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Women’s Health

Football team rules, culture have ongoing issues

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Since an August 2020 investigation by USA TODAY Sports and The Intercollegiate resulted in the firing of Texas Tech’s women’s basketball coach and the forced resignation of its softball coach next month, the school has taken numerous steps “to provide physical and mental support support”. The health and well-being of its students, including student-athletes, ”said a report from a law firm hired by the school to conduct a review of the athletics department.

However, the report, released late Wednesday afternoon after more than a year of work, also found persistent issues, including specific issues with the soccer, women’s basketball and men’s golf teams.

►In soccer: Based on a review of the specific rules of various Texas Tech teams for the 2020-21 and 2021-22 school years, the Holland & Knight report states that the soccer team’s rules include a “Date Rape and” “Social Policies” That Should Be Carefully Checked And Edited “by the school’s Title IX office, as well as” outdated and troubling language “about how players should deal with team issues.

► In a section on diversity and inclusion, the report also states: “In surveys at the end of the year, a soccer student-athlete used the derogatory term ‘no homo’ in his comments on the end of the season in athletics, which clearly indicated that he was fine about to use the term within athletics. Football was the only program where staff and student athletes stated that student athletes would not feel safe sharing their LGBTQIA status. “

►For women’s basketball: According to the report, the team rules “impose one-year curfews without reference to team travel or preparation for competitions, forbid the players from having guests in their apartments after the curfew, and stipulate that members of the coaching staff may carry out random exit checks in player apartments. ”

►In men’s golf and soccer: The report found team rules in effect in 2020-21 “described conditioning penalties for failing to meet certain team expectations and inconsistent with track and field guidelines or the NCAA medical recommendations that” never Should do sport ”. be used for punitive purposes ”in athletics.

In addition, the report states that these rules “also contradicted statements made by medical and strength and conditioning personnel in interviews that Texas Tech does not allow physical punishment.” The report said the company found it was “under supervision of the punishment assigned to a younger member of the strength and conditioning staff in at least one case.”

The report said that Athletics Director Kirby Hocutt stated that the two teams’ rules no longer include those provisions.

The report details the changes and educational efforts the school is making in areas such as the ability of athletes to report problems, athletics and school management, the use of data from portable biofeedback devices by coaches, the role of religion in team activities and their medical, mental health and nutritional support for athletes.

DETECTION:Texas Tech basketball players describe a toxic culture

MORE COVERAGE:Softball coach resigns after review

It listed 14 “concrete steps” that the school had taken during the long-term review of the firm. “The report recognizes that we have already taken and continue to take the necessary steps to support our student athletes,” said school president Lawrence Schovanec in a statement. “As we continue to implement the additional suggestions in the report, I am confident that Texas Tech will remain at the forefront of meeting the health and wellbeing needs of our student athletes.”

The report indicated the existence of potentially problematic rules on other teams. The women’s basketball rules were cited as an example after the report found that teams other than the soccer team “have introduced rules that impose unenforceable restrictions on student athletes, that is, rules that prohibit the exchange of scholarship information or space restrictions”. to players who have no reasonable connection with the athletics participation of the student-athlete. “

The report did not name any of the team’s coaches. In the case of the soccer team, it only referred to “the former soccer head coach” and “the former employees”. Matt Wells was fired as the team’s head coach on October 25.

Athletics spokesman Robert Giovannetti said via text message Wednesday night: “This matter had no basis for Matt’s resignation.”

While the school has hired former Baylor assistant coach Joey McGuire to replace Wells, the school’s athletics website shows that Wells’ assistants remain in their roles. And on Wednesday the school announced that offensive coordinator Sonny Cumbie, who served as interim head coach, was being taken over by McGuire.

