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Behavioural Health Market To Be Driven By The Rising Cases Of Mental Disorders In The Forecast Period Of 2021-2026

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The new report by Expert Market Research titled, ‘Global Behavioral Health Market Size, Share, Trends, Growth, Scope, Report and Forecast 2021-2026’, gives an in-depth analysis of the global behavioral health market, assessing the market based on its segments like disorder, services, and major regions.

The report tracks the latest trends in the industry and studies their impact on the overall market. It also assesses the market dynamics, covering the key demand and price indicators, along with analyzing the market based on the SWOT and Porter’s Five Forces models.

Request a free sample copy in PDF or view the report [email protected] https://www.expertmarketresearch.com/reports/behavioral-health-market/requestsample

The key highlights of the report include:

Market Overview (2016-2026)

Forecast CAGR (2021-2026): 3.4%

Forecast Market Size (2026): USD 134 trillion

Increasing adoption of behavioral health software, availability of government funding, government initiatives to encourage EHR adoption in behavioral health organisations, favorable behavioral health reforms, and high demand for mental health services amidst provider shortages are driving the market growth.

The global behavioral health industry is driven by the growing awareness and social acceptance of behavioral health issues. Advancements in clinical therapy and medication management yield better psychological and detoxification treatments, hence boosting the demand for behavioral health.

The demand for support services, such as software upgrades and maintenance, is a primary driver of the market’s growth.

Industry Definition and Major Segments

Behavioral health management software allows patients and caregivers to communicate. These programs safeguard the confidentiality of patient information.

Combining innovative behavioral health tech solutions with traditional behavioral health solutions is expected to improve performance and efficacy, hence expanding the behavioral health industry’s size.

Explore the full report with the table of [email protected] https://www.expertmarketresearch.com/reports/behavioral-health-market

Based on disorder, the market includes:

  • depression
  • anxiety
  • schizophrenia
  • Bipolar Disorders
  • Alcohol Use Disorders
  • Substance Abuse Disorders
  • Eating Disorders
  • Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PSTD)
  • Others

On the basis of services, the market includes:

  • Inpatient Hospital Treatment Services
  • Outpatient Counseling
  • Emergency Mental Health Services
  • Home-based Treatment Services
  • Others

On the basis of region, the industry is divided into:

  • NorthAmerica
  • Europe
  • Asia Pacific
  • Latin America
  • Middle East and Africa

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market trends

Online counseling programs and daycare services are fueling the industry’s expansion. The development of innovative treatment programs, favorable supply and demand, and rising mental health budgets are also adding to the market growth. Growing government measures to support these institutions, and increasing patient desire for community clinics, are expected to boost the adoption of behavioral health software.

The increased emphasis on models, rising software applications in emerging regions, and rising use of telehealth as a means of providing subscription care services will all contribute to the behavioral health market’s growth throughout the forecast period by producing significant opportunities. Social awareness and awareness about mental health have been playing a crucial role in healthcare services and treatment, especially in developing countries.

key market players

The major players in the market are Acadia Healthcare, CareTech Holdings PLC, Universal Health Services, Inc, North Range Behavioral Health, Ascension Seton, Pyramid Healthcare, and Promises Behavioral Health, among others.

The report covers the market shares, capacities, plan turnarounds, expansions, investments and mergers and acquisitions, among other latest developments of these market players.

About Us :

Expert Market Research (EMR) is leading market research company with clients across the globe. Through comprehensive data collection and skilful analysis and interpretation of data, the company offers its clients extensive, latest and actionable market intelligence which enables them to make informed and intelligent decisions and strengthen their position in the market. The clientele ranges from Fortune 1000 companies to small and medium scale enterprises.

EMR customizes syndicated reports according to clients’ requirements and expectations. The company is active across over 15 prominent industry domains, including food and beverages, chemicals and materials, technology and media, consumer goods, packaging, agriculture, and pharmaceuticals, among others.

Over 3000 EMR consultants and more than 100 analysts work very hard to ensure that clients get only the most updated, relevant, accurate and actionable industry intelligence so that they may formulate informed, effective and intelligent business strategies and ensure their leadership in the market.

Media Contact:

Company Name: Claight Corporation

Contact Person: Louis Wane, Corporate Sales Specialist – USA

E-mail: [email protected]

Toll Free Number: +1-415-325-5166 | +44-702-402-5790

Address: 30 North Gloud Street, Sheridan, WY 82801, USA

Website: https://www.expertmarketresearch.com

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Health

Fife family tell of daughter’s journey

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A Fife family whose relationships struggled under the pressures of an eating disorder will enjoy Christmas together this year.

Last Christmas Amy Young from Cellardyke was away from home, very ill and being treated in a specialist unit for eating disorders.

Warning: This article contains sensitive information about disordered eating.

As Amy’s recovery continues, she and her parents hope telling their story will help others feeling desperate or needing support.

Here, Amy, 28, shares how the cost of living led to her health crisis. And mum Celia and dad Dan tell of their joy and pride at their daughter’s progress.

“When you’re in the grip of an eating disorder and somebody tells you things can get better it’s impossible to believe them,” Amy explains.

