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7 Delicious Dishes That Taste Better In Their Native Country        

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Travel usually means marveling at spectacular sceneries. Five years ago, we noticed how much better food tastes in his home country. That is understandable because outside, the exact ingredients may not be readily available, or the recipes have been modified to cater to local tastes.

So, for those who truly love good food — we don’t have to be gourmets or the next Anthony Bourdain — we have to travel to taste the real thing.

Hainanese chicken rice

Photo credit: Chacol / Shutterstock.com

1. Hainanese Chicken Rice

Singapore And Malaysia

This is one of my all-time favorite dishes. I discovered it in Singapore at the Hyatt Regency Hotel (now Grand Hyatt Singapore) in the early 1990s, when I was still traveling the world for corporate work. Reports are that the hotel chefs have perfected the recipe over the past 30 years and the Singapore branch is where they now have the best Hainanese Chicken Rice in the world.

Originating from Hainan in southern China, immigrants brought the dish with them wherever they eventually settled. So, it is also widely available for just a song in hawkers’ centers. It has become Singapore’s unofficial national dish and Malaysia has adopted it as a culinary staple.

It’s healthy and full of flavor, especially when served with sliced ​​cucumbers and steamed bok choy. I make a poor man’s version, remaining true to three key secrets: poaching the chicken slowly at low temperature, cooking the rice with the poaching broth, and using the poaching broth as the base for the three sauces (garlicky, sweetened soy, and spicy ).

Pro Tip: The KL International Airport 2 has a branch of the well-known Malaysian chain, “The Chicken Rice Shop,” that is built around the dish. Don’t miss it on a layover!

Seafood paella, a popular Spain dish

Seafood paella

Photo credit: Carol Colborn

2. Spanish Paella Con Chorizo

Spain

During a week in the Andalusian region of Spain, we took day trips to the historic Alhambra and Generalife in Granada and the Plaza de Espana, the Alcazar, and the Catedral in Seville. We were based in Malaga right on the Costa del Sol, relishing the beach, sun, and building fancy sandcastles for hours.

Every waterfront restaurant was peddling its version of the world-famous Spanish Paella. My husband fell in love with the dish, so I had to learn how to make it! The secret ingredients are:

  1. Spanish chorizo ​​sausage
  2. Expensive authentic saffron
  3. Special short grain rice

They were cooking them in plain view and I saw that the chorizo ​​slices were first fried to release their savory oil whereas garlic, onions, tomatoes, bell pepper, and rice were sauteed. Adding broth and covering finishes the steaming of the rice. Lastly, chicken or seafood previously fried with chorizo ​​oil decorate the top.

I have found a special kiosk to buy good Spanish chorizos in Phoenix. I use either cheaper imitation saffron or substitute with turmeric and source the rice (paella, arborio, or sushi) from the grocery store. Bless my husband. Even if what I make is just passable, he loves it.

Pro Tip: Never use another type of chorizo, especially not the Mexican version. Mexican cuisine is very different from Spanish.

Prekmurje gibanica, a Slovenian dessert

Prekmurje gibanica

Photo credit: Carol Colborn

3. Desserts With Just A Hint Of Sweetness

Slovenia

We hosted two friends in the US that we met on the Philippines’ island of Palawan. In turn, they hosted us in Slovenia. We stayed at the Airbnb property of our girlfriend’s family located at the foot of the castle in the Old Town of the capital Ljubljana. The National Slovenian Cuisine Restaurant was a tenant on the ground floor, so she hosted a dinner of Slovenian sausages paired with special buckeye wheat dumplings.

What we loved best was the prekmurje gibanica, a layered pastry filled with poppy seeds, cottage cheese, walnuts, apples, and cream. It had just a hint of sweetness. This dessert experience was repeated in beautiful Lake Bled where our other friend had a waterfront condo unit he lent us. He also led us to where tourists flock to sample kremna rezina, the famous Bled cream cake.

The secret to Slovenian cuisine is that very little sugar or salt is added. They depend on the natural sweetness or salinity of the ingredients. Every Slovenian house has a small garden where they plant their favorite vegetables and fruits. Water comes from crystalline sources, aplenty in the green country.