Wells, who was hired by Texas Tech in late November 2018, had an overall record of 13-17 with the school (7-16 in Big 12 Conference Play). Speaking at a press conference following the announcement of his firing, Hocutt said Wells was “a very good man” and one “who always operates with integrity and character. … Matt Wells did many things right. The field performance did not meet our” expectations . “

According to the report, the rules of the football team, which “had not yet been discussed as of the date of this November 23 report,” included a phrase “instructing players to” keep all football deals at all times “. [i]n the soccer family ”rather than being a“ locker room attorney, ”a term often used to describe players advising other athletes on their individual rights. The rules go on to say: “Lawyers in locker rooms will not hold up!” And “Nobody will listen to you.” ”

The report states that the team’s “rape and social policies” were in part:

“If you are a college football student athlete, regardless of the situation, you are automatically presented to the public. Studies have shown that a third of sexual assaults on campus involved student athletes. These crimes are prosecuted and punishable by up to 30 years in prison. Take the time to think before you act. Do not put yourself in a no-win situation. “

The guideline asks players to keep a number of seven statements in mind, including:

“Believe that NO means NO!”

“An individual never owes you sex – NEVER !!!”

“Never initiate intercourse or sexual acts when the woman is drunk or passed out.”

“Any sexual assault on a person will not be tolerated.”

The guideline adds, “Alcohol and drugs were a factor in over 75% of rape and sexually assaulted activities on campus. In a court of law this falls under ‘rape’. “

The report said that the athletics department should “review” the teams [sic] Rules carefully and remove these provisions that are unenforceable, out of date or otherwise inconsistent with Texas Tech policies and procedures for promoting the well-being of students and athletes. However, revising a problematic team rule will not fix the limitation unless the team culture behind the rule is also taken into account. “

And among its separate recommendations, the report states that school officials “should meet with the football team, coaches and sport-related staff to discuss the instructions of the previous coaching staff not to speak to anyone outside the program about the program”.

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Women’s Health

The Royal strives for ‘hospital without walls’ to address mental health issues, substance use — and stigma

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Canadians from all walks of life experience mental health problems and substance use. And in Ottawa, The Royal is at the forefront of building what its CEO calls the “hospital without walls” to address those challenges – and the stigma – wherever people are.

It is a mission that makes fundraising critical to The Royal’s ambitious approach to service delivery.

“The silos of mental illness and drug use end at The Royal because we believe there should be no limits to treatment,” said Joanne Bezzubetz, president and CEO of The Royal, the Carling Avenue facility that Ottawa’s primary treatment for mental health and capital research is region.

Bezzubetz stated that every year thousands of people in and around Ottawa receive services from The Royal without ever entering the complex on Carling. The Royal works with other mental health professionals, health care providers and social services to care for people in shelters, long-term care facilities and at home.

“The Royal is there to provide this type of care,” said Tracey Welsh, community building director for the Royal Ottawa Foundation for Mental Health. “The Royal’s mental health community component is a really integral part. Sometimes people think it’s just that great building on Carling Avenue. But it’s so much more. “

One in five Canadians experiences mental health problems each year, according to the Canadian Mental Health Commission. Susan Farrell, vice president of patient care and community psychiatry for the Royal Ottawa Health Care Group, said the number is rising.

The pandemic is really difficult for everyone. With this, we see both the deterioration in people’s mental health and the development of new mental health problems, including substance use.

– Susan Farrell, vice president of patient care and community mental health at The Royal

“The pandemic is really difficult for everyone,” she said. “With this we see both the deterioration in people’s mental health and the development of new mental problems, including substance use.”

A report from Public Health Ontario found that “Ontarians have a high burden of disease associated with mental illness and addiction.” The report concluded that while effective treatment options are available, only a small proportion of those affected receive them.

The Welshwoman said she saw a sharp surge in demand for mental health services in her 15 years at The Royal. She said the center lacks the capacity to provide assistance to everyone in need.

She said this underscores the importance of awareness raising, as well as funding for mental health care and research. And the Welshwoman added that she hoped the situation will continue to improve.

“People are really taking solace in supporting the Royal’s events and mental health in general,” she said. “Watching events grow – our fundraising increases – are real signals that people are becoming much more aware, much more open to donations and much more open to support.”

The Royal is expanding its services to be more accessible, and this is where things like a recent fundraising breakfast come in very handy, Welsh said.

“Sometimes people think it’s just that great building on Carling Avenue, but it’s so much more.”

– Tracey Welsh, The Royal

The Royal’s most recent 14th annual Leaders for Mental Health Breakfast raised $ 733,411, and rising in the weeks following the virtual event.

The proceeds from breakfast will be distributed among several mental health services at The Royal, including the Rapid Access Addiction Medicine Clinic and the Prompt Care Clinic.

