduce inflammation and balance this system, which is why this plant has so many different benefits.”

There are many reasons people turn to Synchronicity products, but the most sought-after ones right now are relief from pain, sleep, stress, and skin care issues. “Our line of products is tailored to meet individual needs and an active lifestyle 24 hours a day,” explains Campbell.

A wide range of topical and ingestible products – including a helpful test kit option – offer consumers a variety of ways to find out which method of administration is best for their body. This is important, says Campbell, “because hemp oil is definitely not a universal product.”

Synchronicity constantly educates and informs about the best way to personalize its hemp products by following the work of Synchronicity President Dr. Steven Kraus shares, who has been successfully treating patients in his own practice for over three decades. Consumers can find scientific and educational articles on the Synchronicity blog.

“Our goal is to better inform everyone about the right dosage, products, methods and history related to hemp,” says Dr. Kraus. “And since every human body is different, our approach is simple: we ask our consumers the right questions, listen to their needs and make suggestions based on our many years of experience and expertise.”

In fact, the company offers free 30-minute consultations with hemp experts that can be arranged directly through the website.

What’s next?
So what do you do with a company that is already a leader in its category? Deeper.

“Our goal is to educate and strengthen every single person who crosses our path with knowledge and awareness of the life-changing benefits of hand-pressed full-spectrum hemp oil and its ability to harmonize mind and body.”

It’s all part of a larger movement that gives people the ability to heal themselves naturally rather than using chemicals and drugs, Campbell explains. “We hope that we will offer support and lead people away from harmful chemicals – and back into a healthy relationship with nature.”

More information is available at www.synchronicityhempoil.com.

Photos courtesy of Synchronicity Hemp Oil

Synchronicity hemp oil

Synchronicity hemp oil

A wide range of topical and ingestible products – including a helpful test kit option – offer consumers a variety of ways to find out which method of administration is best for their body.

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CBD for Vertigo: Research and Side Effects

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It can be unsettling to experience dizziness, a feeling that the world is spinning around you. Severe dizziness can even affect your ability to complete everyday tasks as it upsets your balance. Something as harmless as standing up too quickly can make you dizzy due to a rapid drop in blood pressure.

However, dizziness is not a requirement. Instead, it’s a symptom. It can occur due to underlying conditions like multiple sclerosis or problems with the inner ear. Certain medications can also make you feel dizzy.

Treatment for dizziness depends on the cause. You might be interested in home remedies or even natural substances like cannabidiol (CBD).

In this article, we take a closer look at CBD, whether it can help with dizziness and possible side effects. We will also review dizziness treatments and report on when to see a doctor for dizziness.

CBD comes from the cannabis plant. It has several potential health benefits, including insomnia and pain relief.

CBD is similar to another cannabinoid called tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), but it doesn’t produce the same “high” THC.

You can find CBD in many forms, including:

People looking for a full body effect to relieve conditions like chronic pain and insomnia should stick to ingested products like oils, gums, and capsules. Topicals are a better option for targeted pain such as joint pain.

There are also several types of CBD:

  • Isolate. This is pure CBD and contains only CBD.
  • Broad spectrum. Broad-spectrum CBD contains some cannabis compounds (like other cannabinoids) but no THC.
  • The whole spectrum. Full-spectrum CBD contains some THC (less than 0.3 percent for federally legal products) and countless other cannabis plant compounds such as terpenes, flavonoids, and other cannabinoids.

Research suggests that CBD works better when combined with THC, which is why a full-spectrum product is more beneficial than an isolate. This is known as the entourage effect.

However, if you want to avoid THC, you would be better off with an isolate or broad spectrum product. Note, however, that any type of CBD can contain traces of THC, which can be detected in a drug test.

CBD is unlikely to help with dizziness. However, it can help with related symptoms like nausea.

Animal studies from 2016 showed that CBD reduced nausea in rats, while human studies in people undergoing chemotherapy showed that a combination of CBD and THC can help with treatment-related nausea.

Still, the available research on CBD and nausea focuses primarily on chemotherapy-related nausea rather than vertigo-related nausea.

If you are dizzy, it is possible that CBD will make you feel dizzy. Some research on cannabis (including THC and CBD) suggests dizziness as a side effect.

