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Recipes to Celebrate the History and Culture

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The organized celebrations for Indigenous Peoples Day can be traced back to the early 1990s, around the 500th anniversary of the arrival of Christopher Columbus in America. Before that date, local and international groups began to discuss an alternative to celebrating Columbus Day – to focus on promoting unity and liberation through the violence of the Columbus expedition and colonization.

Since the first official celebrations in South Dakota and Berkeley, California, cities and states in the United States have introduced Indigenous Peoples Day as an official holiday that coincides with or in place of Columbus Day. On October 8, 2021, President Joe Biden became the first President to officially recognize the holiday, which is scheduled to be observed on Monday, October 11, 2021.

The proclamation comes at a time when the visibility of indigenous peoples’ struggles is perhaps the highest in a long time: the letter mentions the disproportionate damage that Native American communities have suffered from COVID-19 despite reaching high levels of vaccination Counting. And in late June this year, hundreds of mass graves were uncovered near a former indigenous school in Canada, uncovering a history of the widespread, forced family separation that indigenous families across North America have been exposed to for more than 100 years.

The proclamation also affirmed not only the federal government’s ongoing treaties with sovereign tribal nations, but also the government’s commitment to invest in the future of indigenous communities.

The vegetable origin of local foods

Indigenous cuisine has its roots in the ancestral ingredients provided by the local land. This sometimes includes meat and fish, but also mainly grains, roots, herbs, fruits and vegetables from North America. Corn, wild rice, pumpkin, tomatoes, beans and potatoes play an important role in many local dishes.

Because food is so closely related to the place, celebrating indigenous peoples through food also means recognizing the land you occupy. Sites like Native-Land.ca can show you whose land you live on and what contracts are still in place today.

“The contracts belong to the tribes and everyone who lives in the land they are discussing,” says Chef Brit Reed. “Learn to be good stewards of the land – tribes have the original instructions on how to look after the land.”

The most important thing about Indigenous Peoples Day is that every day is Indigenous Peoples Day.

Chef Brit Reed

Many chefs acknowledge that accessing ancestral ingredients can be challenging. Food insecurity is a problem in all indigenous communities, and there are many members of all nations who have had to leave tribal areas, whether through forced migration or for other reasons.

On the Well For Culture blog, founders Chelsey Luger and Thosh Collins talk about ways to reclaim local food despite the challenges that might stand in the way. This includes mimicking the servings, meal times, and micronutrient profiles of ancestral meals, as well as a cultural practice of connecting with your food by showing gratitude and eating mindfully.

It’s also important to know how indigenous dishes have evolved over time, often in such a way that they are less healthy. The work of Chef Brian Yazzie, who cares for the elders of his ward during the COVID-19 pandemic, has exposed yet another health crisis: 1 in 3 members of the Navajo nation Yazzie grew up in has diabetes or prediabetes. Many attribute this problem, at least in part, to the number of ingredients such as beef and lard that were introduced into the Native American diet during colonization. Removing some of these ingredients and focusing on what the land provided before the arrival of European settlers can help make dishes more accessible to vegan diners.

3 plant-based recipes to celebrate indigenous peoples day

Banana Bread (Choctaw)

“The most important thing about Indigenous Peoples Day is that every day is Indigenous Peoples Day,” says Chef Brit Reed, whose family the Choctaw traditions brought her to learn traditional foods and medicines, which eventually led to their collaboration -The formation of the food sovereignty group is tribal sovereignty.

A common food item for the Choctaw nation is banaha, a staple of the Choctaw diet that remains a traditional favorite.

Banana Bread (Choctaw)

ingredients

  • 1 bag Corn husks

  • 4 cups Bow & Arrow cornmeal

  • 1 1/2 cup Beans or peas

  • 1 tablespoon Wood ash

  • 1 teaspoon salt

  • hot water

preparation

  1. 1

    Fill both pots with water, cover with lids and bring to a boil. After cooking, place the corn husks in one of the pots and let them become malleable.

  2. 2

    At the same time, in a large mixing bowl, add cornmeal, beans or peas, wood ash and salt. Slowly add the hot water and mix. You want the consistency of the dough to be like plasticine.

  3. 3rd

    Once the bowls are malleable, take the pot off the stove and take it to your prep area. Take some corn husks, tear them into long strips, and put them back in the hot water.

  4. 4th

    Use tongs to remove the shells from the hot water while you are making the dough balls, and adjust the dough balls to the size of the respective bowls while the dough is still hot. Pro tip: Put on two layers of rubber gloves to protect your hand from the heat while you shape the dough balls.