“I’ve been in that horrible, horrible place. And I’m telling you it’s true, recovery is possible and you can be happy again.”

Amy with mum Celia and dad Dan. Image: Gareth Jennings/DC Thomson.

Amy grew up in Fife, a high achiever, studying at St Andrews before moving to Milton Keynes five years ago to pursue her dream of becoming an engineer.

“That’s when my eating disorders started,” she explains. “I’d not moved away from home before and I had a normal relationship with food growing up.

‘Cost of living crisis’

“For me it was living on a limited budget that started it. First I cut out my socializing budget, which made me quite isolated, then I cut down spending on food.

“This is something we’re seeing in this cost of living crisis too, eating disorders increasing as people restrict.

“Around helped experience their first symptoms of an eating disorder in adulthood.”

Amy walking in St Andrews.
Amy’s recovery included her finding a new, less stressful, job as a tour guide in St Andrews. Image: Gareth Jennings/DC Thomson.

Amy’s illness later spiraled into bulimia and over-exercise but, as with many eating disorders, she kept it secret from her family.

“It’s so easy to tell yourself you’re in control,” Amy says. “You don’t realize you’ve really lost control.”

‘Watching someone you love change’

For Celia and Dan this was one of the most difficult things to deal with.

Celia explains: “It came as a huge shock and, for a long time, Amy battled to keep us in the dark and silent.

“It was a truly dreadful feeling watcing someone you love changing from a happy, energetic, fun-loving girl to someone you hardly recognize.

Mum Celia and Amy.
Mum Celia says discovering Amy had an eating disorder was a huge shock. Image: Amy Young.

“As a mother I felt I’d failed – how could Amy have reached this place ‘unnoticed’?

“I really wanted to find someone whose loved one had developed the illness as an adult living away from home, and this I never did.”

When Amy finally got help (a close friend insisted she go back to her GP after feeling dismissed the first time round) she let her parents back in.

‘I’d pushed my parents away’

“I’d kind of cut them out of my life, pushed them away, as eating disorder brain thrives on isolation,” Amy explains.

The road to her recovery came last year when she was admitted to the Regional Eating Disorders Unit (REDU) at St John’s Hospital in Livingston.

Celia says: “When REDU stepped in we breathed a sigh of relief that someone might be able to stop her dying.

Amy, pictured walking with her parents, is grateful for her parents'
Amy is grateful for her parents’ amazing support. Image: Gareth Jennings/DC Thomson.

“I’ll never forget Amy asking me to take photos of her on the day she went in, so she would remember not to get to this point ever again.

‘Tears streamed down my face’

“Tears streamed down my face as I saw the true nature of this terrible illness.

“Last Christmas Day I was allowed into Amy’s room for the first time. Dan (due to lockdown) stood outside peeking through cracks in the frosted window covering.

“We’re so thankful she stuck with it and forever grateful to the staff that nursed her back from the brink.”

And this Christmas will be very different.

Amy wants to socialize with friends over the festive period, as her eating disorder recovery continues.  Image: Amy Young.
Amy wants to socialize with friends over the festive period, as her eating disorder recovery continues. Image: Amy Young.

The family will be together and Amy will see her friends, including a Christmas lunch with the local wild swimming group she’s joined.

“Last year I had given up hope,” says Amy, who now works as a walking tour guide in St Andrews. “My parents have been amazingly supportive.

Support with Christmas

“This year I realize Christmas is just another day. There can be lots of pressure for it to be this perfect day with lots of socializing around food and drink.

“Beat has advice and an online course about coping with Christmas and practical tips that can help too.

“If you’re dreading Christmas, I know it can be hard, life doesn’t have to be like this.”

Celia agrees: “We’re at a place I never thought we’d get to. We’ll be forever proud of Amy. Speak to BEAT, find a support group, and write to your loved one what you can’t say to their face.”

  • Amy is doing a walk and cake fundraising challenge for REDU; click here to donate.

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Study finds more tickborne illnesses across Canada through more rigorous testing

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A Quebec-based researcher is calling for more comprehensive testing to monitor ticks, noting that pathogens other than Lyme disease are being found in ticks across Canada.

Kirsten Crandall is a PhD candidate at McGill University, and says one pathogen, Babesia odocoilei, is being found in animals like elk and deer in Saskatchewan.

read more:

Tick ​​season is here but experts say ‘no reason’ for Canadians to be overly concerned

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  • Tick ​​season is here but experts say ‘no reason’ for Canadians to be overly concerned

Crandall said that pathogen, as well as another, Rickettsia rickettsii, are being found outside their historical geographical region.

“The reason why these two pathogens are especially important, the Babesia pathogen can actually cause babesiosis, which is a disease that humans can contract. And then Rickettsia can cause Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF), which is also another disease which humans can contract,” Crandall said.

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She said their study, brought together with findings from McGill University and the University of Ottawa, found these diseases in ticks and small mammals, but said there’s potential for them to spread to people.

read more:

Nova Scotia has the highest tick-to-human ratio in the country: biology professor

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) describes babesiosis as a disease caused by microscopic parasites that infected red blood cells.