Pro Tip: Usually, dishes have no names at authentic restaurants. Instead, menus list all the ingredients used in a dish.

Vegetable tempura

Vegetable tempura

Photo credit: Piyato / Shutterstock.com

4. Vegetable tempura

Japan

My husband and I are in our 70s and we have committed to eating as healthy as possible; vegetables are now center stage for us. It is generally believed that Japanese cuisine is one of the reasons for long lives in Japan. Thus, we try to make Japanese dishes at home; it’s also a good way to remember about our trips there.

One of my favorites is tempura. I always order it at Japanese restaurants because it has this light and soft breading that’s very difficult to replicate. The dish usually consists of seafood, meat, and vegetables that have been coated and deep-fried to perfection.

It was introduced by the Portuguese who had settled in Nagasaki and their fritter-cooking technique of the 16th century took root. The name comes from the Latin phrase quatuor anni tempora, historically the Ember Days, when no meat is supposed to be consumed. Tempura must have originated as a vegetable dish. That’s how I choose to make it — with sweet potato, carrots, broccoli, eggplant, and onions.

Pro Tip: I can now make my humble version at home, almost like the way they make it in Japan because this tempura batter mix is ​​available on Amazon. Use the air fryer for a healthier version!

Belgian waffles

Belgian waffles

Photo credit: Carol Colborn

5. The Belgian Waffle

Brussels, Belgium

We were hugely impressed by the absolute grandeur of the Grand Place and the Atomium in Brussels, Belgium. What struck us most was how food is celebrated on every corner with Belgian culinary specialties. Two of them, beer and chocolates, can be easily packaged to reach our homes in their original distinct flavors.

You have to try the Belgian waffle in Belgium. I am a waffles (instead of pancakes) girl because of its texture. Our waffle maker at home makes the ordinary kind, but much thinner. So, we were determined to have a Belgian waffle a day while we were there. At first, we had a tough time deciding which waffle place to enter and which ones to order. However, we soon learned to choose the least sinful.

The waffle itself is a treasure, made with a yeasted batter that makes it extra light and fluffy yet crisp on the outside. Baking powder and/or baking soda have been used of late but it’s better the original way. They are made in a special larger iron with a deeper grid pattern and finished with crunchy sugar. Choose to load up with healthy toppings.

Pro Tip: If you are in Belgium, don’t forget to sample moules-frites or fried mussels. I don’t normally eat mussels, but I love this dish!

Cornish pasties

Cornish pasties

Photo credit: Carol Colborn

6. Cornish pasties

England

When we are in England, my husband usually looks for Cornish pasties. I soon learned how different they are from meat pies. This British pastry was associated with the mining industry and Cornwall. It is made by placing an uncooked filling — of beef, potato, and the buttery vegetable swede (yellow turnip or rutabaga), seasoned with salt and pepper — on one half of a flat pastry circle, folding the pastry in half, and crimping the curved edge to form a seal before baking.

There are variations in Australia, the US, and elsewhere. But, all pasties are different from the meat pies from other cuisines and cultures like the Spanish empanadas, pierogies of Eastern Europe, Indian samosas, etc. They are much larger and have more veggies.

Pro Tip: The West Cornwall Pasty Company is the UK’s largest pasty maker and is number 51 of the UK’s top 100 companies. Their pasties are available in UK groceries and cafes.

South Melbourne Market

South Melbourne Market

Photo credit: Benjamin Crone / Shutterstock.com

7. DimSim

Melbourne,Australia

My daughter’s first home was just a ten-minute walk to the South Melbourne Market. I was there at least once a week for food items like Hot Jam donuts. I also loved the famous Australian dim sim, a snack that dates back to 1928. Like dim sum, it’s a kind of dumpling.

Popularized by a Chinese immigrant in Melbourne, it consists of minced meat, cabbage, and seasoning encased in a rectangular wrapper. It’s much larger than the traditional dim sum, but also served deep fried or steamed and dipped in soy sauce. I have not seen them outside Melbourne so for this one, you definitely have to go there!

Pro Tip: The South Melbourne Market is the birthplace of the even larger circular version, commonly known as the “South Melbourne Dim Sim.”