Another 2020 study of people undergoing chemotherapy found that although THC and CBD worked together to reduce nausea and vomiting, 31 percent of participants experienced moderate or severe dizziness, disorientation, or sedation.

There is also research that CBD can lower blood pressure, which could potentially make dizziness worse.

A 2017 study found that participants who took 600 mg of CBD had lower blood pressure than the placebo group. However, the study was very small with only nine male participants.

The World Health Organization believes it is safe to take CBD. But it is possible to experience mild side effects like:

  • Appetite changes
  • Weight changes
  • fatigue
  • diarrhea

Despite the short list of side effects, it is important to speak to your doctor if you are on any medication and consider taking CBD. It is possible for CBD to interact with certain drugs, such as those with a grapefruit warning on them.

While the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) sends warning letters to CBD brands that misrepresent or mislabel their products, the organization does not regulate CBD products in the same way as prescription drugs.

This means that not all CBD products are safe to consume as they may not contain what the label says.

A 2021 study that looked at poison control center cases between 2019 and 2020 found that reports of products containing CBD were on the rise. Reported side effects from these cases are dizziness, dizziness, and nausea. Researchers suggested that this surge could have something to do with inaccurate or fraudulent labeling of CBD products.

For this reason, when choosing CBD, it is important to contact a company that has products tested by a reputable third-party laboratory and provides up-to-date Certificates of Analysis (COAs).

Treatment for dizziness typically depends on the underlying medical condition that is causing the dizziness. For example, if medication is causing your dizziness, your doctor may recommend a different one.

Treatment also depends on the type of vertigo you have.

  • Peripheral vertigo. Peripheral vertigo is caused by a problem with your inner ear that is responsible for your balance.
  • Central vertigo. Central vertigo affects your brain.

Depending on the type and cause, your doctor may recommend the following:

  • Drugs for acute dizziness
  • Exercise or physical therapy to improve balance (for people with permanent inner ear diseases)
  • Avoid dizziness triggers
  • surgical treatment (only as a last resort)

In people with benign positional vertigo, twisting the head (like the Epley Maneuver) can help reposition calcium deposits that can cause problems in the inner ear.

It’s time to see a doctor for dizziness if:

  • does not go away
  • happens frequently
  • happens with other symptoms, such as:
    • Loss of consciousness
    • Vision problems
    • fever
    • Tingling or weakness in your body
    • slurred speech
    • Trouble walking
    • Chest pain

There is no evidence that CBD can help with dizziness. In fact, it can make dizziness worse in some people.

If you have frequent attacks of dizziness, you should speak to your doctor. It can be a sign of an underlying condition that needs treatment.

Is CBD Legal? Hemp-derived CBD products (containing less than 0.3 percent THC) are legal at the federal level, but are still illegal under some state laws. CBD products derived from marijuana are illegal at the federal level, but legal under some state laws. Find out about the laws of your state and wherever you travel. Keep in mind that over-the-counter CBD products are not FDA approved and may be inaccurately labeled.

Steph Coelho is a freelance writer with chronic migraines with a particular interest in health and wellness. If she’s not clicking on her keyboard, she’s probably stuck in a good book.

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Lung Cancer Shrinks in Patient Using CBD Oil

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One case report describes the dramatic shrinkage of a tumor to a quarter of its original size in a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient who refused conventional treatment, continued smoking, and later revealed that she was taking cannabidiol (CBD.) Oil.

The patient was an 80 year old woman.

At diagnosis, the tumor measured 41 mm and there was no evidence of local or further spread. Therefore, it was suitable for a standard treatment regimen consisting of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy, the authors note.

The patient refused conventional treatment. She was monitored every 3-6 months with regular CT scans.

After 2.5 years, the CT scans showed that the tumor had shrunk to 10 mm.

The patient then announced that she had taken CBD oil, which was suggested by a family member. It was taken orally about two to three times a day.

Details of the case were published in BMJ Case Reports on October 14th.

“We are aware of the limitations of this case report,” write the authors, directed by Kah Ling Liew, MD, of Watford General Hospital, Watford, UK.

“Although there appears to be a link between ‘CBD oil’ ingestion and the observed tumor regression, we cannot conclusively confirm that tumor regression was due to the patient’s ingestion of ‘CBD oil’,” they comment.

The team also notes that there are similar case reports in the medical literature.