  5. 5

    Wrap corn husks around the dough balls so that they look like a package. Use corn husk strips to tie a knot around each banaha packet to secure the husk around the dough.

  6. 6th

    Put the banaha in the other pot of boiling water and cook for 40 minutes. After 40 minutes, remove from the pot and drain the banaha. Serve with pashofa, tanchi labona or any other traditional soup.

Recipe notes

Some heavy duty equipment is essential for this recipe, including 2 large pots, large heavy duty tongs, large mixing bowl, and rubber gloves.

Blue corn porridge (Navajo)

Alana Yazzie, who blogs as The Fancy Navajo, shares this recipe with happy memories of the purchase as she waited for the Northern Navajo Nation Fair parade to start each year.

“I really love this recipe. It’s so quick and easy to make and contains lots of nutritious ingredients. ”While Yazzie prefers to eat the dish sweet and top it with honey, almonds and raspberries, she finds that her husband prefers a savory version with salt and butter, while others prefer it Add soups.

Get the recipe here.

Three sisters dish (Diné)

Brian Yazzie, a dine chef from Dennehotso, Arizona, in the northeastern part of the Navajo Nation, lives in Saint Paul, Minnesota and is known for applying modern techniques to hyperlocal indigenous ingredients and ancient recipes. Corn is a vital ingredient for the cook.

“Corn is our main ingredient. Not only do we eat it, but it has ceremonial practices behind it, ”Yazzie told Twin Cities PBS. His recipe for the Three Sisters Dish energizes the local Trinity ingredients pumpkin, beans and corn.

Get the recipe here.

About the author

Michelle Eigenheer is a journalist and podcast producer who writes on food, agriculture, and the South. Her work has appeared in Business Insider, Vice, Salon, Southerly Magazine, and others.

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Healthy Eating

5 Ways to Make Costco Bakery Items Healthier, According to a Dietitian — Eat This Not That

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Costco’s bakery is, let’s face it, maybe the best part of the shop. It’s filled to the brim with delicious treats like cookies, muffins, cakes, and more. But if you’re trying to eat healthy, the Costco Bakery can be a total calorie and sugar bomb. But instead of avoiding the bakery entirely, treat yourself to the occasional opportunity to pamper yourself. Moderation is the key!

But more than moderation, there are other ways you can snap up those baked goods without feeling like you’ve tossed your healthy diet out the window. Kacie Barnes, MCN, RDN, Dallas-based nutritionist from mamaknowsnutrition.com has some pointers on how to do just that so you can have and eat your Costco cake too.

Related: The Costco Deli just brought these 3 comfort meals back to camp

Shutterstock

Instead of getting your entire meal from the bakery, Barnes suggests eating it with protein, fruits, and vegetables so that you can have a more balanced meal.

“If you want a baked good for breakfast, add milk to your coffee for some protein, or have a hard-boiled egg as a side dish and some fruit,” she says. “It keeps you full longer and the fruit provides fiber that is normally missing in baked goods.”

Costco bakeryShutterstock

When you know you want to eat something tasty, you may think that saving your calories earlier in the day to splurge on later is the way to go. Barnes cautions against it, however, as it increases the likelihood of splurging too much.

“If you withdraw earlier in the day, you’re more likely to go overboard and eat more while eating the baked goods than if you really refueled all day,” says Barnes. Instead, eat your normal day and enjoy the baked goods as an occasional treat.

Related: To get the latest Costco news straight to your email inbox every day, sign up for our newsletter!

Costco bakeryShutterstock

Indulging in this baker’s treat make sure you eat it slower and really enjoy it. Remove all distractions while eating and focus on what you put in your mouth. Thoroughly enjoying your food can help you remain more satisfied after you eat it, which can encourage you not to overeat.

“If you’re distracted, watching a screen, driving a car, and so on, you won’t even feel like you’ve eaten, let alone satisfied by the experience,” notes Barnes.

Shelves and selections at Costco BakeryShutterstock

It can be easy and tempting to go to the Costco bakery and get the candy right away, but all of Costco’s baked goods are delicious. If you can’t resist a visit to the bakery on your way to the warehouse, look for the slightly healthier items.

Barnes suggests a sprouted grain if your Costco has something like this in stock. (Costs can vary, so you’ll need to see what your store has.) She recommends at least one type of bread to avoid: sourdough.

“There is a myth that sourdough bread is a good source of probiotics, but they actually don’t survive the baking process,” she shares. Plus, the refined flour in this bread isn’t always the best option, she points out. Refined carbohydrates are low in fiber and have been linked to weight gain. So if health is your thing, sourdough is probably not for you.