The Royal Ottawa Hospital is expanding its services to meet the increased demand for mental health care in the community. [Photo © Krystin Ptaszkiewicz]

Virtual services

Alternative ways of accessing psychosocial support have become increasingly important in recent years when physical going to a clinic was not an option. Virtual care via video conferences or by telephone has also been extended to existing and new patients.

The high demand for services related to substance use has prompted the federal government to open RAAM clinics across the country.

The clinics provide immediate help for people who consume substances or who suffer from substance use disorders. They have adapted to be more accessible by offering the ability to check in through “virtual front doors”.

The Royal recognized the limits of technology and specifically for people who may not have a mobile phone or have no access to the internet. The institution is now making telephones and data tariffs – donated by TELUS – available to the people who need them.

The Prompt Care Clinic was originally implemented in response to the increased demand for immediate mental health services during the first wave of the pandemic. It offered short-term virtual care, including assessment, medication, and psychotherapy.

“We’re trying to improve access to our services by making the service delivery model as flexible as possible,” said Farrell. “Another barrier is making sure the services are appropriate for the person and what they need … so that we can meet people where they are in their communities and in recovery or access to medical care Care.”

The Prompt Care Clinic received 1,000 referrals within the first six months of opening.

The Royal recently announced the launch of a version of the Prompt Care Clinic that will include additional personal services in addition to its virtual platform.

Part of the funding for this project comes from this year’s Women’s Mental Health Run. Farrell said more than two-thirds of people who presented themselves at the Prompt Care Clinic were women – a high percentage of whom had never used mental health services before.

Run for women

“In Ottawa, we have a very proud tradition of running for the mental health of women. The run is both an opportunity for conversation and a sense of community, ”said Farrell.

The annual run is the organization’s “largest fundraiser” to support the services for women at The Royal. This includes the Women’s Mental Health Program – a community-based outreach service for hospitals and women’s shelters.

In 10 years the number has grown from 600 to 6,000 in 18 cities across Canada. She stressed the importance of having programs tailored to women’s specific needs and the psychological care they receive.

To date, the Run for Women has raised more than $ 1.7 million for women’s mental health. The official date for the Women’s Mental Health Run 2022 has not yet been set, but The Royal is already encouraging the community to get involved.

Words are important

A major focus of The Royal’s fundraising campaign, including the recent breakfast event, has been on the power of words used when talking about mental health.

“We still have too much stigma surrounding access to care in our community. I am confident that a silver lining in the increased rates of mental health problems during COVID is that the conversation is much more frequent and people understand the need to have access to medical care, ”Farrell said. “I hope it will reduce stigma.”

Farrell highlighted the stigmatizing effect that the words we choose can have on people with mental health problems or illnesses, including people who use substances or have a substance disorder. The most recent breakfast focused on using the person’s first language more consciously.

The person’s first language focuses on the individual, not the condition.

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Women’s Health

Serena Williams Flaunts Her Legs In A Swimsuit In New IG Photos

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  • Serena Williams is vacationing in a tropical place and shares snippets of her fans on Instagram.
  • Tennis GOAT, 40, posted a series of underwater images in a new post, and they are everything.
  • Serena recently told Women’s Health that she is following a plant-based diet and is trying to view food as fuel.

    Serena Williams is vacationing in a tropical place and shares snippets of her fans on Instagram. The latest: Serena totally whips the model poses while snorkeling.

    Tennis GOAT, 40, posted a series of underwater images in a new post, and they are everything. There’s Serena showing off her toned legs as she stretches out in a snakeskin print one-piece, Serena swimming in the ocean with her hand under her head, Serena flashing peace signs over a pile of fish, and one final shot of just Serena’s well-toned legs and bum.

    “If you ask how I got that ball … it’s underwater training :)” she joked in the caption.

    People were in the comments about it. “Stop intimidating the sharks!” Wrote one person. “Legs,” said another.

    This content is imported from Instagram. You may find the same content in a different format or more information on their website.

    Obviously, Serena gets a lot of that jaw-dropping tone from logging hours on the tennis court. But that’s not all she does.

    Last year Serena posted a modified yoga-inspired workout routine (which she calls a “warm up”) on Instagram. In it, Serena and her sister, her fellow tennis legend Venus Williams, worked a series of stretches and strengthening exercises for 30 minutes.