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Healthy Eating

Diabetes: 7 healthy dates or khajoor recipes for people with diabetes

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If you are a diabetic with a sweet tooth, eating dates or khajoor in moderation can be a healthy choice for you to satisfy your sugar cravings. High on fructose but highly nutritious, dates are a storehouse of fibre, iron, calcium, magnesium, zinc, and vitamins A, K, and B-complex. Good thing is that they are low in Glycemic index (GI) and have medium Glycemic load (GL). This means that while people with diabetes shouldn’t go overboard eating khajoor or dates, they can safely enjoy them in moderation as a natural sugar substitute in their meals. The trick is to combine them with healthy and diabetes-friendly ingredients that would not cause a sugar spike. (So ​​read: Ayurveda expert on rules to eat dates or khajoor, benefits, best time to eat)

“Dates are among the healthiest foods, are delicious, and have a low glycaemic index. Additionally, numerous studies came to the conclusion that dates do not cause blood sugar levels to surge. They are very nutritious and packed with a range of essential components. They also have a lot of dietary fibre, iron, calcium, magnesium, zinc, and vitamins A, K, and B-complex in addition to fructose.Congestion, heart disease, and diarrhea are just a few issues that these nutrients help with, says Nutritionist Anupama Menon.

“Dates are considered to be highly nutritious due to the presence of healthy antioxidants, fiber and natural slow absorbing sugars. Diabetics can safely include dates in their diet with a few considerations. The average GI of dates is 42. This makes them a low GI food and safe for diabetics when eaten in moderation,” says Arooshi Garg, Lifestyle Expert and Nutritionist, GOQii.

Garg says the fiber present in dates helps the body absorb carbohydrates slowly which in turn prevents sudden spikes in sugar level in the bloodstream.

Diabetics should try combining dates with a source of complex proteins to manage blood sugar levels.

HEALTHY KHAJOOR OR DATES RECIPES FOR DIABETICS

Anupama Menon and Arooshi Garg suggest some healthy ways to consume dates for people with diabetes:

Menon says dates, when used, must be the unsweetened natural variety, especially when it comes to diabetics. The nutritionist says such dates are a great way to cut down on sugar cravings.

1.Sweet chutney

“Make the traditional sweet chutney with dates where you pressure cook 100g dates with 100g tamarind with a little chilli powder and salt. Once cooled, the mush is ground and filtered to make the traditional meetha chutney that could be used in bhel or as a dip . One can use about 2-3 tsp a day,” says Menon.

2. Date milkshake

“Dates can be soaked for 3-4 hours in milk and then blended to make a milkshake with lots of ice for a hot summer’s day,” says Menon.

3. Date dry fruit balls

“To make this mix together some chopped dates, shredded almonds, pistachios and pine nuts. Shape the mixture in small balls and coat with toasted sesame seeds. Let them set for a few hrs in the refrigerator and enjoy this healthy treat,” says Arooshi Garg.

4. Dates and oats Laddoo

“To whip up this simple recipe mix together some toasted rolled oats, add some roasted ragi flour. In a mixer add 5-6 pitted dates and pulse it. Then add oats and ragi and choice of nuts. Shape the dough into mini ladoos, says Garg.

5. Dates halwa

“Enjoy this delicious halwa with a healthy twist. To make soak 6-7 pitted dates in warm milk. Blend them to make a fine puree. In a pan add 1 tsp ghee, sauté some nuts in ghee. Then add the prepared date puree and add some powdered cardamom. Once the mix leaves the side of the pan, switch off the flame and enjoy this hot winter treat!” says Garg.

6. Date smoothie

Another high protein recipe apt for diabetics. In a blender add 2 dates and 250 ml milk. Make a fine puree. Add some almonds and half tsp flaxseeds and a pinch of cinnamon powder. Blend this together to enjoy a guilt free smoothie, says Garg.

7. Oats and date kheer

Enjoy this traditional Indian recipe with a healthy twist. Boil 500ml low fat milk. Add 5-6 sliced ​​dates and 3 tbsp roasted rolled oats. Cook for 5 minutes, add some dried rose petals or cardamom powder for an irresistible aroma. Serve this hot on a winter evening, share Garg.