It notes that it’s normally found in small mammals, but there have been a few cases found in people.

Symptoms of babesiosis include a fever, chills, headache, sweats, body aches, loss of appetite, nausea or fatigue, with the CDC adding that it could be severe or life-threatening for people with pre-existing health conditions.

Rabbit ticks with Rickettsia.

Kirsten Crandall/ McGill University

RMSF is described as a serious tickborne illness that can be deadly if not treated early.

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The CDC lists symptoms of RMSF like a fever, headache, rash, nausea, vomiting, stomach pains, muscle pains and lack of appetite.

Long-term health problems could lead to permanent damage like amputation, hearing loss, paralysis or mental disability.

read more:

Experts expect bad year for ticks as disease carrying bugs expand range in Canada

Crandall said the only reason they found these pathogens was through more comprehensive testing, and part of the study is pushing for more monitoring of ticks, adding that they found pathogens not typically seen in Quebec.

“We tested all of the different tick life stages, including larvae, which are not typically tested in surveyance efforts. And we’re testing for additional pathogens, rather than those that are more common.”

Kirsten Crandall doing field work in her protective gear.

Kirsten Crandall/ McGill University

She said this study is looking beyond what we typically look for in studies related to ticks.

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“If we’re not even aware of where these ticks and these tickborne pathogens are located, how are we able to protect ourselves when we’re going outdoors, or when we’re out enjoying time with others?”

Crandall said we’ve become very aware of Lyme disease, but we don’t know as much about other pathogens that are starting to become much more common in ticks found in Canada.

“If we’re finding concentrations of ticks with these pathogens, then potentially we will start seeing human cases of these diseases.”


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Growing Need for Mental Health Care Straining Existing Resources

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Demand for treatment of anxiety and depression remained high for the third consecutive year as the demand for the treatment of trauma- and stressor-related and substance use disorders has increased.

The demand for mental health treatment continues to grow as many psychologists do not have the capacity to add new patients, according to a new survey by the American Psychological Association (APA).

“The national mental health crisis continues,” said Arthur C. Evans Jr., PhD, APA CEO, in a press release. “If you are struggling, know that you are not alone. Psychological science shows that social support is key to developing resilience, so if you are having difficulty accessing care in a timely way, reach out to others to find support and identify ways to cope.”

The APA’s 2022 COVID-19 Practitioner Impact Survey evaluated how psychologist practice have been altered by the pandemic. The survey collected response from 2295 doctoral-level, active licensed psychologists in the United States from September 20 to October 7, 2022.

The survey showed that the demand for anxiety and depression treatment remained high for the third consecutive year as the demand for treatment for trauma- and stressor-related disorders and substance use disorders has increased as well. For example, 6 in 10 practitioners said they no longer have openings for new patients, approximately 46% said they are unable to meet the demand for treatment, and approximately 72% have longer waitlists than prior to the start of the pandemic.

Psychologists reported that they are contacted by a weekly average of more than 15 potential new patients seeking care. The survey also found that nearly 8 in 10 psychologists are seeing an increase in the number of patients with anxiety disorders since the start of the pandemic. Further, 66% saw an increase in demand for treatment for depression.

Approximately 47% had increased demand for substance use treatment and 64% saw an increase in demand for trauma treatment. Two-thirds of the psychologists in the survey reported an increase in the severity of symptoms among patients in 2022.

The survey also found growing demand for mental health services from young people and health care workers. Across all age groups, the largest growth was seen in adolescents between 13 and 17 years of age seeking care, with 46% of psychologists reporting increases over the prior 12 months. Many psychologists also saw increases in patients between 18 and 25 years of age and children under 13 years of age over the same period.

Approximately helped psychologists observed an increase in health care workers seeking treatment since the start of the pandemic.

“Having timely access to psychological services is critical for addressing the needs of those diagnosed with behavioral health challenges,” Evans said in a press release. “But we need to tackle this problem with a variety of solutions, beyond individual therapy. We need to support and expand the workforce, promote integrated behavioral health into primary care, improve mental health literacy, use technology and innovation to expand reach and improve efficiency. But critically, we must expand our paradigm for addressing behavioral health—especially if we are to successfully address health disparities—by using more public health strategies to reach people earlier and in the places where they live, work, play and worship.”

The survey also found that 11% of psychologists are seeing all patients in person, which grew from 4% in 2021. Telehealth is still growing in use, with more than half of psychologists seeing some patients remotely and some in person, and 31% seeing all patients via telehealth, which is down from 47% in 2021.

Because of the increase in demand, 45% of psychologists said they felt burned out. However, most psychologists said they have either sought peer consultation or support to manage burnout, were able to practice self-care, and have been able to maintain a positive work-life balance.

REFERENCE

Increased need for mental health care strain capacity. American Psychological Association. November 15, 2022. Accessed November 16, 2022. https://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/2022/11/mental-health-care-strains#:~:text=Nearly%20half%20( 47%25)%20said,symptoms%20among%20patients%20in%202022.

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