    “I like to call [this] a warm up, but it’s a bit intense, ”said Serena at the beginning. Afterward, Serena said to her sister, “I’m going to do cardio,” because of course she did.

    This content is imported from Instagram. You may find the same content in a different format or more information on their website.

    As for that cardio, Serena also shared a video on TikTok last July doing a weighted HIIT workout. She tossed a bit of everything into the mix, including interval ladder training, some ab exercises with a resistance band, weighted jump squats, box jumps, a number of plank variations, and more.

    This content is imported from {embed-name}. You may find the same content in a different format or more information on their website.

    But Serena doesn’t just train hard: she also eats well. She recently told Women’s Health that she followed a plant-based diet and tried to use food as fuel. “Eat to live. Don’t live to eat,” she said. “I want to have a healthy lifestyle and you know [I’m eating] a lot of green and lately mostly vegetable, just super healthy stuff. “

    Serena said she doesn’t like to eat first – “When I roll out of bed, I’m just not hungry” – so lunch, which usually contains vegetables and protein, is often her first meal of the day.

    When a tournament comes up, however, she will switch to pasta.

    “I only eat pasta when I’m playing or training. Usually you never see me eating pasta. Because I feel like I’ve had to eat it so often in my career. It’s just like that, I never want to see pasta again, ”she said.

    Shortly before a competition, she sticks to a certain menu. “I usually like to eat a lot of greens before my game and then actually fruit, a little carbohydrates and some kind of protein,” she said.

    But Serena also describes her eating habits as “moody”.

    “I can have a smoothie for six months and then I think I don’t want to see a smoothie for the next six months,” she said. “And then I say, okay, I’m back to the smoothie. My food is very moody. “

    .


    Korin Miller is a freelance writer specializing in general wellbeing, sexual health and relationships, and lifestyle trends, with work on men’s health, women’s health, self, glamor, and more.

    This content is created and maintained by a third party and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may find more information on this and similar content at piano.io

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Women’s Health

Black Tech Founders Want to Change the Culture of Health Care, One Click at a Time

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When Ashlee Wisdom released an early version of their health and wellness website, more than 34,000 users – most of them Black – visited the platform in the first two weeks.

“It wasn’t the best working platform,” recalls Wisdom, 31. “It wasn’t sexy.”

But the start was successful. Now, more than a year later, Wisdom’s Health in Her Hue is bringing black women and other women of color nationally together with culturally sensitive doctors, doulas, nurses and therapists.

As more patients seek culturally literate care – recognizing a patient’s heritage, beliefs, and values ​​while receiving treatment – a new wave of black tech founders like Wisdom are keen to help. Just like Uber Eats and Grubhub revolutionized food delivery, black-tech health startups in the United States are looking to transform the way people exercise, eat, and communicate with doctors.

Inspired by their own experiences and those of their parents and grandparents, black entrepreneurs are creating startups that aim to use technology to bridge the cultural gap in healthcare – while creating profitable businesses at the same time.

“One of the most exciting growth opportunities in healthcare innovation is helping underrepresented founders build healthcare companies that focus on underserved markets,” said Unity Stoakes, president and co-founder of StartUp Health, a San Francisco-based company that runs in a row has invested by healthcare companies run by people of color. He said these leaders have “an essential and strong understanding of how to solve some of the greatest challenges in healthcare.”

Platforms created by black founders for black and colored communities continue to flourish because these entrepreneurs often see problems and solutions that others may overlook. Without different voices, entire categories and products in critical areas like healthcare would simply not exist, say economists.

“We’re really addressing a need,” said Kevin Dedner, 45, founder of mental health startup Hurdle. “Mission alone is not enough. You have to solve a problem. “

Headquartered in Washington, DC, Dedner’s company connects patients with therapists who “honor culture rather than ignore it,” he said. He started the company three years ago, but more people turned to Hurdle after the assassination of George Floyd.

In Memphis, Tennessee, Erica Plybeah, 33, is focused on providing transportation. Her company, MedHaul, works with providers and patients to ensure low-cost rides to get people to and from their doctor’s appointments. Caregivers, patients or providers fill out a form on the MedHaul website and the Plybeah team will help them plan a trip.