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Plant-based diet linked to lower risk in men

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Share on PinterestMore evidence emerges in support of the notion that a healthy plant-based diet is linked to a lower risk of bowel cancer. Image credit: Jimena Roquero/Stocksy.

  • Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the United States.
  • The risk of developing colorectal cancer is increased by overweight or obesity, smoking, and a diet high in red or processed meats.
  • Including plenty of whole grains, fresh fruit, and vegetables in one’s diet can reduce this risk, existing research has shown.
  • A large study has now found that, in men, a diet that is high in healthy plant-based foods is associated with lower colorectal cancer risk.

Colorectal cancer, also known as bowel, colon, or rectal cancer, is the third most commonly diagnosed and the second deadliest cancer in the United States.

Most people who receive a colorectal cancer diagnosis are over the age of 50, although it can affect younger people, too.

In recent years, cases in older people have started to decline, but the incidence among younger people is increasing. However, these changes may be due to more effective cancer screening.

The risk of colorectal cancer increases with age. Other risk factors people cannot influence are a family history of colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel diseases — such as Crohn’s disease — and certain genetic syndromes.

There are, however, many lifestyle factors that also influence a person’s risk of colorectal cancer. Factors that are likely to increase the risk include:

  • a diet low in fiber, fruit, and vegetables
  • Lack of physical activity
  • a diet high in fat and red or processed meat
  • overweight and obesity
  • Tobacco use and heavy alcohol consumption.

Several studies have investigated the relationship between diet and colorectal cancer, finding that the typical Western diet that is high in fat, red meat, and processed meat increases the risk.

Reducing these foods and increasing foods high in dietary fiber is associated with a reduction in risk.

Plant-based foods tend to be high in dietary fiber, but only in an unprocessed state.

Now, a study that appears in BMC Medicine has found that a diet high in healthy plant-based foods — whole grains, fresh fruit, and vegetables — is associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer in men.

Unhealthy plant-based foods — refined grains, fruit juices, and added sugars — had no beneficial effect on cancer risk.

“This American study adds to lots of existing evidence on the benefits of eating a balanced diet high in fruit, vegetables and fiber for both men and women.”

– Beth Vincent, health information manager, Cancer Research UK (CRUK)

The study group included 79,952 men and 93,475 women who were followed up for an average of 19.2 years. All participants were from Hawaii or the Los Angeles area and were aged between 45 and 75 years at enrollment. The group included people of African American, Japanese American, Native Hawaiian, Latinx, and white volunteers.

At the start of the study, researchers assessed participants’ usual diet with a self-reported questionnaire.

Participants had to report how often and how much they ate out of more than 180 different foods and beverages. They chose from four portion size options, and frequencies ranging from never to four times a day.

From the responses, the researchers calculated daily energy and nutrient intakes, then calculated three plant-based diet indices — overall (PDI), healthful (hPDI), and unhealthful (uPDI).

The researchers defined whole grains, fruits, vegetables, vegetable oils, nuts, legumes, tea, and coffee as healthy plant-based foods. Less healthy plant-based foods included refined grains, fruit juices, potatoes, and added sugars.

To achieve a high hPDI score, participants had to have a high intake of healthy plant-based foods and a low intake of less healthy plant-based foods.

Overall, plant-based diets, particularly healthy plant-based diets, were associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer in men, but not in women. Unhealthy plant-based diets did not appear to reduce the risk.

For healthy plant-based diets, the association was stronger in Japanese American, Native Hawaiian, and white men than in those from other groups.

The researchers suggest that “the benefits from plant-based diets may vary by sex, race and ethnicity, and anatomic subsite of tumor.”

The study had a large sample size, long follow-up time, and racial and ethnic diversity in the study population. However, the authors acknowledge some limitations of the study, including possible selection bias in who responded to the questionnaires and the negative scoring of all animal-based foods.

Several other studies have shown that some animal-based foods may actually be beneficial. Two reviews have found that both fish and dairy products may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer.

Beth Vincent argued that the study findings should be viewed with caution:

“The research tried to compare ‘healthy plant foods’ and ‘unhealthy plant foods’ and found a link with bowel cancer in men. But because of the design of the study, the authors themselves acknowledge we can’t read too much into their results. The study relied on people remembering what they had eaten up to a year ago. It also made the assumptions that participants’ diets stayed the same over many years, and that all meat and animal products were unhealthy — which isn’t the case.”