Related: I’ve tried the Costco chicken nuggets that “taste like chick-fil-A” and I have some thoughts.

Costco bakeryShutterstock

In case you didn’t know, many of Costco’s baked goods are actually multiple servings. The giant muffin is not intended to be consumed in one sitting. You could go a step further and cut your muffins or cookies into smaller portions so that you have control over how many calories, fat, and grams of sugar you are eating.

In this way, you can still treat yourself to a treat without going overboard. Barnes even suggested adding a nut butter to your muffin serving for a protein boost and some healthy fats.

For more information on what is going on in the warehouse near you, see:

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Healthy Eating

Delish and Dash Unveil New Kitchen Line, Offering Style and Convenience for Foodies Everywhere | National News

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NEW YORK, October 25, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Healthy Living Kitchen Brand Hyphen, In a relationship with Delish—The destination for recipes, videos and the latest food news that inspire people to cook – has brought new innovative kitchen utensils onto the market in time for the upcoming Christmas season.

Developed in a deal brokered by IMG, the Delish by Dash collection includes three new products that combine style and convenience, from compact worktop waffle irons and donut makers to lightweight cast iron pans.

The collection:

  • Waffle maker: These 2.5 “diameter waffles cook up to 9 at a time and are perfect for snacking, making mini-desserts, and more. To cook, simply add the batter and the waffles will turn golden brown and can in less than 3 minutes will be served with your favorite toppings.
  • Donut maker: This donut maker cooks up to 7 bakery-fresh 3 “donuts at once, making the perfect breakfast treat or fun decorating project. When done, use non-stick wipes for easy and quick cleaning.
  • Light cast iron pans: Available in 8 “, 10” and 12 “sizes, these versatile, easy-to-use pans are a great, lighter weight alternative to traditional cast iron. With a sturdy stainless steel handle and durable construction, they are easy to move and practical for everyday cooking Pancakes to pasta etc. Each package also contains one QR code with exclusive Delish by Dash recipes.

This is Delish’s second collaborative product drop in partnership with Dash, after the Delish by Dash Stand Mixer debuted last fall.

“Healthy cooking should be fun and easy for everyone. That’s why we partnered with Dash, which often shakes the industry up by exemplifying how healthy eating doesn’t have to break the bank, ”says Joanna Saltz, Editor-in-Chief of Delish. “Following the success of the collaborative kitchen line’s debut last year, we’re excited to offer a brand new range of kitchen must-haves that simplify the cooking process while adding a colorful, playful personality to any home.”

The new Delish from Dash Waffle Bite Maker and Donut Maker will be available on bydash.com, Macy’s and Kohl’s, while the new lightweight cast iron pans in all sizes can be found on bydash.com and Amazon. These new products also come with Delish by Dash recipe books filled with special recipes tailored to each product.

“The beauty and ease of Delish by Dash is that both companies share a common passion to deliver quality kitchen appliances that not only look good, but also reflect our belief that the path to wellbeing begins in the kitchen,” added added Evan Dash, StoreBound Founder and CEO. “Through our continued partnership, we are determined to make today’s home cooking process more enjoyable than ever to suit everyone – from families juggling multiple responsibilities to individuals looking to their next home or home adventure Get involved in van life, Delish by Dash offers all the chance to channel personal style without restricting accessibility. “

Dash is one of a number of brands developed and produced by StoreBound. The brand is committed to creating a healthier lifestyle for everyone by creating products that make it easier for people to prepare food at home.

To keep up to date, visit www.bydash.com and keep following Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

About Delish

Celebrating easy ways to bring the fun of eating into everyday life, Delish.com is the destination for recipes, videos, and the latest food news that people love to cook. Delish is the fastest growing food media brand on the internet with more than 41 million unique monthly visitors and 5 billion video views per year. From implementing their delicious recipes to checking out the hottest trends, the site’s popular short videos can get up to 11 million views in just 24 hours, and favorites have been shared hundreds of thousands of times. Delish has a wide range of exciting content covering the food and beverage industry, making the website a go-to place for people who love food. Delish.com is published by Hearst Magazines, a unit of Hearst, a leading global, diversified media, information and services company. Hearst Magazines’ print and digital assets reach nearly 166 million readers and website visitors every month – 67% of all millennials and 58% of all Gen Z ages 18+ (Source: 2020 comScore Multi-Platform © MRI-Simmons (12- 20.) / S20) With more than 25 brands in the US, the company publishes nearly 250 magazine issues and 200 websites worldwide.