While MedHaul is for everyone, Plybeah knows People of Color, low-income and rural residents are more likely to face transportation hurdles. She started the company in 2017 after years of watching her mother take care of her grandmother, who lost two limbs to type 2 diabetes. They lived in the Mississippi Delta, where transportation was scarce.

“My family struggled with our transport for years because my mother was their main carrier,” said Plybeah. “Trying to schedule all of the doctor’s appointments according to her work schedule was just a nightmare.”

Plybeah’s company recently received funding from Citi, the banking giant.

“I’m more than proud of her,” said Plybeam’s mother, Annie Steele. “Every step surprises me. What she does will help people for many years to come. “

Mission alone is not enough. You have to solve a problem.

Kevin Dedner

Health in Her Hue started 2018 with just six doctors on the list. Two years later, users can download the app for free and then scroll through around 1,000 providers.

“People keep talking about the poor health outcomes of black women, and that’s where the conversation ends,” said Wisdom, who lives in New York City. “I haven’t seen anyone build something to strengthen us.”

As her business continues to grow, Wisdom takes inspiration from friends like Nathan Pelzer, 37, another Black Tech founder who started a company in Chicago. Clinify Health works with community health centers and independent clinics in underserved communities. The company analyzes medical and social data to help doctors identify their most vulnerable patients and those who have not seen them in a while. By focusing on providing preventative care to these patients, healthcare providers can help them improve their health and avoid trips to the emergency room.

“You can think of Clinify Health as a company that supports triage outside of the emergency room,” said Pelzer.

Pelzer said he started the company by printing out online slideshows he created and tossing them in the trunk of his car. “I was driving down the south side of Chicago, knocking on doors and saying, ‘Hey, that’s my idea,'” he said.

Wisdom got her app idea because she was so stressed out during her studies that she broke out in hives.

“It was really bad,” recalled Wisdom. “My hand would just swell and I couldn’t figure out what it was.”

The outbreaks also baffled her allergist, a white woman who told Wisdom to take two Allegra every day to relieve the discomfort. “I remember thinking that if she was black I might have said a little more about what was going on in my life,” said Wisdom.

The moment inspired her to build an online community. Your idea started out small. She found health content in scientific journals, looked for eye-catching photos to complement the text, and then posted the information on Instagram.

I haven’t seen anyone build anything to strengthen us.

Ashlee wisdom

From then on it started. Health in Her Hue launched Care Squads this fall for users who want to talk to doctors or other women interested in the same topics about their health.

“The last thing you want to do when you go to the doctor’s office is feel like you have to put on armor and feel like you are fighting or at odds with the person who is supposed to do it his will help you on your health path, “said Wisdom. “And that is often the situation that black people and, for the most part, black women too, have to contend with when they are involved in healthcare. And that just shouldn’t be the case. “

As black tech founders, Wisdom, Dedner, Pelzer and Plybeah are looking for ways to support one another by offering advice on trading, talking about financing, and looking for ways to get together. Pelzer and Wisdom met several years ago as part of a Johnson & Johnson-sponsored competition. They met again at another event for black tech company founders and decided to help each other.

“We are each other’s therapists,” said Pelzer. “As a black founder, it can get lonely out here.”

Going forward, Plybeah plans to provide transportation services and additional help to people caring for aging family members. She also hopes to expand the service to bring customers in for grocery and pharmacy runs, gym workouts, and other basic errands.

Pelzer wants Clinify Health to make health care tracking more fun – possibly with incentives to keep users engaged. He develops plans and wants to harness the same competitive energy as fitness companies.

Wisdom aims to support doctors who want to improve their relationships with patients of color. The company plans to build a library of resources that could serve as a guide for professionals.

“We are not the first to try to solve these problems,” said Dedner. But he and the other three feel the pressure to succeed not only for themselves and their predecessors.

“I have a feeling that if I fail, the door may be closed to other Black women trying to build up in this room,” Wisdom said. “But I try not to think too much about it.”

KHN (Kaiser Health News) is a national newsroom that produces in-depth journalism on health topics. Together with Policy Analysis and Polling, KHN is one of the three major operational programs of the KFF (Kaiser Family Foundation). KFF is a non-profit foundation that provides the country with information on health issues.

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