This study adds to the growing evidence that diet and lifestyle play a key role in cancer risk.

Vincent agreed, giving the following advice: “Eating a well-balanced diet can help with maintaining a healthy weight, which reduces the risk of cancer. Not smoking, cutting down on alcohol, and staying safe in the sun are other important ways to reduce your cancer risk.”

One study suggests that up to 35% of cancers are linked to diet. And diet can greatly affect the risk of colorectal cancers.

The American Cancer Society recommends that to reduce colorectal cancer risk, a person should include lots of vegetables, fruits, and whole grains, and limit the amount of meat they eat.

Prof. Jihye Kim, from Kyung Hee University, who is one of the study authors, says that:

“We speculate that the antioxidants found in foods such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grains could contribute to lowering colorectal cancer risk by suppressing chronic inflammation, which can lead to cancer. As men tend to have a higher risk of colorectal cancer than women, we propose that this could help explain why eating greater amounts of healthy plant-based foods was associated with reduced risk of colorectal cancer in men but not women.”

The authors’ conclusion that “improving the quality of plant foods and reducing animal food consumption can help prevent colorectal cancer” may be a little optimistic, but their study certainly adds to the evidence that a healthy diet can help to reduce overall cancer risk.

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Healthy Eating

7 Day Healthy Meal Plan (Nov 28-Dec 4)

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posted November 26, 2022 by gina

This post may contain affiliate links. Read my disclosure policy.

A free 7-day, flexible weight loss meal plan including breakfast, lunch and dinner ideas and a shopping list. All recipes include macros and links to WW recipe builder to get your personal points.

7 Day Healthy Meal Plan

I hope everyone enjoyed their holiday weekend! I always cherish time spent with my family- I am so thankful for them! If you went off plan this weekend, don’t stress! It is OK to indulge every now and then, just recalibrate and keep going!

With grocery prices soaring, many of us are having to adjust, scale back and/or get more creative with our meals. One of the absolute BEST ways to stay within a budget and maintain healthy eating habits is to MEAL PLAN. You can get more 5-day Budget Friendly Meal Plans by signing up for Relish+ (get a 14-day free trial here!)

Ultimate Skinny Taste Meal Planner

Skinnytaste Ultimate Meal Planner

I’m also excited to share the Skinnytaste Ultimate Meal Planner is now available! The 52 week spiral bound meal planner has weekly meal planning grids you can tear out and put on your fridge if you wish, a 12-week meal plan, 30 (15 new) recipes, and tear-out grocery lists. I love starting my week with gratitude, affirmations and intentions, so I included a space for that as well. I hope you will love this as much as I do!

Skinnytaste Ultimate Meal Planner

Buy the meal planner here:

A note about WW Personal Points:

I no longer provide points since they vary on the new Weight Watchers plans but I do provide links to WW Personal points recipe builder for all recipes. Look for the orange button in the recipe card says my WW personal points. Click on that and it takes you to the Weight Watchers website where you can see the WW points and add it to your day (US only, you must be logged into your account). All cookbook recipes in the cookbook index are also updated!

About The Meal Plan

If you’re new to my meal plans, I’ve been sharing these free, 7-day flexible healthy meal plans (you can see my previous meal plans here) that are meant as a guide, with plenty of wiggle room for you to add more food, coffee, beverages, fruits, snacks, dessert, wine, etc. or swap recipes out for meals you prefer, you can search for recipes by course in the index. Depending on your goals, you should aim for at least 1500 calories* per day. There’s no one size fits all, this will range by your goals, your age, weight, etc.

There’s also a precise, organized grocery list that will make grocery shopping so much easier and much less stressful. Save you money and time. You’ll dine out less often, waste less food and you’ll have everything you need on hand to help keep you on track.

Lastly, if you’re on Facebook join my Skinnytaste Facebook Community where everyone’s sharing photos of recipes they are making, you can join here. I’m loving all the ideas everyone’s sharing! If you wish to get on the email list, you can subscribe here so you never miss a meal plan!