About Dash

Dash is committed to helping people prepare healthy, unprocessed foods at home. The brand is built on the belief that taking small steps every day can make a big difference, and that the best path to wellbeing is to eat whole, natural foods. In store, in the kitchen and online, Dash provides the tools and content to help consumers prepare delicious healthy meals. That’s what raw life is all about.

About StoreBound

StoreBound is a family of brands committed to innovation. With a fully integrated model of concept development, engineering, manufacturing, logistics, sales, marketing and corporate governance, StoreBound develops quality products and manages their performance at major retailers. With thoughtful, well-designed household and housewares products, StoreBound’s goal is to win the hearts of our customers around the world.

About IMG

IMG is a global leader in sports, fashion, events and media. The company manages some of the greatest athletes and fashion icons in the world; owns and operates hundreds of live events annually; and is a leading independent producer and distributor of sports and entertainment media. IMG also specializes in licensing, sports training and league development. IMG is a subsidiary of Endeavor, a global entertainment, sports, and content company.

Media contacts

Christina Panta / cpanta@golin.com

Zoda Carey / zoda@storebound.com

View original content to download multimedia: https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/delish-and-dash-unveil-new-kitchen-line-offering-style-and-convenience-for-foodies-everywhere-301407151 .html

SOURCE StoreBound

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Healthy eating, student living, and meal ideas

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As a student with a busy schedule, eating well proportioned meals is not often prioritized. Studies show that many Canadians develop “inappropriate” eating habits in post-secondary education. While it is tempting to order your favorite “Mickey D’s” dish from UberEats and have it delivered in minutes, introducing some healthier eating options within your week can lead to both academic and physical benefits.

Ordering from fast food restaurants shouldn’t be embarrassed; everyone does it. However, taking time to eat some healthier meals during your week will give you more energy, support cognitive functions, and lead to an overall healthier lifestyle.

While I’m not a food expert or nutritionist, here are a few things I do and meals I enjoy that help balance my diet.

To have breakfest: As students, most of us have been in positions where we had to choose between having breakfast or showing up for class, and we often choose the latter.

But breakfast helps with energy intake and awareness. In a study by the US National Library of Medicine, researchers found that eating breakfast was linked to higher academic achievement.

There are many simple breakfast items that work well with time sensitive schedules. These include toast with avocado, oatmeal, berries, bananas with peanut butter, granola and yogurt, and trail mix. Foods high in fiber and protein are best in the morning and will give you the energy boost you need to start the day.

Avoid eating before bed: Many experts suggest that you should finish your last meal around three to four hours before bedtime. Since Covid-19 has changed most of our class schedules, this has become difficult for many students. A study conducted by researchers from the University of Saskatchewan suggests that the isolation caused by Covid-19 has resulted in a significant deterioration in the eating habits of a typical university student, including eating late at night.

Since everyone’s schedules are constantly adjusting, a balanced dinner isn’t often the foreground of our thinking. Personally, I sometimes prefer to have a few snacks throughout the day and eat spaghetti squash noodles with pesto or tomato sauce for a meal around 7pm.

Whatever your schedule, it’s important to give yourself enough time to digest.

Have snacks: Many associate snacking with unnecessary ingestion of food or eating out of boredom. According to Healthline Media, “research shows that certain foods can be particularly important for brain health and mental performance.” These foods include berries, dark chocolate, nuts, eggs, avocados, and citrus fruits – all super simple and enjoyable snacks.

Healthy snacks distributed throughout the day can increase your brain’s ability to concentrate, reduce food cravings and enable you to “eat on the go” at particularly busy times. It enables the reduction of gas and unwanted exhaustion after eating.
For more information on healthy eating, UTM offers free nutritional advice with registered nutritionists. To make an appointment, call (905) 828-5255 or visit the Health and Advice Center (HCC) website. Not only does the HCC allow students to create plans for their specific nutritional needs, but it also has some delicious recipes for busy schedules to try out at home!

Theater Erindale Correspondent (Volume 48)
Julia is in her fourth year of majoring and minor in English, drama and professional writing and communication. Last year she had the pleasure of writing articles for The Medium’s arts and entertainment division. When Julia is not writing or watching Netflix, she can be singing with her guitar, playing board games, headbanging to her favorite music or sipping iced coffee on a terrace. She recently published her poem “Stretch Marks” in issue 2 of Wandering Autumn Magazine. You can connect with Julia on Instagram or Facebook.

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