Both points were highlighted by experts who responded to the publication via the UK Science Media Center.

“This is one of many promising individual case reports of medical cannabis self-treatment in various cancers,” said David Nutt, DM, FRCP, FRCPsych, Edmond J. Safra Chair in Neuropsychopharmacology, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. “Such case reports are biologically credible given the adaptogenic nature of the endocannabinoid system.”

He noted that “a case report alone is not enough to prove that one caused the other – we need studies for that. There are already some controlled studies out there and more are needed to understand the potential of medicinal cannabis in a number of cancers. “

Another expert, Edzard Ernst, MD, PhD, Professor Emeritus of Complementary Medicine, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK, pointed out that cannabinoids have reduced the size of prostate cancer tumors in animal models. “Previous case reports have shown encouraging results in human cancers as well,” he noted. He also said that more studies are needed.

“Case reports cannot be considered reliable evidence, and there is currently no data from rigorous clinical studies to suggest that cannabis products alter the natural course of cancer,” Ernst said.

Patient declined recommended treatment

The patient initially presented with a persistent cough that did not heal with antibiotic therapy. She has a history of mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, osteoarthritis, and high blood pressure. She is a current smoker with a 68 year history of smoking. She has no history of alcohol consumption and is taking several prescription drugs.

After an initial CT examination, she was given a CT-guided lung biopsy and diagnosed with NSCLC (TNM stage T2bN0Mx). Further analysis of the tumor tissue showed that it was negative for ALK and EGFR mutations. PDL1 was expressed by <1% of the tumor cells. No distant metastases were found.

A subsequent CT scan showed that the main tumor in the right median lobe had shrunk from 41 mm to 33 mm. There were new bilateral nodules in the upper lobe, one in the left apex measuring 4 mm and one in the right apex measuring 6 mm.

The patient was referred to a cardiothoracic surgeon for a possible lobectomy, but the surgeon refused to undergo surgery. She was then referred to the oncologists. She underwent repeated CT and positron emission tomography (PET) scans, which showed that her cancer had further shrunk. The CT showed a reduction of 11 mm and the PET a reduction of 18 mm. The left apical knot had resolved and the right superior lobe knot was reduced in size.

The patient was offered stereotactic ablative radiation therapy, which she refused. Since she had refused all standard therapies, it was decided to “watch and wait”. The patient was subjected to regular CT monitoring.

The tumor continued to regress over the course of 2.5 years. By February 2021, it had shrunk to 10mm, an overall reduction of 76% of the maximum axial diameter. The average reduction rate during the observation period was 2.4% per month.

“This case was brought to the attention of the local pulmonary MDT [multidisciplinary team] in February 2019 when serial imaging showed a reduction in tumor size despite not receiving conventional treatment for her lung cancer, “the authors write.

The patient was contacted to discuss her results. She announced that she was using CBD oil and had started taking it in August 2018. No changes were made to her prescription medication, diet, or lifestyle, and she continued to smoke a pack of cigarettes each week.

“I wasn’t very interested in traditional cancer treatments,” said the patient, “because I was concerned about the risks of surgery and I saw my late husband suffer from the side effects of radiation therapy. My relative suggested that I try cannabidiol should (CBD) oil “to treat my cancer, and I’ve been taking it regularly ever since. I am overjoyed that my cancer is shrinking, which I think was caused by the “CBD oil”. I can take it very well and I intend to do this treatment indefinitely. “

The source of the CBD oil was outside of the UK. According to their supplier, the main active ingredients were Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) with 19.5%, CBD with 20.05% and tetrahydrocannabinolic acid with 23.8%.

“The product this patient was using was reported to be high in THC (the intoxicating component of cannabis) and from outside the UK,” commented Tom Freeman, PhD, Senior Lecturer and Director, Addiction and Mental Health Group, University of Bath. Bath, UK. “This type of product is very different from most CBD oils, which contain mostly CBD. Unlike prescription drugs, CBD wellness products lack guarantees of quality, safety, or effectiveness and should not be used for medicinal purposes. “

The authors have not disclosed any relevant financial relationships. Nutt chairs the scientific committee of the Drug Science charity, which receives unrestricted educational grants from some medical cannabis companies. Ernst and Freeman have not disclosed any relevant financial relationships.

BMJ Case Rep. 2021; 14: e244195. Full text

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