Meal plan:

Breakfast and lunch Monday-Friday, are designed to serve 1 while dinners and all meals on Saturday and Sunday are designed to serve a family of 4. Some recipes make enough leftovers for two nights or lunch the next day. The grocery list is comprehensive and includes everything you need to make all meals on the plan.

MONDAY (11/28)
B: Peanut Butter Protein Oatmeal Cookies*
L: Chicken Salad with Lemon and Dill *in ½ a whole wheat pita and 8 baby carrots
D: 2 cups Kale and Brussels Sprout Salad with Parmesan and Pecans with Dad’s Creamy Cauliflower Soup

Total Calories: 1,024**

TUESDAY (11/29)
B: LEFTOVER Peanut Butter Protein Oatmeal Cookies
L: LEFTOVER Chicken Salad with Lemon and Dill in ½ a whole wheat pita and 8 baby carrots
D: Madison’s Favorite Beef Tacos with Instant Pot Black Beans
Total Calories: 1,107**

WEDNESDAY (11/30)
B: LEFTOVER Peanut Butter Protein Oatmeal Cookies
L: LEFTOVER Chicken Salad with Lemon and Dill in ½ a whole wheat pita and 8 baby carrots
UK: LEFTOVER Madison’s Favorite Beef Tacos with LEFTOVER Instant Pot Black Beans

Total Calories: 1,107**

THURSDAY (12/1)
B: Pumpkin Pie Overnight Oats
L: Protein Egg and Quinoa Salad Jars
GB: Garlic-Ginger Chicken Stir Fry with ½ cup brown rice

Total Calories: 1,190**

FRIDAY (12/2)
B: Pumpkin Pie Overnight Oats
L: LEFTOVER Protein Egg and Quinoa Salad Jars
D: Parmesan Herb Baked Salmon with Garlic Mashed Potatoes and String Beans with Garlic and Oil

Total calories: 1151**

SATURDAY (12/3)
B: Sausage, Cheese and Veggie Breakfast Casserole
L: Tuna Poke Salad (recipe x 2)
D: DINNER OUT

Total Calories: 634**

SUNDAY (12/4)
B: LEFTOVER Sausage, Cheese and Veggie Breakfast Casserole
L: Loaded Baked Potato Soup with 2 ounces multigrain baguette
D: Stuffed Butternut Squash with Wild Rice and Sausage and a green salad #
Total calories: 982**

*Prep Mon-Wed breakfast and lunch Sunday night, if desired.
**This is just a guide, women should aim for around 1500 calories per day. Here’s a helpful calculator to estimate
your calorie needs. I’ve left plenty of wiggle room for you to add more food such as coffee, beverages, fruits,
snacks, desserts, wine, etc.

# Green salad includes 12 cups mixed greens, 4 scallions and 1 cup each: tomatoes, cucumbers, carrots and chickpeas
with ½ cup light vinaigrette. Set aside ½ the salad, with dressing on the side, for dinner Tuesday.

*Google doc

Print Shopping List

shopping list

produce

  • 3 medium very ripe bananas
  • 2 medium lemons
  • 1 medium (6-ounce) PLUS 1 large (7-ounce) Hass avocados
  • 5 Persian cucumbers (can sub 2 medium English cucumbers, if desired)
  • ½ pound Brussels sprouts (or 4 cup pre-shredded)
  • 1 small PLUS 1 medium head cauliflower
  • ½ pound broccoli florets
  • 2 pounds Yukon Gold potatoes
  • 2 medium russet potatoes
  • 10 ounces sliced ​​shiitake mushrooms
  • 1 small red bell pepper
  • 1 small poblano pepper
  • 1 pound green beans
  • 1 large (2-pound) butternut squash
  • 1 pound baby bok choy
  • 2 large head garlic
  • 1 (1-inch) piece fresh ginger
  • 1 medium shallot
  • 1 medium bag of baby carrots
  • 1 (5-ounce) bag/clamshell baby kale
  • 1 (1-pound) bag/clamshell baby arugula
  • 1 (5-ounce) bag/clamshell baby spinach
  • 1 small head Romaine lettuce
  • 1 small bunch of lacinato kale
  • 2 medium bunches of scallions
  • 1 small container/bunch chives
  • 1 small container/bunch of fresh dill
  • 1 small container/bunch of fresh basil
  • 1 small container/bunch fresh thyme (can sub 1 teaspoon dry thyme in Stuffed Butternut Squash, if desired)
  • 1 medium container/bunch fresh Thai basil (can sub ½ cup traditional basil Ginger Chicken Stir Fry, if desired)
  • 1 small bunch of fresh Italian parsley
  • 1 dry pint cherry or grape tomatoes
  • 2 medium plum tomatoes
  • 1 medium red onion
  • 1 small white onion
  • 2 small yellow onions

Meat, Poultry and Fish

  • 1 rotisserie chicken
  • 1½ pounds thin sliced ​​boneless, skinless chicken breast cutlets
  • 1 pound sweet Italian chicken sausage
  • 1 package center cut bacon
  • 2 pounds of 93% lean ground beef
  • 1 (2-pound) skin-on salmon fillet
  • 1 pound sushi grade tuna

grain*

  • 1 pack of quick oats
  • 1 large package crunchy corn taco shells (you need 16)
  • 1 small package whole wheat pitas
  • 1 (8-ounce) multigrain baguette
  • 1 small package unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 1 small package dry quinoa (or ½ cup pre-cooked)
  • 1 small package dry brown rice (or 2 cups pre-cooked)
  • 1 small package dry wild rice

Condiments and Spices

  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • Canola oil
  • Cooking spray
  • Olive oil spray (or get a misto oil mister)
  • Kosher salt (I like Diamond Crystal)
  • Pepper grinder (or fresh peppercorns)
  • Ground cinnamon
  • Vanilla extract
  • Pumpkin pie spice
  • Apple cider vinegar
  • Dijon mustard
  • Pure maple syrup
  • cumin
  • Chili powder
  • paprika
  • Smoked peppers
  • coriander
  • oregano
  • Bay leaves
  • Green Tabasco
  • Sriracha sauce
  • Reduced sodium soy sauce*
  • chili paste
  • Toasted sesame oil
  • Light mayonnaise
  • Rice vinegar
  • Rice wine
  • Wasabi paste
  • Furikake (I like Eden Shake)
  • Light vinaigrette dressing (or make your own with ingredients in list)

Dairy & Misc. Refrigerated Items

  • 1 (18-pack) large eggs
  • 1 small box of salted butter or tub of whipped butter
  • 1 package pre-cooked lentils (can buy dry [green or brown] and cook yourself, if desired)
  • 1 large wedge of fresh Parmesan cheese
  • 1 pint skim milk
  • 1 pint 1% reduced fat milk
  • 1 small tub of light sour cream
  • 1 (8-ounce) bag of reduced fat shredded sharp cheese
  • 1 (8-ounce) bag shredded cheddar cheese (can sub 1 cup reduced fat cheddar in Tacos, if desired)
  • 1 (8-ounce) bag of shredded part-skim mozzarella
  • 1 small container whipped cream or dairy free whipped cream (optional, for topping overnight oats)

Canned and Jarred

  • 1 small jar pumpkin butter (or ingredients to make your own)
  • 1 small jar of peanut butter
  • 1 (32-ounce) carton low sodium chicken broth
  • 1 (32-ounce) carton reduced sodium chicken broth
  • 1 (32-ounce) carton chicken broth
  • 1 (15-ounce) can chickpeas
  • 1 (12-ounce) jar roasted red peppers
  • 1 (8-ounce) can tomato sauce

Frozen

  • 1 small package shelled edamame

mix dry goods

  • Cornstarch
  • 1 small package vanilla protein powder (I like Orgain)
  • 1 package sugar free chocolate chips (such as Lily’s)
  • 1 small package chia seeds (if buying from bulk bin, you need 2 teaspoons)
  • 1 small package granulated sugar (or sugar substitute such as Monk Fruit)
  • 1 (1-pound) package of dry black beans
  • 1 small package fruit juice sweetened dried cranberries (if buying from bulk bin, you need ¼ cup)
  • 1 medium package pecan or walnut halves (if buying from bulk bin, you need about ¾ cup)
  • 1 small package dry roasted peanuts (if buying from bulk bin, you need 1/3 cup)

*You can buy gluten free, if desired

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